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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 19 7 





A MOTHER'S 

SONC OF PATRIOTISM. 

A REAL THRILL!! 

IF I HAD A SON FOR 

EVERY STAR 
IN OLD GLORY 

UNCLE SAM I'D GIVE THEM 
ALL TO YOU 

A Sensational hit In any 

spot— on any bill — anytime 

— anywhere! 



SONG 



GET THAT 

INTO 

YOUR 

HEAD. 



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By J. E. Dempsey 

and 
Joseph A. Burke 

Tna ardsiar «*t "Xtwt Bter in 
Old aioiy." 



COMEDY MARCH 

SONG THAT PUTS RHYTHM 

IN EVERYBODY'S FEET ! 

WHERE 

DO WE GO 

FROM HERE? 

Already accepted as 
America's Tipperary- And 
that's going some! 



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Johnson 



.Boston 

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Percy Wenrlch 






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Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1SS3. 



NEW YORK, JUNE 6, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No. 18 
Price, Ten Cent! 



NEW ALBANY 

BILL FAVORS 

AGENTS 

BELL TO FIGHT MEASURE 



Albany, June 5. — A large delegation of 
theatrical people are expected here to-mor- 
row to attend the public hearing, which 
will be held by Governor Whitman at 
noon in the legislative chambers, on the 
bill passed in the Senate by Senator 
Salter, to amend the theatrical employment 
agency law. The bill aims to allow man- 
agers of shows and vaudeville acts im- 
munity from the jurisdiction and super- 
vision of the Commissioner of Licenses of 
New York City, who has control of the 
vaudeville employment agencies, under the 
present law. 

The measure was introduced in the 
Senate by Senator Walter in the fore- 
part of April, and was passed by the upper 
house without opposition. Shortly after- 
ward, Howard Kyle, of the Actors' Equity 
Association, learned abont it and petitioned 
the Governor to grant a pnblic bearing 
before taking final action. 

At the hearing, Kyle is expected to be 
present, with a committee representing his 
organization. Commissioner of Licenses 
George Bell, of New York, with a repre- 
sentative of the Corporation Counsel, is 
also expected to appear in opposition to 
the measure. 



Commissioner Bell, when seen, stated 
that he would nse every means possible 
to persuade the Governor not to sign the 
measure. He declared that, if it were 
passed, practically every vaudeville agent 
could represent himself as a manager of 
acts and, in this manner, avoid coming 
nnder the jurisdiction of the license depart- 
ment. The Commissioner claims that, if 
this measure were passed, the evil of col- 
lecting more than 5 per cent, allowed by 
law would become considerably greater, and 
that the actors would be the ones to suffer. 
In discussing the matter the Commissioner 
said: 

"Should this bill be signed it will give 
practically every vaudeville agent the 
license to become a manager and, when 
that is done, chaos will prevail in the 
business. Men that have been kept out of 
the business by my department will again 
start operations. Absolutely no protection 
can be afforded the actor, as the "man- 
ager" would be out of the juridiction of 
this department, and I would be powerless 
to act. 

"Under the present law, the agency oper- 
ating with a license is responsible for the 
performers' salary should the theatre man- 
ager fail to pay it. But, if the present 
bill u signed by the Governor the agencies 
will forsake their licenses and operate as 
managers of acts and the performers are 
the ones that will Buffer." 

"I have built up my department to a 
very effective state, and I am quite sure 
that I will be able to point ont to Gov- 
ernor Whitman many good reasons aa to 
why he should veto this bilL It appears 
entirely innocent, but, when one goes into 
a thorough investigation, he will easily 
ascertain how ranch harm can be wrought 
through it" 



THEATRE AD MANAGER KILLED 

Grand Rapids, Mich., May 31. — George 
Leslie (Bed) Can dec, for the past seven 
years connected with Power's Theatre as 
advertising manager, was killed yesterday 
when an automobile which he was driving 
turned turtle. He received a fractured 
skull and other injuries and died within a 
few minutes after being taken to Butter- 
worth hospital. Candee, who was thirty- 
three years old, had lived in Grand Rapids 
all bis liTs and was learning to drive an 
automobile tbtt he might secure a position 
as chauffeur in the Red Cross ambulance 
unit. He was a member of the Masonic 
Order and of the Lalakoum Grotto. He is 
survived by his father and mother. 



WANTS "DIAMOND JIM" SEATS 

George Young Bauchle, an attorney, hag 
written letters to several theatre man- 
agers in New York City requesting them 
to allow him to have the first night seats 
that were used by the late "Diamond" 
Jim Brady. The Shuberta immediately 
placed his name on the list instead of 
Brady, but the managers of the Klaw & 
Erlanger houses informed him that they 
were unable to comply with his request 
as the seats had already been disposed of. 
Mr. Bauchle has been a steady first 
nighter for a number of years and says 
that be thought he might better the loca- 
tion of his seats by applying for the Brady 
tickets. 



INTERN'L AFTER ANOTHER HOUSE 

Cincinnati, June 1. — Following re- 
ports that the International Circuit was 
seeking a theatre in Cincinnati, it is 
learned that negotiations have started for 
the taking over of the Empress, and trans- 
forming it into a popular priced dramatic 
house. For several seasons the Empress 
has played S. & C. vaudeville. Last season 
was its most successful, Manager George 
F. Fish making it a record-breaker. It is 
now said that the International will send 
popular priced shows to Cincinnati. Hanks, 
of Chicago, is ■ said to have secured an 
option on the Empress. 



SHUBERTS TO STAR EDDIE FOY 

Eddie Foy will again invade the musical 
comedy field next season under the direc- 
tion of the Shnberts, who are te star bim 
in a production. Whether Foy will have 
any of his children in the show has not 
yet been determined. It was learned that 
it is possible an act will be prepared for 

the children, who will continue in vaude- 
ville minus their pater. 



SET OPENING BURLESQUE POINTS 

The opening points for the attractions 
playing the Columbia Amusement Co. 
circuit were announced by General Man- 
ager Samuel A. Scribner on Monday. 
Each show will jump up five points in 
its opening date, playing their first week 
engagement in the town in which they 
performed their fifth week's work last 
season. 



SUN CRITIC ILL AT SPRINGS 

Frank T. Vreeland is acting as dramatic 
editor of the New York Sun during the 
absence of Lawrence B. Reamer who is 
ill at Hot Springs, West Virginia. Mr. 
Reamer has been absent from his post for 
two weeks and is expected to return about 
the first of the month. 



WORLD BEATING BILL REAPS 
$60,000 AT N. V . A. BENEFIT 

Greatest Program of Vaudeville Stars Ever Assembled, Gives 

Stupendous Performance Before Audience That Jams Huge 

Hippodrome and Contains Elite of the Variety World 



LEW LUBOf TO MANAGE SHOW 

Lew Lubin baa been engaged as man- 
ager for Clark Ross' "Broadway Follies," 
on the International Circuit next season. 



Last Sunday evening, June 3, 1917, will 
forever stand out in large red letters in 
the history of the National Vaudeville 
Artists, for, as a celebration of their 
first birthday, the organization presented 
at the Hippodrome the most stupendous 
and successful vaudeville show ever given 
on any stage. Before the largest au- 
dience that has ever been assembled in 
the big house, the greatest stars of the 
vaudeville world gave their services gratis 
and willingly did their bit for the rais- 
ing of funds for insurance, relief, old age 
pensions and benevolent work. In all 
thirty-eight star acts appeared, but there 
were a score of others waiting to go on 
who bad to be disappointed because of the 
extreme lateness of the hour. Never be- 
fore has New York seen such an imposing 
array of vaudeville talent on one bill, 
and the enthusiasm and applause the 
program received was aa spontaneous at 
midnight as it had been in the early part 
of the evening. It is estimated that, if 
the stars had been paid at their regular 
rate for the evening's services, the payroll 
would have aggregated $30,000. 

The event was practically the first time 
in theatrical history that vaudeville artists 
have given a benefit for themselves. 
Louis Mann, in a short, terse speech 
summed up the situation when he said: 

"Too frequently has the actor been 
called upon to aid others through benefit 
performances; too little and too infre- 
quently has the actor called for support 
on his own behalf. The result of this 
benefit is therefore doubly gratifying. 
And, if the precepts of the National 
Vaudeville Artists are adhered to, there 
will never again be any friction between 
actor and manager." 

The evening's proceeds probably set a 
record for one-night benefits. The sale of 
tickets was not confined to the City of 
New York, but was carried on throughout 
the country with an approximate net sale 
of $30,000. The exact amount of ticket 
sales can not be ascertained until item- 
ized reports come in from all over the 
country. The advertising, in the pro- 
gram netted about $29,000, while the sale 
of programs brought in another $1,000, 
bringing the grand total of receipts up to 
approximately $60,000. 

The audience was, for the most part, 
comprised of vaudeville performers, 
agents, theatrical managers, and others 
more or less interested in the theatrical 
field, and was so large that it was neces- 
sary to put about three hundred seats 
upon the stage to accommodate every- 
one who presented a ticket. 

The show was a trifle late in starting, 
due to the fact that the house was rather 
slow in filling. At about 8.30, Benjamin 
Roberta, who led the orchestra of twenty- 
five pieces, gave the signal to strike up 
the band, and the big program was on 
its way. 

There had been much speculation as to 
who would open the show. Stage Manager 
Pat Casey, with his aides, Mark Nelson 
and R. H. Burnside, decided wisely in al- 
lotting that honor to tbe California Boys' 



Band, which, with several martial airs, 
started the performance with a snap, and 
succeeded in arousing the audience to a 
high pitch of enthusiasm. 

Then Ed Morton, the man who made 
announcing famous, put in an appearance 
and introduced the Seven Bracks, who 
went gingerly through their acrobatic 
.turn. 

From that time on the acts followed 
each other with kaleidoscopic swiftness, 
for there was no time to be lost, if the 
bill was to be carried through as pro- 
grammed. Dorothy Jordan, in a fashion- 
ably tailored suit, was in exceptionally 
good voice and her "Goodbye" song by 
Tosti, richly vibrated through the large 
theatre. Ben Welch, in his familiar 
monologue, put the audience in good 
humor. 

It was about this time that Loney 
Haskell put in an appearance in place of 
Ed Morton and proved to the latter before 
the evening was over that he has a com- 
petitor. Morton and Haskell shared the 
announcing honors fifty-fifty. 

Then followed in quick and successful 
order the Arnaut Brothers, with their 
whistling love specialty; Pat Roonev, in 
fantastic stepping that brought down the 
house; Little Billy, with his impersona- 
tion of George Cohan; and Sophie Tucker, 
with her Jazz band. 

Pbyliss Neilson Terry entered to a 
rousing welcome and gave her hearers a 
musical treat with the Mozart "Magic 
Flute" selection, after which, by way of 
contrast, Mosconi Brothers' Jazz Band en- 
tertained, while the two boys gave a re- 
markable dancing exhibition, sweeping the 
entire Hippodrome stage in their work. 

Joseph Santley made a patriotic appeal 
in song, followed by Henry Lewis, who 
did a portion of his act. Then came Ber- 
nard Granville, singing a patriotic num- 
ber; Mile. Dazie, assisted by Edmund 
MalikoflT, in dances; Gus Edwards and his 
Rose girls; Louis Mann, who delivered a 
short speech; Rock and White, in a new 
military dance; Joe Howard and Ethlyn 
Clark, in a little talk and song; and Eva 
Tanguay, who consumed more time than 
anyone else on the bill and sang with as 
much pep and gusto as if she were re- 
ceiving her regular stipend for doing it. 

The next number was strictly a family 
affair, consisting of Eddie Foy, Mrs. Foy 
and the rest of the Foy family. 

Whiting and Burt, singing a popular 
number, were followed by Houdini, who 
broke his own record in breaking loose 
from a straight jacket contrivance, ac- 
complishing the feat in a minute and a 
half. 

Marion Weeks delivered a vocal num- 
ber in a way that surely pleased, and 
Julia Arthur gave a remarkable recita- 
tive rendition of "The Battle Hymn of 
the Republic," assisted by a singing chorus 
which stood in the wings. The lines of 
the anthem are peculiarly adapted to 
present conditions, and Miss Arthur had 
her audience all but cheering with the 
lines, 

(Continued on next page.) 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



As He died to make men holy, 
We shall die to make men free, 
His Truth is marching on. 
Frank Tinny and James Corbett proved 
to be such an entertaining duo that it is 
to be regretted the two-a-day houses can- 
not see them work together. After they 
had done their bit, they brought out the 
new champion lightweight, Benny Leon- 
ard, and his manager, both of whom were 
introduced to the crowd. 

Orville Harold, in song; Belle Baker, 
in a popular number; Al Herman, with a 
short talk in blackface; Santley and Nor- 
ton, in their recruiting specialty; Stella 
Mayhew, in song; Mclntyre and Heath, 
in a relie of their younger days; and 
Craig Campbell, singing an aria from "la 
iJoheme," all helped the cause along. 

Jack Norworth and Conroy and Le 
Mairc had studied their audience, with 
the result that their effort was a knock- 
out, dealing, as it did, with three mem- 
bers of the theatrical profession addicted 
to the "knocking" habit. It would 
hardly be appreciated by the layman, but 
scored big with the theatrical gathering 
present. 

Anna Held recited a poem which con- 
tained a plea for Prance; Milo gave a 
greater part of his clever impersonations; 
Willie Weston surprised by rendering a 
serious song, and then the orchestra 
struck up one of the well known Eddie 
Leonard melodies. But Leonard only took 
a bow, after which Haskell announced 
that, in deference to the new closing edict, 
the show would stop, although many other 
acts had been expecting and were waiting 
to go on. 

The big crowd surged out, satisfied that ■ 
they had seen the biggest vaudeville spec- 
tacle in the history of the variety world. 
The program girls were as numerous as 
they were pretty, and sold programs at 
twenty-five cents apiece until there were 
practically no more to be had. On the 
cover of the program was a drawing by 
Bert Levey, showing the manager and the 
artist clasping hands with the N. V. A. 
emblem cementing the handshake. A pic- 
ture of Houdini also adorned the front 
cover, which distinction he won at an 
auction several weeks ago when he made 
a bid of $499 for the cover. The pro- 
gram weighed more than an average sized 
book, and, with the exception of three 
pages devoted to the list of acts was 
deluged with advertisements from artists, 
managers and friends. 

Among those who sold programs were: 
Belle Baker, Mrs. Al Von Tilzer, Jane 
Ware, Marta Golden, Truly Sbattuck, 
Doris Leon, Helen Nordstrom, Julia Nash, 
Dorothy Brown Kilgour, Inez Francis, 
Louise Dresser and a" host of others, under 
the supervision of Edward Renten. 

In the boxes were men who have made 
vaudeville what it is today. E. F. Albce 
and J. J. Murdock each entertained large 
parties, as did also F. F. Proctor, Martin 
Beck, Walter Vincent, John Ringling, 
Harry Weber, Claude BoBtock, Harry 
Davis, of Pittsburgh, and Marcus Loew. 

In the B. S. Moss box were Mr. and 
Mrs. B. S. Mess, Mr. and Mrs. Myron 
Sulzberger, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Israel, 
Milton Hirschfeld, Paul Moss and Louis 
N. Moss. Frank Keeney was the host to 
May Murray, Mrs. and Mr. Herbert Bren- 
non, and RoWrt Leonard. Mr. and Mrs. 
S. Z. Poll occupied a box with their 
daughters, Juliette and Lorine. Harry 
Houdini's box party consisted of Harry 
Keller, Mrs. Harry Houdini, C. Gladys 
Weis. Williamson "Brothers. N. J. Weis, 
Mr and Mrs. Theodore Ardine, and Con- 
gressman and Mrs. Griffin. 

Henry Chesterfield entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Chesterfield and Mr. Askin. 
Julia Nash played hostess to Anna Held, 
Patsy de Forest, Ida Fuller and Mrs. 
Harry First. Mr. and Mrs. W. B. John- 
son "and daughter also occupied a box. 
The other boxes were also filled with per- 
sons prominent in the vaudeville world. 

Thousands upon thousands of congratu- 
latorv telegrams were received by Secre- 
tary "Henry Chesterfield from performers 
on the road. 

ANDY LEWIS' DAUGHTER DIES 

Mrs. Charlotte Kornblum. daughter of 
Andy Lewis, died last Thursday at her 
home in Bath Beach,. L. I. 



ROAD CREWS 

WANT MORE 

SALARY 

ASK $5 WEEKLY RAISE 



The advisability of attempting to ob- 
tain an increase of $5 a week for mem- 
bers of the mechanical crews of all 
travelling shows, is one of the most im- 
portant matters being considered at the 
sessions of the Executive Board of the 
International Alliance of Theatrical 
Stage Employees and Motion Picture 
Operators of the United States and Can- 
ada, which have been held daily since 
last Thursday in the executive offices of 
the organization here. 

A conference will be held to-day be- 
tween the board and a committee rep- 
resenting the United Theatrical Man- 
agers' Protective Association in refer- 
ence to the matter. It stems quite likely 
that the demands will be granted to go 
into effect beginning in September. The 
proposition affects carpenters, property- 
men, electricians and their assistants. 

International President Chas. C. Shay 
bas been presiding at all of the sessions, 
which have been attended by William 
Rusk, of San Francisco, Cal.; W. F. 
Canavan, St. Louis; Chas. Molloy, of 
Butte, Mont.; Richard Green, of Chicago; 
Louis KraiiH, of Philadelphia; F. G. 
LeMaster, of Denver; E. A. Clark, of 
Seattle; James Lemke, Troy, N. Y., and 
John J. Barry of Boston. 

Delegations of representatives throueh- 
out the country have also been present 
each day with local grievances to be acted 
upon by the board. 

Another matter that will be taken up 
before adjournment to-morrow or Friday 
will be the question of the unionization 
of the B. S. Moss Circuit of theatres and 
the William Fox vaudeville and motion 
picture houses and studios. 

This proposition will receive summary 
attention fron. tne Board and it is quite 
likely that, should the Moss and Fox 
people not accede to the requests of the 
International, action will be taken where- 
by all locals throughout the country will 
be notified of the situation and a re- 
quest made that they act for the good of 
the unions. 



THIS ACTOR IS NO SLACKER 

Peoria, IB., June 2. — Henry H. Budde, 
lending man of the Flora De Voss Stock 
Company, playing this week at Chillicothe, 
Ohio, came to this city and enlisted in the 
United States Marine Corps at the local 
recruiting station. When he enlisted Budde 
said: "I read last night in a newspaper 
that actors were slackers. That made me 
mad all over. I quit my job at $40 per 
week in order to show the scoundrel that 
there was one actor at least who was not 
a slacker. More of. them will go, too." 



NATIONAL THEATRE OPENS 

Washington, D. C, June 3. — The dedi- 
cation of the National Sylvan Theatre took 
place here last night with the presentation 
of "Drama Triumphant," written and pro- 
duced by Mrs. Christian Hemmick. Among 
the stars who appeared are Serge Oukrain- 
sky, Andreas Pavley, R. D. McLean, 
Odette Tyler, Mme. Tamaki Miura, Sophie 
Braslau, Mrs. W. H. Brown and James K. 
Ha chert, who acted as conductor of the 
orchestra when it played his compositions. 



BARRETTS KIN MARRIES 

C0HA8SET, Mass., June 4. — Margaret 
Barrett Williams, granddaughter of Law- 
rence Barrett, the actor, was married here 
yesterday to Edward Andrew Cnahman 
Murphy, of New York City. The bride 
wore the beautiful family pearls which 
adorned the person of her grandmother 
when she married. 



I. A. T. S. E. OFFICERS CHANGE 
Several changes have been made in the 
staff of organizers of the International 
Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees 
and Motion Picture Operators of the 
United States and Canada, through the 
election of F. G. Lemaster as secretary 
and treasurer and the appointment of 
Chas. C. Crickmore as assistant to Inter- 
national President Cbas. C. Shay. 

James Lemke of Troy, N. Y., has been 
selected to succeed Lemaster as manager 
of organizers and claims in the executive 
offices, and E. A. Clark of Seattle, Wash., 
has been appointed organizer in the place 
of Crickmore. John J. Barry, of Boston, 
will succeed Lemke in the capacity of or- 
ganizer. 

ACTORS DANCE AT FAIR HAVEN 

Red Bank, N. J., June 3. — The nctors 
of the Fair Haven colony gave a dance on 
the Players Boat Club houseboat on the 
Shrewsbury River last night. Among 
those who attended were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Tony Hunting, Ernie Otto, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lew Hunting, Mrs. Joseph Hart, Leo 
Hayes, Bob Hunting, Mrs. Lucy Tory, Mr. 
and Mrs. Knight, Elmer Melrose, Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Rider, James Tenbrook, Frank 
Evans, "Scream" Walsh, Frank North, 
Mat Greig, Mrs. Dan Gracey and Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Otto. 



PHILA WANTS SUNDAY SHOWS 

Pim.ADFXPiirA, June 2. — A bill is before 
the Pennsylvania Legislature which will 
give permission to the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra to give concerts in Philadelphia on 
Sundays with a fee for admission to be 
charged. Heretofore no entertainment of 
any kind could be given in Philadelphia on 
Sundays where an entrance fee is charged. 



FINBERG GOES TO HARTFORD 

Habtfobo, Conn., June 3. — Charles Fin- 
berg, who, for the past two years, has been 
manager of the Grand Theatre, in Trenton, 
linn succeeded Daniel Scullen as director 
of the Spiegel Burlesque bouse in this 
city, and will take charge when it begins 
its new. season in August. 



EMELIE EGAMAR OPERATED ON 

Philadelphia, June 3. — Mrs. William 
O'Brien (Emelie Egamar) underwent an 
operation for the removal of a tumor on 
May 25 at the German Hospital here. She 
is making a good recovery at her home, 242 
North Franklin Street, this city. 



MOTHER SEEKS MABEL MURRAY 

Boston, June 2. — Mabel Murray's 
mother wants to hear from her, as she is 
destitute and can not care for the baby 
left with her. The child will be put in a 
home if Miss Murray is not heard from 
immediately, the mother states. 



ALLEN LEFT ESTATE TO WIDOW 

Charles Leslie Allen, old time actor, and 
the father of Viola Allen Duryea, the 
actress, left an estate of about $10,000 in 
realty and about $1,500 in personal prop- 
erty. It was all willed to his widow, Mrs. 
Sarah J. Allen. 



GIVING AWAY LIBERTY BONDS 

Spbin<;kikij>, Mass., Jnne 2. — The Gold- 
stein Bros., managers of the Broadway 
Theatre, are to give away each week two 
Liberty Loan bonds to the persons draw- 
ing a lucky number. 



LUESCHER JOINS NAVY 

Mark Luescher baa enlisted to look after 
the publicity of the recruiting ship, Recruit, 
anchored in Union Square. He was im- 
pressed into the service on June 3 by 
Lieut. Wells Hawks. 



POU TO BUY LIBERTY BONDS 

Springfield, Mass., June 4. — S. Z. Poll, 
owner of the Poll circuit of theatres, will 
take the entire proceeds of his houses this 
week and invest in Liberty Loan bonds. 



EDDIE LEONARD 
IS ARRESTED ON 

MAID'S CHARGE 

SAYS HE GRABBED HER 



Eddie Leonard, forty-two years old, black 
face comedian, and residing at Reisenweb- 
er's Hotel, was taken into custody by Po- 
liceman Ruben, of Traffic C, last Thursday 
evening, at 989 Eighth Ave., when Belle 
Roche, a maid employed at the hotel, made 
a charge against him. He was taken to the 
West Forty-seventh Street police station, 
where he was booked and later taken to 
the Men's Night Court. 

At the court, Mrs. Roche informed 
Complaint Clerk Michael McKenna that 
she had entered Leonard's room that 
morning and found the comedian in un- 
conventional attire. He then grabbed her 
by the hand, she charged. She said she 
Quickly got away from him and left the 
room. 

That evening, when she returned home, 
she informed her husband of the occur- 
rence, and he Insisted that she have Leon- 
ard arrested. She told McKenna that this 
was the second time Leonard had appeared 
this way wben she entered the room. 

The woman stated that she did not de- 
sire to press the complaint, but that ber 
husband insisted. 

McKenna then stated the facts narrated 
to him to Magistrate Corrigan, who said 
that, as long as she did not care to press 
the matter and would not appear, that the 
complaint would have to be withdrawn. 
That was done, and Leonard was re- 
leased when arraigned. 



JULIETTE DIKA 

The picture adorning the front page of 
this issue of The Clipped is of Miss 
Juliette Dika, who is offering a new sing- 
ing act In vaudeville in which she 1b billed 
as "the only French singing comedienne in 
vaudeville." 

Miss Dika bas appeared in vaudeville 
and musical comedy for several years, and 
has but recently obtained an entirely new 
routine of exclusive songs and gowns, 
aptly called "creations." 

Last season she appeared throughout the 
West and will make her debut at the 81st 
Street Theatre the first half of this week 
(June 4). She will be accompanied at the 
piano by Billy Vnnderveer, the composer, 
who has furnished ber with some of the 
new songs. The act is under the direction 
of Claude and Gordon Bostock. 



OPEN WITH BURLESQUE STOCK 

Milwaukee, Wis., June 3. — Joe and 
Kathryn Murray opened today at the Em- 
press Theatre with Matt Kolb's Burlesque 
Stock Co. for the Summer. 



MADISON WRITES BURLESQUE 

James Madison is writing a burlesque 
show which Ben Welch expects to use next 
season. 



GLOBE THEATRE HAS FIRE 

A fire in a room adjoining the projec- 
tion booth in the Globe Theatre on Mon- 
day afternoon created considerable excite- 
ment along Broadway. The assistant to 
the picture operator was rewinding a reel 
of the Chapin "Lincoln Cycle," film when 
the celluloid caught fire from a lamp. 
The smoke quickly spread to the thea- 
tre and Manager Harry D. Kline sounded 
the fire signal. Fourteen ushers imme- 
diately got to their fire stations, threw 
open the exit doors and escorted the 
patrons from the theatre. They then be- 
gan work with extinguishers and the hose 
from the standpipes in the theatre and 
by the time the City fire apparatus ar- 
rived the blaze was extinguished. 

LILLIAN DOUGLAS FIRE .VICTIM 

Atlanta, Ga., June 2. — Mr. and Mrs, 
C. Fred Damn (Lillian Douglas) lost their 
home and all Its contents in the fire which 
swept Atlanta May 21. Their loss was 
partly covered by insurance. They are 
temporarily residing at 153 Central avenue 
and wish their friends to communicate with 
them and append their addresses, as the 
list which they had was destroyed. 

O'HARA TO HAVE NEW PLAY 

Fiske O'Hara will begin his next season's 
tour under the direction of Augustus Piton, 
in a new play entitled "The Man from 
Wicklow." 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



BURLESQUE SHOWS NEED NOT 
FEAR AN Y TRAN SIT TROUBLE 

With Exception of Grand Trunk System, All Lines Will Carry 

A. B." C Shows Next Season as in the Past, and Have 

Assured Managers That There Will Be No Delay 



With tbe exception of one line, all rail- 
roads in the United States and Canada 
have promised to transport the shows on 
the American Burlesque Circuit from 
point to point without delay during next 
season. This assurance was given by Pres- 
ident George Peck, of the Circuit, at a 
meeting of burlesque producing and the- 
atre managers held last Monday. 

The Grand Trunk system was the one 
exception, it stating that it would make 
no definite promise in this respect, al- 
though it was quite likely from present 
indications that there would be no delay. 

There were about forty managers pres- 
ent at tbe meeting, many of them coming 
from distant points to attend. 

The purpose of the meeting was to oat- 
line the policy of the circuit for the coming 
season. President Peck, who presided, in- 
formed the managers that they must give 
clean shows, and those that had comedians 
who were inclined to be a bit too sug- 
gestive must see that they hold themselves 
within bounds. He told the managers he 
would depend upon them for their assist- 
ance in this matter by calling to his atten- 
tion any improper or suggestive business. 

The schedule of the shows has been ar- 
ranged differently for next season, and in 
such a manner that there will be a week's 
lay-off for each one in both the East and the 
West This has been done for the purpose 
of allowing any show that may not meet 
with the requirements of the Censor Com- 
mittee to lay off without interfering with 
the regular route of the circuit. Where 
a show is required to lay off to be fixed 
up, the one which is laying off regularly 
will be put in to play the engagement that 
week. 

If the show is not up to tbe requirements 
of the committee after the rebuilding 
process, its franchise will be cancelled and 
another company substituted. 



Another important matter taken up was 
the complaint of managers that theatres 
are not posting all the paper sent them by 
the shows. Mr. Peck informed them that 
he would instruct tbe house managers to 
furnish a list of all their locations to 
agents, who could then check them up. 
Should complaints then be made of paper 
not being put up, Mr. Peck will take steps, 
he said, for an accounting from the local 
managers. 

With reference to the shipment of paper 
and billing, Mr. Peck stated that most of 
the railroads had placed an embargo on all 
freight, bo that it would be advisable in 
the future to ship all matter by express. 
The charges for such will double that of 
freight. 

Besides President and General Manager 
Peck and Assistant General Manager Will- 
iam V. Jennings, those in attendance were : 
I. Weingarden, of Chicago; Charles B. 
Taylor, Al. Lubin, Sol. Myers, Morris 
Wainstock, Tom D. Sullivan, It. Zeisler, 
Dan Guggenheim, Louis Epstein, Majestic 
Theatre, Scranton ; Maurice Jacobs, Sammy 
Clark, Billy Vail, Lew Talbot, Charles F. 
Donoghue, Charles M. Baker, Henry Pat- 
rick Dixon, I. H. Herk, Chicago : Charles 
Robinson, B. T. Beatty, Chicago ; Dr. G. E. 
Lothrop, Howard Theatre, Boston; T. W. 
Gerhardy, Detroit ; Sam Levy, Detroit ; 
Dave Kraus, George Stroud, Savoy The- 
atre, Hamilton, (Int.; J. J. Lake, Teddy 
Simons, T. W. Dinkins, Louis Kreig, Gay- 
ety Theatre, Brooklyn ; Harry Hastings, 
Michael Joyce, Star Theatre, Brooklyn; 
W. S. Campbell, Harry Hart, Cincinnati; 
H. It. Lefebore, Orpheum Theatre, New 
Bedford, Mass. ; Charles Barton, Joe 
Hurtlg, Charles Franklyn, Harry Strouse, 
W. S. Clark, Gayety Theatre, Baltimore; 
Joe Walsh, Gayety Theatre, Philadelphia, 
and Bobby Morrow, Trocodero Theatre, 
Philadelphia. 



TO APPEAR WITH LAMBS' GAMBOL 

Tbe program of the Lambs' Gambol at 
the Manhattan Opera House will include: 
"Gals First," a musical revue by Ray 
Goetz and It. H. Burnside ; Clifton Craw- 
ford, as "Her Soldier Boy" ; Carl Randall, 
representing "Miss Springtime" : Ralph 
Cameron, "Tbe Century Girl," Donald Mc- 
Donald, "The Little Lady in Blue"; Earl 
Benbam, "Cinderella," and Creighton Hale, 
"Shirley Kaye." 



MME. YORSKA PRESENTS "JENNY" 

A play entitled "Jenny" was presented 
by Madama Yorska on Monday afternoon 
' for the benefit of the Actors' Fund of 
America in the Comedy Theatre. Those 
who appeared in the cast are Cecil Owen, 
Leonard Ide, Edmund Goulding, Marc 
Lobell, Loye Arnold, Josephine Morse, 
Harriet Brent and Jean Acker. 



ACTRESS HAS NO BANK ACCOUNT 

Jeanette Young was examined on Monday 
following a judgment obtained against her 
by Peter S. Clark, manager of tbe "New 
York Girl" company, of which she had been 
prima donna. She told the court that she 
was now earning $40 a week with the act 
of Brown, Harris and Brown, playing tbe 
Loew time. She said that no one owed her 
any money and that ber jewelry comprised 
a $9 watch and a breast pin which be- 
longed to her sister. She also declared she 
had no bank account. 



LEAVITT TO WRITE BURLESQUE 

Abe Leavitt has been engaged by Jacobs 
4 Jormon to supply the book for the new 
"Million Dollar Dolls" show on the Colum- 
bia Circuit next season. Leavitt supplied 
the material for this show last season. 



SCENIC ARTIST DIES 

Little Rock, Ark., Jone 2.— Albert N. 
Martin, 50 years old, a scenic artist, died 
in his home here as a result of an operation 
for appendicitis. A widow and one child, 
a daughter four years old, survive him. 



FRANCES STARR TO BE "SERVIA" 
Frances Starr will impersonate "Servia" 
in Louis N. Parker's play "The Masque 
of Peace and War," when it Is presented 
at the Century Theatre next month. 



WOX PRODUCE "THE SLACKER" 

A play entitled "The Slacker," by 
James Montgomery, is to be produced by 
Cohan & Harris next season. 



KEMBLE LEASES SHORE HOTEL 

Wm. Kemble, who has leased the 
Brighton Beach Music Hall for the sum- 
mer, has also closed a contract for the 
Brighton Beach Hotel, and plans to open 
it June 15. 

Among the attractions which Mr. Kim- 
ble will offer will be a high class revue, 
headed by Marie Lavarre, assisted by 
ten principles and forty girls, and pro- 
duced under the direction of Andre 
Sherri. A forty-piece orchestra in the 
Green Room will be another attraction, 
while a band of fifty pieces will play on 
the veranda. A large force of men are 
now busy,, remodeling and redecorating 
the place. " 



"FORT GEORGE" LOSES LICENSE 

The old amusement resort, known as 
Fort George, and located on upper Am- 
sterdam Avenue, will be a thing of the 
past after next September. License Com- • 
missioner George H. Bell refused to grant 
a license for the 1918 year to the Speed- 
way Amusement Co., who operate a carou- 
sel and Ferris wheel on the premises. The 
refusal was based upon the protest of 
property holders against the place. 



"HE AND SHE" IS REHEARSING 

"He and She," Rachel Crofter's new 
play, has been placed in rehearsal by Cohan 
& Harris and will receive its premiere 
June 25 at the Apollo Theatre, Atlantic 
City. The company includes Effie Shan- 
non, Maclyn Arbuckle, Marion Barney, 
Jane Cooper. Mrs. Willis Steell, Thurlow 
Bergen, Clyde Fogel, Beatrice Prentice and 
Bertram Miller. 



THE INNER MAN PRODUCED 

Albany, N. Y., June 4. — "The inner 
Man," a comedy drama in a prologue and 
three acts, by Abraham Schomer, was 
presented here tonight by -the Shuberts at 
Harmanas Bleecker Hall. Wilton Lackaye 
plays the leading role and is assisted by 
Adelaide O'Connor in: the leading feminine 
part • ■' 



UNION LABOR TO BUY THEATRE 

Oklahoma City, Okla., June 2. — The 
Tucker Brothers have secured an option for 
tbe purchase from Mayor Ed. Overholser. 
of the Overholser Theatre building and 
contents, booking franchise, name and good 
will, and will take over the property Sept, 
15, opening with road shows. A corpora- 
tion under the name of the Overholser 
Theatre Amusement Co., with $300,000 
capital, has been formed, and the stock will 
be sold mainly to union labor men and their 
friends, to insure a union bouse. 



"RAMBLER ROSE" FOR CAWTHORN 

Julia Sanderson and Joseph Hawthorn 
are to appear next season in a new musi- 
cal comedy entitled, "Rambler Rose," 
under the direction of the Charles Froh- 
man Company. The music for the show 
is by Victor Jacobi and tbe book by 
Harry Smith who collaborated on "Sybil" 
in which they appeared with Donald 
Brian, this season. 



ZANFT RETURNS FROM TRIP 

John Zanft, general manager of the Will- 
iam Fox circuit of theatres and special pro- 
ductions, returned Saturday from a visit 
to Chicago and the middle West, where 
he had been visiting tbe theatres exhibit- 
ing the Kellennann picture "A Daughter of 
the Gods" and "The Honor System." 



STRAND DRESSES FOR SUMMER 

Manager R. Alfred Jones, of the Strand 
Theatre, inaugurated the summer season 
on Sunday when all of the house em- 
ployees appeared in their new summer 
uniforms. The house interior is also 
adorned with its summer upholstery. 



PEARL RAYMOND TAKE NOTICE 

There is an important letter for Pearl 
Raymond, formerly with Weber's Parisian 
Widows Co. at The Clipper office, which 
will be forwarded upon tbe receipt of her 

address. 



LILLIAN DOHERTY'S HUSBAND DIES 

Joseph H. Boring, formerly the husband 
of Lillian Doherty, of the Doherty Sisters, 
died last week at St. Mary's Hospital, 
Brooklyn, from pneumonia, after an illness 
of only a few days. 



"PETER IBBETSON" TO CLOSE 
"Peter Ibbetson" closes its run at the 
Republic Theatre a week from next Sat- 
urday night. It will resume early in 
August. 



ALLEN DOONE BACK 

Allen Doone, with bis Australian com- 
pany will open the season at the Thirty- 
ninth Street Theatre in August, presenting 
a new Irish comedy. 



IRVING COOPER IS A FATHER 

The wife of Irving Cooper, formerly Rae 
Probstein, secretary to William Fox, 
presented him with a baby girl on Decora- 
tion Day. 



VAN AND SCHENCK JOIN "FROLIC" 

Van and Schenck last Monday made 
their first appearance with the "Midnight 
Frolic" atop the New Amsterdam The- 
atre. 



KENO TO REPLACE VAN 

Joe Keno will replace Billy B. Van in 
Henry W. Savage's production, "Have a 
Heart." 



CHARLES E, KOHL IS DEAD 

Ocosoiiowoc, Wis., June 2. — Charles E. 
Kohl, president of the Palace and Majestic 
theatre companies, Chicago, and vice-presi- 
dent of the Western Vaudeville Association, 
died here Monday night from mental col- 
lapse and heart disease, according to the 
verdict of the Coroner. There was some 
mystery about his death, it having been 
claimed that be has been beaten. Kohl 
went insane, brooding over the war. He 
surrendered his commission as Second Lien- 
tenant in the Wisconsin National Guard re- 
cently. Monday morning be ran through 
the streets of Chicago, shouting tbat he had 
been shot and was taken to a sanitarium. 



ADA REHAN LEFT $209,000 

According to an appraisal just filed, the 
net estate of Ada Rehan, the actress, who 
died Jan. 8, 1910, amounts to $200,530. 
The assets include property in New York, 
Montauk and Eostbampton, personal prop- 
erty of $97,28(1, stocks and bonds valued 
at $25,174. said to be in England and sub- 
ject to a war tax ; interest in copyrights, 
and $4,694 as the balance of the account 
from tbe estate of Augustin Daly. 



FRIARS ELECT OFFICERS 

At the annual election of officers of the 
Friar's Club last week tbe following were 
elected : George M. Cohan, abbott ; John 
H. Gleason, dean ; Robert Campbell, sec- 
retary, and Walter C. Jordan, treasurer. 
Irving Berlin, Channing Pollock, Ralph 
Trier, Edwin G. Burns, D. Frank Dodge 
and Frank Tinney were elected governors 
for a term of two years. 



"THE VERY IDEA" CO. COMPLETE 

Tbe company engaged by G. M. Ander- 
son and L. Lawrence Weber for "'The 
Very Idea" includes : Robert Emmet 
Keane, Sidney Shields, Harold Hiudee, Leo 
Stark, Josephine Drake, Belle Daube and 
Jennie Dickerson. Rehearsals began last 
Monday under the direction of W. H. 
Gilmore. 



SAMMIS TO MANAGE HOUSE 

Pittsbubou, Pa., June 2. — George W. 
Sammis, theatrical manager and producer, 
will be manager of the Shenley Theatre 
when it opens for tbe season on Septem- 
ber 24. The opening attraction will be 
the Aborn Opera Company, which will 
give an extended season of comic and light 
opera. 



ACTOR'S WIDOW IS APPOINTED 

Mrs. Genevieve V. Stewart, widow of 
Melville Stewart, the actor and opera 
singer, was appointed by Surrogate Co- 
halan as administratrix of bis estate, last 
week. Victor A. Rettich, a brother of the 
actor, opposed the appointment. He songht 
to have himself substituted. 



POSTPONES "HITCHY-KOO" 

Raymond Hitchcock and E. Ray Uoetz's 
musical show "Hitch y Koo," which was 
to have opened at the Cohan & Harris 
Theatre last Monday, will have its New 
York presentation tomorrow night. 

STELLA HAMMERSTEIN SUES 
Mrs. Stella Hammerstein Keating, 
daughter of Oscar Hammerstein, is seek- 
ing a legal separation from ber husband, 
Frederick L. C. Keating, an attorney, al- 
leging cruel treatment. 



MANAGER GIVEN COMMISSION 

La Crosse, Wis., May 29. — Assistant 
Manager Edwin Schwalbe, of the Majestic 
Theatre, here, bas received a commission 
in the Officers' Reserve, and has gone to 
Fort Sheridan. 



"THE KNIFE" TO RUN ON 

The production of Eugene Walter's play, 
"Tbe Knife," will continue throughout the 
summer at the Bijou Theatre. Robert 
Edeson is playing the title role in the 
piece. 



MANAGER WINS 32ND DEGREE 

' Harry Jackson, acting manager of the 
"Have a Heart" Co., became a thirty-sec- 
ond degree Mason last Thursday night. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 




HOUDINI IWINS 

DISPUTE WITH 

RIGOLETTO 

N. V. A. SAYS NEEDLE TRICK IS HIS 

Claiming that other acts have been 
using his India needle trick, and that it 
is his by right of priority, Harry Hondini 
brought the matter to the attention of 
the arbitration board of the National 
Vaudeville Artists last week_ and won a 
decision, bo far as that body is concerned. 
The board has referred the matter to the 
Vaudeville Managers' Protective Associa- 
tion with a recommendation that that 
body prohibit any other act than Houdini 
from using this trick on the vaudeville 
stage. 

It is said that the action was insti- 
gated when Hondini learned that Rigo- 
letto was doing practically the same 
trick in the Loew houses, and that "the 
handcuff king" decided to bring the mat- 
ter to a head. It has been claimed' by 
others doing the trick that the needle 
stunt is as old as Methuselah, and that 
no act could claim its priority unless they 
went back through more than a score of 
years. 

It is just *>■" that Houdini seems to 
have done, for the National Vaudeville 
Artists' Arbitration Board, in making its 
decision upon the matter, declared that 
the trick belongs to Houdini because it 
had been used by him as much as thirty 
years ago, and that Houdini has been 
doing the trick so long and so often that 
it has become inseparably connected 
with him in the vaudeville field. Any 
other act, therefore, using this trick is, 
in the estimation of the board, stealing 
Houdisi's fire. 

Rigoletto and any other performer 
using the needle trick will most likely be 
asked to eliminate it from their act by 
the Vaudeville Managers' Protective As- 
sociation when it hands down a decision 
in the matter. 



BECK ENCAGES ANGLIN 
Margaret Angliu has been engaged by 
Martin Beck for a tour of the Orpheum 
Circuit, to commence the early part of next 
month. She is to present "Liberty 
Aflame," the sketch in which Julia Arthur 
appeared at the Palace Theatre last week. 
She will also present several other new 
playlets while touring the circuit. 

BIG SPEAKERS AT COLONIAL 

The Colonial Theatre is being visited by 
the following speakers this week, who will 
urge the Colonial patrons to buy Liberty 
Bonds: William Harmon Black, James E. 
Wallace, Senator Robt Wagner, William 
A D. Lord, John A. Minton, Jr., and I>r. 
Frank Crane. 



SHOW SIGNS SOPHIE TUCKER 

Sophie Tucker and her Five Kings of 
Syncopation will join the show of Won- 
ders at the Palace, Chicago, on June 25. 
On August 26 she will open at Memphis, 
starting an eighteen week tour of the Or- 
pheum Circuit. 

FRANKIE WADE LEAVES STAGE 

Habtford. Conn., June 2. — Frankie 
Wade, of the "Bride Shop" company, has 
deserted the stage to settle down here. 
She was recently married to Bernard 
Broadhurst, manager of the Bond Hotel 
in this city. 



DOOLEY A RUGEL TO MARRY 
Dooley and Rngel intend to be booked 
to each for life, it is announced, and the 
wedding is scheduled to take place in 
Philadelphia en June 15. 



DOOLEY & RUGEL QUIT GARDEN 

Dooley and Rugel have tendered two 
weeks' notice to the Shuberts Winter Gar- 
den management and are pondering over 
the pleasant dilemma as to whether to 
accept a vaudeville offer on big time or an 
engagement with the new Mitzi Hajos 
show which Henry W. Savage is going to 
put out. Both offers are said to have $500 
per week attached to them. 



"BAND BOX REVUE" HAS ROUTE 

Gus Edward's new "Band Box Revue," 
which is now making its appearance in 
the New York theatres, has been routed for 
a tour of the Orpheum Circuit, opening at 
the Orpheum Theatre, St Paul, on August 
19. Edwards anticipates placing several 
other acts over the circuit during the next 
season. 



ACTOR ALIENS 

MUST GET 

PERMITS 

MANY OBSTACLES IN THEIR WAY 



MERCEDES LORENZ ENGAGED 

Mercedes Lorenz, now appearing in the 
Henderson Revue at Coney Island, has 
been engaged by Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle 
to appear opposite him in a series of pic- 
tures, beginning the latter part of August. 

Miss Lorenz was formerly a member of 
the vaudeville team of Duffy & Lorenz. 



RANDELL AND MEYERS BOOKED 

Carl Randell and Ernestine Meyers .have 
obtained, through M. S. Bentham, a 20 
week route over the Orpheum Circuit. 
They will open their engagement on -July 
1, at the Orpheum Theatre, San Fran- 



ST. JAMES BACK IN VAUDE 

Will St. James, who appeared under 
the Frobman management in "Our Mrs. 
McChesney," for the past two years, has 
returned to vaudeville. He is appearing 
in a one act comedy, "The Wife Chaser." 



GLADYS LANE TO STAR 

Gladys Lane, who is being featured tbU 
season in the Jansen fashion act, will be 
starred next season in a musical produc- 
tion under the direction of Arthur Pearson. 



Male performers of Teuton birth who 
have failed to take out citizenship papers 
in the United States are going to find 
their lot a hard one now that the barred 
zones for aliens law has been put into 
effect. The law will make it impossible 
for many German and Austrian perform- 
ers to fulfill their engagements and will 
cause them an endless amount of hard- 
ship and annoyance. 

"So enemy male alien will be .allowed 
to play any theatre in Brooklyn without 
first receiving a permit from me," states 
United States Marshal James A. Power 
of Brooklyn. "This does not apply to the 
women but the men who have been born 
in enemy territory and have failed to be- 
come citizens of the United States will 
be immediately arrested if they attempt 
to play engagements in any theatre in 
the Borough of Brooklyn without first 
receiving a permit to do so." 

This edict not only applies to Brook- 
lyn but can be taken as a nationwide 
law. Alien subjects are going to be 
closely watched, and are going to find it 
very difficult to travel from one place to 
another. 

It is suggested by Marshal Power that 
any alien in donbt as to his status make 
inquiries at a United States Marshal's 
office rather than break the law and find 
themselves suddenly under arrest. 

This ruling will make it almost im- 
possible' for a German, who is, for in- 
stance, informed on Saturday that he is 
to play a certain house on the following 
Monday to receive his permit in time to 
appear. 




WILLIAM HALLEN AND ETHEL HUNTER 

a skit they call "Just for Fun" in which Miss Hunter plays a violin unusually 
wall and Sir. Halles is given some excellent opportunities to display his ability as a 
comedy sons- artist at B. F. Keith's Riverside Theatre, this week. 



LEVY STILL BOOKING 

Joe Levy, of the Mark Levy offices, who 
enlisted in the 60th Regiment last week 
and is stationed to guard the State Ar- 
senal, still thinks of booking. Last week, 
he ensnared two recruits for Uncle Sam, 
one being George Sofranski, the vaude- 
ville manager of Thalheimer & Sofranski, 
and the other John Curtin, employed in a 
booking agency. 

VINE AND TEMPLE GET 36 WEEKS 

Vine and Temple, who recently closed 
a thirty-six weeks' engagement on the West- 
ern Vaudeville Circuit, will open on the 
Pontages time at Minneapolis, July l. 
They will break their jump with one week 
at Cleveland and Detroit and two weeks 
' in Chicago, commencing next Monday. 

BOSTOCK TRIAL JUNE 28 

Gordon Bostock, the vaudeville producer 
who was arraigned in the Court of Special 
Sessions on a charge of assault preferred 
by Nathan Jockolo, a theatrical manager, 
pleaded not guilty to the charge last 
week. He was released in $200 bail to 
appear for trial June 28. 

"COl.FFNS" BECOMING CITIZENS 

Aubaht, N. Y., June 2. — Imeida Vale 
and Anet Daunt Golden, of Tralee, Ireland, 
and Florence Rush, of Dublin, members of 
the Louise Agnese Irish Coleens, have re- 
ceived their first citizenship papers at the 
office of the County Clerk in this city. 



LEE CHAPIN ENLISTS 

Lee Chapin, formerly with one of Ger- 
trude Hoffman's vaudeville acts, enlisted 
in the United States Medical Corps a 
few weeks ago. He is attached to Re- 
cruiting Company 18 at Fort Ethan Allen, 
Vermont. 



"HIT THE TRAIL" BOOKED 

John B. Hymer's act, "Hit the Trail," 
will trail along the Orpheum Circuit be- 
ginning July 1, for a period of twenty 
weeks, starting at the Orpheum, San Fran- 
cisco. 



TEAM HAS ANNIVERSARY 

Adelaide and Hughes disappointed the 
National Vaudeville Artists benefit on Son- 
day night, but bad a good alibi, it being 
their fourth wedding anniversary. 



ACTOR TURNS PRESS AGENT 
S. Alverdo, who had the vaudeville act 
of Alverdo's Trained Goats and Dogs, is 
now doing the publicity work for the 
Beam Aviation School at Selina, Ohio. 

ORPHEUM BOOKS NAN HALPERN 

A route over the Orpheum Circuit has 
been provided Nan Halpern, who will begin 
her season at the Majestic Theatre, Chi- 
cago, on August 26. 



WILLIE EDELSTEIN INJURED 

Willie Edelstein, the vaudeville agent, 
was injured on Decoration Day by a motor 
cycle, and is now suffering from severe in- 
juries to his bead. 



FOX A HARDEN HAVE NEW ACT 

Jimmy Fox and Florence Harden have 
a new vaudeville act entitled, 
Ha PP7>" written by Thomas Gray. 



"Too 



IRENE FRANKLIN DONT FEAR 13 

Irene Franklin, who has a birthday on 
June 13, has been presented with a Packard 
touring car by her husband. 



TEAM HAS NEW ACT 

Regal and Bender will initiate their new 
act at the Royal on June 25. It has been 
written by James Madison. 



LOWE MARRIES SAHARET 

Maxim P. Lowe, the agent, and Sahsret, 
the dancer, were married very quietly «= 
June 2. 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




COLONIAL 

A bill which starts with much more 
speed than it ends with, owing to an ex- 
ceptionally long and tedious act of Char- 
lotte Parry's, in next to the closing spot, 
was opened by the Gladiators on Monday 
night 

These two athletes give a splendid ex- 
hibition of strength and gymnastics, and 
possess everything that goes to make good 
is the initial spot. They went through 
their routine with a precision that can be 
likened only to perfect clock work, and 
scored big. 

Marie Stoddard presents what she terms 
"a vaudeville caricature." In her opening 
gong number she confides to the audience 
her impression of vaudeville, and then 
goes ahead, in the rest of her songs, show- 
ing how several kinds of vaudeville acts ' 
appear to her. Her impressions embrace 
a considerable scope, ranging all the way 
from a ballad singer to a monologist. All 
are well done. Her act is quite a novelty. 

George Hermann and Marion Shirley 
present a comedy novelty entitled "The 
Mysterious Masquerader." 

The act is made entertaining through 
the contortionist antics of the skeleton and 
by an extremely clever skeleton dance, 
which stands ont as the feature of the act. 
The agility with which the man dances is 
wonderful, and his work is a masterpiece 
of its kind. The effect would be . even 
better, however, with a more subdued light, 
so that the black tights would be less vis- 
ible to eye, while the "bones" would stand 
out more prominently. 

Percy Bronson and Winnie Baldwin 
were accorded a gratifying reception at the 
conclusion of their "1917 Songology." This 
pair probably realize by now that the latter 
part of their act is better liked and should 
take this hint and cut down considerable 
of the "souse" part and solo work in the 
beginning. Their duets were the numbers 
that came in for the most applause, and 
their Hawaiian finish cleaned up for them. 
Bronson should abandon his "souse" take- 
off before he starts his solo number, for 
the audience has had more than sufficient 
of it by that time. 

Bronson has a splendid voice, and should 
employ it more during the act The girl 
might improve her work by making; more 
use of the stage, for she has splendid pos- 
sibilities, and only needs to unbend her- 
self and move around more. 

A breeze from the Golden Gate was in- 
jected into the proceeding by the California 
Boys' Band, comprising thirty-eight mem- 
bers of the Columbia Park Boy's Club of 
San Francisco. Although there have been 
better bands in vaudeville, the work of the 
-boys is more than passable, and what they 
might lack in technique they make up in 
youthful spirit. Their march formations are 
very pleasing to the eye, bnt the revolving 
spot light is not necessary, and the march 
would have greater effect with a bright, 
steady light. The lads also do some clever 
gymnastic feats, which were warmly ap- 
plauded. 

Dr. Frank Crane, of the New York 
Globe, delivered a stirring, straight-from- 
the-shoulder talk on Liberty bonds during 
intermission. 

Jack Alfred and company opened inter- 
mission with their unique acrobatic skit, 
"Smile," and scored heavily. They are for- 
tunate in possessing the .happy combina- 
tion of good material and sure fire gym- 
nastic feats. 

Phil Kelly and Joe Galvin proved to 
be the laughing hit of the bin, and will 
receive a more detailed review under "New 
Acts." 

Charlotte Parry, in "Song Stories of 
the City," will also be reviewed under 
"New Acts." 

The show was closed by Van and 
Sehenck. who sang a number of popular 
melodies in first class style, the darky 
dialect number scoring particularly welL 
The pair harmonize excellently, and know 
all the rudiments that go to make success- 
ful popular songsters. H. G. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on page* I and a) 



RIVERSIDE 

Louis Hart, opening the show, has made 
of what in other .hands might be but a 
fair strong man turn, an act of much 
merit, one which could easily hold down 
a late spot on almost any bill. Hart, a 
medium sized young man of rather slight 
build, dressed in evening clothes enters 
his library and sitting down at the table 
falls asleep and dreams that he, a weak- 
ling, is possessed of great strength. He 
then proceeds to perform a number of 
feats which are little short of marvelous, 
and at their completion falls asleep and 
finds that all was but a dream. 

Dunbar's Darkies, a colored quartette, 
sang a number of the old time plantation 
Melodies with Fine affect. The men's 
voices blend nicely and the songs of be- 
fore the wax pleased greatly. The big 
bass of the quartette has a great natural 
voice rich in quality and wide in range. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Wilde, with their 
animated shadowgraphs, have an act that 
is at least interesting. Mr. Wilde being 
particularly proficient in his work. 

William Hallen and Ethel Hunter's 
clever skit, "Just for Fun," scored one of 
the hits, of the bill. Mr. Hallen is a 
clever comedian and Miss Hunter plays 
the violin well.. The act will be reviewed 
under "New Acta." . 

Gub Edwards' Bandbox Revue, featuring 
Georgie Price and Cuddles Edwards, closed 
the first part, and the dainty minature 
musical comedy with its talented juvenile 
cast met with much favor. The musical 
numbers of the piece are particularly good 
and the dancing well executed. Vincent 
ODonnell's "Bida Pagliacci," although re- 
ceived with considerable enthusiasm, could 
be dispensed with. For some reason, 
Casio's tragic song seems out of .place in 
a revue. The patriotic finale brought the 
act to a rousing finish. 

Adele Rowland, singing her entire reper- 
toire of songs which she used when she 
entered vaudeville a few weeks ago, found 
many friends in the big Monday nigbt 
audience. She bills herself as a singer 
of "story" songs, but is at her best in 
the melody numbers and "Hearin' from 
Erin" was enthusiastically applauded. A 
little more care in her enunciation wonld 
greatly aid her in putting' over the 
"story" numbers, which depend more upon 
the lyric than the melody. The "LUy" 
song builds the act up to a strong finish 
and at its completion Miss Rowland was 
compelled to announce that her entire 
repertoire of songs had been rendered. 

The laughing honors of the bill went 
to Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie Barry, whose 
rube sketch is filled to the brim with 
humor. The story of the country boy 
who had bought a front seat at every 
performance of a musical play just to 
hear the prima donna sing and finally 
bouquet in hand, makes his way to the 
stage door, confesses his love for the 
singer, only to learn that she is happily 
married is most amusingly told. The 
singer and door man who poked a lot 
of fun at the boy but found at the finish 
that he was not such a "rube" after all 
as the laugh is turned on the "wise" city 
dwellers. . 

Frederick V. Bowers in bis scenic song 
revile did well in the late spot of clos- 
ing. Assisted by a good quartette he is 
singing a number of his old songs and 
one or two new ones. The Hawaiian num- 
ber was received particularly welL In 
addition to the quartette there is assist- 
ing Mr. Bowers, Beatrice Priece, and John 
Foley, a star dancer in the days of the 
big Primrose and Dockstader minstrels, 
who in a neat dancing number scored a 
Mt all by himself. A new patriotic num- 
ber closed the act. , W. V. 



PALACE 

The show this week runs more to the 
spectacular than to comedy and, therefore, 
Is but mildly entertaining. 

Julia Arthur was held over for a second 
week with "Liberty Aflame," written by 
Roland Burke Hennessy and sponsored in 
vaudeville by A. Paul Keith and E. F. 
Albee. The act closed the first part, which 
was minus of any real laughable act 
worth mentioning. 

Before intermission were Meeban's dogs, 
which opened the show in good style, offer- 
ing a novelty in animal training. They 
started with the parlor tricks of the woolly 
dogs and went down to the big jumping 
bounds, which have gained the act whatever 
prestige it has. It seems advisable at this 
time, to call attention to the fact that, 
outside of one selection, the music in the 
act is the same as when presented here 
three years ago. The opening of the act is 
slow, but the finish is handled in good show- 
manlike style. 

Shaw and Seabury have endeavored to 
get out of the beaten path of the regula- 
tion two people dancing act, and have ac- 
complished it only in the eccentric dancing 
of the young man. The act is more fully 
reviewed under "New Acts." 

Mllo, with his off-stage singing entrance, 
had no easy matter of it, on account of the 
familiarity of his material. He has not 
changed a word or gesture since the act 
was originally shown here, even including 
his song, which is as old as the act. His 
imitations, however, were accorded a kindly 
reception, and his mocking-bird finish let 
him off nicely. 

In the fourth spot was Julia Arthur, 
with her splendid appeal to the young men 
of America to preserve our liberty. The 
act went over in great style, scoring all the 
way with its patriotic appeal. 

After intermission Florence Moore and 
her brother Frank clowned about for 
thirty-three minutes to what proved to be 
the hit of the show. They have interpo- 
lated several new bits of comedy business 
which comes in for big laughter, and a 
new array of song numbers was finely 
handled. Miss Moore has further enhanced 
the value of the act with a new wardrobe. 
That is worthy of comment. So many acts 
return to the Palace with the same ma- 
terial and wardrobe that a turn which 
gets out of the rut attracts notice. As 
an encore bit. Miss Moore recited a poem 
about "The Liberty Loan" which was finely 
appreciated. 

Conroy and Le Moire opened in one 
with their black-face act, and then finished 
in full stage. The act is called "For Sale — 
A Ford." It lacks the spontaneous humor 
of their former vehicles, and will be more 
fully reviewed under "New Acts." 

Harry Carroll and a piano occupied the 
next to closing spot. Carroll did well with 
his. last two numbers, both of which were 
practically new to the theatre. He sang 
about seven songs, one of which was a 
medley that made the act run a little too 
long. Carroll seems to be straining his 
voice, especially in the ballad numbers, and 
could achieve much better results with a 
shorter act. 

Fire Commissioner Robert Adamson was 
next interpolated into the performance, 
after a formal introduction by Mayor 
Mitchel's secretary. The Commissioner 
spoke about the sale of Liberty Bonds in 
detail, and was attentively listened to and 
roundly applauded. 

"The Forest Fire," with its dap-trap 
dramatics, poor cast and spectacular set- 
ting, told a story uninterestingly in the 
closing spot. The act could not hold the 
crowd, which sauntered out in great num- 
bers before it was much more than half 
way through. S. L. H. 



ROYAL 

Belle Baker owns the show at the Royal 
this week. On Monday afternoon, with 
considerable new material, she was little 
short of a riot with the Bronxites, and 
now she knows the exact meaning of being 
accorded a Royal reception. Even after 
she had made a speech, thanking the audi- 
ence for their wonderful applause, the 
demonstration continued and she was 
forced to sing yet another number before 
they were willing to allow James Teddy 
to close the show. 

Belle Baker is better than ever, if such 
a thing can be said. She possesses even 
more graciousness and charm than here- 
tofore, if possible. Where other singing 
comediennes would be coarse, Miss Baker 
is refined and polished, and there is prob- 
ably only one Belle Baker when it comes 
to putting over Yiddish novelty numbers. 

The only weak spot in her selection of 
material is her singing of "Ain't You 
Coming Back to Dixie Land?" which is 
not on a par with Dixie songs she has 
used in the past. Although, in her hands, 
anything is bound to pass muster, this 
song is fax from suitable, and we arc sure 
Miss Baker could find a better number of 
the same type. 

Her first few numbers have been writ- 
ten especially for her, and the opening 
one in particular is very good. 

After a Hearst-Pathe News Pictorial, 
Mosher, Hayes and Mosher opened the 
show with their bicycle offering, receiv- 
ing considerable applause for their tricks 

and getting many laughs with the antics 
of their Patsy. 

In the second spot Jack Rollins and 
Nena Norris, in "A Manhattan Night," 
found one of the coldest audiences this 
reviewer has ever seen at the Royal. The 
team will be reviewed under New Acts. 

The Three Chums harmonize well, play 
musical instruments passably and, on the 
whole, have a pleasing turn. Their work, 
however, particularly at the start and 
close of the act, reminds one entirely too 
much of the club quartette that Will 
Oakland featured for several seasons, al- 
though this offering is by no means as 
cleverly worked out as was Oakland's. 

It took the Bowman Brothers to make 
the house really thaw out. These two 
boys have a blackface act of the first 
water. The changing to blackface, in full 
view of the audience, is a clever bit of 
business and was well done. The mem- 
ber of the duo who does this business has 
an exceptionally fine singing voice and 
the Royalists were quick to show their 
appreciation. Ther other member of the 
team is a natural comedian and delivers 
his lines well, besides making a decided 
hit with that "railroad whistle sob" 
which he has cultivated. 

Closing the first half of the bill was 
the Grand Opera Quartette, which will be 
reviewed under New Acts. 

During intermission, J. Harris Brown, 
ex-president of the Bronx Board of 
Trade, made a plea to the audience to 
purchase Librty Bonds. 

Nate Cole, Emily Russell and Frank 
Davis have surrounded a lot of nothing 
with sure fire material and the proper 
personalities to put it over, with the re- 
sult that their comedy skit, "Waiters 
Wanted," ran away with the laughing 
honors of the performance. The idea of 
two convicts looking for work would, at 
first .glance, appear to be anything but 
funny, and yet, in the hands of this 
capable trio, the situation is one continual 
laughing scream. 

Belle Baker followed, after which 
James Teddy, billed as the world's cham- 
pion jumper, closed the show. It is a 
pleasure to watch his graceful leaping, 
accomplished with such apparent ease. 
On Monday afternoon he leaped, without 
interruption, over thirty-three chairs as a 
closing feat to his novel turn. 

A Keystone comedy, "The Maiden's 
Trust," held in a good portion of the 
matinee crowd. H. G. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 




FIFTH AVENUE 

A well arranged bill of entertaining acta 
for the first half of the week drew good 
attendance to the opening show on Mon- 
day. 

In number one position, Bailey and 
Bassitt, man and woman equilibrists, pre- 
sented an excellent act. The woman is 
large and muscular, and does the under- 
standing. She lifts her partner with ease. 
much of their work being hand to hand 
lifts and balances. He does some short- 
arm balances that are very clever. As a 
finish, he does a hand stand and balance 
on a pyramid, formed by building tables 
three high, topped off with six chairs. 
They are clever and graceful performers 
and polled down a well deserved success. 

Fisher, Lucky and Gordon, three men, 
opened as a trio, followed with a dnet and 
returned to the trio. They sing well to- 
gether, and for the most part their songs 
are well selected and put over. There are 
a couple of lines in the last song, how- 
ever, that should be eliminated. They 
rendered a couple of good comedy songs, 
which won laughs. They were so well 
liked that they were compelled to respond 
to two encores. 

Hugh Cameron, Hal Crane and company 
won favor ha a sketch called "Good-bye, 
Good Luck." (See new acts.) 

Helen Trix and Sister Josephine opened 
with a duet. Then Helen renders a solo 
with the orchestra accompanying, and then 
another playing her own accompaniment. 
Two more duets with a dance finish 
brought them a well deserved encore. The 
bills announce that the songs they render 
were written by Miss Trix, but whether 
they are or not the audience liked them, 
and the crowd was not slow in showing 
its approval. 

Louis Simon and company, three men 
and two women, presented their act "Our 
New Chauffeur," and furnished twenty 
minutes of entertainment. The little skit 
tells the story of a young couple on their 
honeymoon who are forced to put up at 
a hotel until they can secure a new chauf- 
feur to replace the one they have dis- 
charged for drunkenness. They are given 
an apartment which has been occupied by 
a wealthy young man on a spree in cele- 
bration of bis escape from a woman his 
father had picked out for him to marry. 
The young wife mistakes him for the new 
chauffeur, and he is under the impression 
he married while he was drunk. The hus- 
band soon disabuses him of this, and the 
young couple, having secured a man, leave. 
The skit is one of the best and funniest 
seen hereabouts for some time, and scored 
a well earned success. 

Gene Greene opened in white face with 
a piano assistant and sang three songs, in 
one of which he introduced novel stunts 
with a lighted cigarette. His assistant 
then played a solo and proved he could 
play. Meantime Gene was Marking up, and 
we next saw him as a sporty young colored 
man. Here he gave a line of good comedy 
patter far and away from the usual cut- 
and-dried stuff, and then went into a song 
of the sunny south. His work was so well 
liked that three encores fell to his lot, 
and even then the audience was not in- 
clined to let him go. He was the great big 
hit of the bill, and scored a success seldom 
earned by a single act. 

The Novelles, man and woman, presented 
a gymnastic act which they called "An 
Artisfs Studio." They perform on Roman 
rings, the woman holding the man for 
most of the stunts. She is saasJH of stature, 
but is a remarkable gymnast. She sus- 
tains her partner with a strap, caught on 
the back of her neck, to which is attached 
a ring on which the man performs. They 
als> do the usual routine of Roman ring 
work. They are clever performers, and the 
lady is pretty of face and form, and is very 
attractive in her full length silver-spangled 
tights. They received fun approval for 
their work. 

The usual feature pictures and pictorial 
dailv news events were shown. E. W. 



AMERICAN 



Mysticism, magic, comedy and song and 
dance were represented on the biU for the 
first three days of the week, with acro- 
batics noticeable for their absence. 

The Valdos, two men, presented a Hindu 
mystic act which accomplished its purpose. 
The Indian cabinet trick and a mystic dial 
constitute the entire act. 

To start proceedings, the magician calls 
two young men onto the stage from the 
audience, as a "committee." He then puts 
his assistant in a bag, which he fastens 
around the man's neck, and places him 
on a chair in the cabinet, the front cur- 
tain of which is drawn. Immediately, three 
hands are seen to protrude from different 
portions of curtains. Several bouquets of 
flowers, including red and white carnations 
and large lilies are then passed from the 
cabinet. The magician throws them to the 
audience. At the finish, the assistant, 
freed from the bag, comes out of the 
cabinet. 

While this is an old trick, it is weQ 
done by this team, who use a cabinet 
made entirely of curtains, instead of the 
usual wooden one. The "committee" fur- 
nished the comedy. 

Nat and Bio Albert had a song and 
dance offering. They are not very strong 
on singing, but what they lack as vocal 
artists is more than made up for by their 
dancing, as they are clever exponents of 
the latter art. 

They open with a song and go into a 
dance. As a finish, they give the dances of 
various nations, including, besides our own, 
that of the French, the Scotch and the 
Irish. They went off to a good hand. 

Valyda and Brazilian Nuts, two men 
and a woman, all colored performers, open 
with a trio. Then follows a piano solo by 
the taller of the two men, and an eccentric 
dance by his partner. Valyda then sings a 
solo, the pianist plays "Listen to the 
Mocking Bird" with doable variations. 
and they fcfcfc strong with a trio. 

They are all capable performers. 
Valyda has a double register contralto 
voice, which she uses well. The pianist 
plays excellently, and the third member of 
the trio has a good tenor voice as wen as 
being a capital dancer. 

Joe Mills and Monroe Lockwood, "the 
HickvQle Rubes," have a good line of 
"yap" patter, which they put over to good 
advantage, winning many laughs. They 
also do some singing, the best' of which 
is the lullaby song, in which the smaller of 
the two yodels. They had to respond to 
an encore. 

The Hirschoff gypsies, fonr men and ■ 
three women do a regulation Russian 
dance act, with a little singing. They are 
an good dancers, but the men are particu- 
larly expert. The act was well liked and 
received a good hand. 

Ray Lawrence fouowed intermission. He 
opens his act by giving a female impersona- 
tion and makes his entrance from the front 
of the house, singing as he comes down the 
aisle. He sings three numbers, one of 
which is an operatic selection, and makes 
two changes of costumes. He then appears 
in a business suit and sings two songs. He 
has a fairly good falsetto voice, but his 
natural voice is best. He' scored a hit. 

Hans Roberts and company, a man and 
two women, presented their act, "Cold 
Coffee." This skit, by Charles Horwitz, is 
weU written, and is fun of good, wholesome 
comedy lines, which win laughs. Roberts, 
as the husband, bears the burden of the 
work and gets the most possible out of his 
lines. His two women assistants lend him 
good aid, and the result is a well presented 
act. The audience showed its appreciation 
by liberal applause at the finish. 

Walter James presented his singing 
tramp act, and semed to please. He sang 
three comedy songs and gave a line of 
patter that caused considerable laughter. 

The Fijiyama Japs, four men, presented 
an act made up of feats of magic and 
stunts usually done by a Jap troupe. 
They are clever performers, and were ac- 
corded hearty approval. E. W. 



JEFFERSON 

A Summer festival bill of ten acts was 
shown. 

Lord and Fuller present a novelty act, 
consisting of a little performing on one 
wheel cycles, singing and violin playing. 
The comedy talk which they keep up while 
doing their feats is very weak, and the turn 
received Uttle recognition. 

The Singing Fisherman rendered several 
songs to fair appreciation. 

"The Tamer," with Mr. and Mrs. Cortex, 
a comedy sketch, wherein a husband cures 
a dissatisfied wife by making her jealous, 
was liked. 

Ronair, Ward and Farron entertained 
with their seaside flirtation. Their line 
of talk was liked and the songs got big ap- 
plause. 

Laveen and Cross, comedy gladiators, are 
a sure cure for the blues. They did a few 
acrobatic stunts, but it was their bur- 
lesque posing and faking that was the hit 
of the act. To all appearances they per- 
form miraculous feats. But, one of them 
is supported by a wire, and their work fur- 
nishes laughs aplenty. 

Josephine Davis got a big reception for 
her rendition of a song repertoire, and she 
was caned upon for an encore. 

Howard and Bailey registered a big 
hit with their comedy act. Their patter 
was put over in rapid sure-fire style, and 
their work was pleasing throughout. The 
marriage ceremony went especiany big. 

"Bon Voyage," a miniature musical 
comedy, had the excellent quality of pos- 
sessing three clever principals. With elimi- 
nations and reconstruction, the act could 
be seen to good advantage over the big 
time. The chorus at present is one of the 
things that stands in the way of making 
this a completely meritorious offering. The 
Spanish scene is in itself worthy of a spot 
in vaudeville. 

Joe Raymond was thoroughly enjoyed 
and went over very big. 

The Gnding O'Mearas offered a neat ex- 
hibition of baHroom dancing, which proved 
acceptable. S. W. 



CITY 

Louise and MitcheU offer a worthy acro- 
batic act. The girl does some difficult 
work, and gave a good demonstration of 
strength, which the audience was not slow 
to appreciate. 

Arthur Geary in piano, songs and re- 
citations, received a big response for each 
number. 

Dorothy Rogers and company will be re- 
viewed under "New Acta." 

Col. Diamond and his granddaughter 
were cordiaHy received with their terp- 
sichorean offering. 

Rod and Robertson, boy and girl, have 
a clever and enjoyable offering. As school 
children they open with a quarrel, and the 
boy explains to the girl how to catch fish, 
she asking many amy questions. It 
evokes laughter, and was liked very much. 
The girl then jumps rope while doing a 
clog dance, and they both do a song and 
dance. They boy has a way of leaning 
forward, his face almost touching the floor, 
without any obvious support, which is a 
scream. 

The Great Howard entertained with his 
ventrfloquial act. He is Doctor Killem. 
and uses two dummies. The talk centers 
about a youngster who comes to have his 
tooth extracted, and his friend, who comes 
to - enjoy the performance. It provides in- 
numerable laughs, not one being missed. 

Thomas Potter Dunn went over very big 
with his comedy song* and character im- 
personations. Bach number was cleverly 
done and met with favor. 

The Dancing Demons, a colored singing 
and dancing quartette, closed the show to 
moderate applause. S. W. 



ZALLAH IS FEATURE 
OF OLYMPIC STOCK 
SHOW THIS WEEK 

Another new show has been put on by 
Rochen and Richards this week at the 
Olympic, with Zallah, the. sensational 
dancer, in a revised set of classic move- 
ments, which seemed to please. 

Morris Perry, in his Hebrew role, 
changed several of his bits, and Jim Pearl. 
who, as an Irishman, depends mainly on 
"mugging," and a wild stare, was well 
placed opposite him. 

Dixie Devere was seen as a French ad- 
venturess, and led several numbers. Drena 
Mack is retained as prima donna, and is in 
excellent voice. 

Laura Houston is the new sonbrette 
and showed her usual vim and vigor in 
impersonations and numbers. 

Earl Sheehan, as a dope fiend ; Sam 
Green, as a waiter, policeman, etc.; Bert 
Fassio, as a "rough and tumble," and Ed. 
Austin, completed the cast. 

The pickout number was a big hit, as 
all the girls selected can do something 
worth while, especially the girl who sang 
"Love Comes a-Staallng." She had to re- 
peat it, and then again at the finish of 
the number. 

Next week "Wine, Woman and Song." 



CHESTNUT THEATRE, PH1LA., SOLD 

Philadelphia, June 2. — The Chestnut 
Street Theatre has been purchased by Ab- 
ner H. Merahon for about $800,000, and 
win shortly make way for a twelve-story 
store and office building to be- erected at 
a cost of $750,000. The theatre had been 
devoted for many years to the highest 
class of productions, under the regime of 
various managers. A couple of decades 
ago the theatre was given over to lighter 
productions and some of the best known 
of the light operas of WiUard Spense had 
their premieres in the house. Later, the 
WiUiams and Proctor interests took over 
the house and managed it until they formed 
a community of interest with the Keith 
vaudeville theatres. 



OFFICERS VISIT ACTORS' HOME 

The annual visit of the officers and 
trustees of the Actors' Fund of America, 
to the Actors' Home in Staten Island, took 
place last Sunday. The delegation was 
headed by Vice-President F. F. Mackey 
and Sam A. Scribner treasurer of the 
fund. Daniel Frohman, president of the 
fund, was unable to attend. 

An entertainment was supplied by 
Louise Dresser, Kutner & Manning, 
Sammy Levy, Harry Hock, Moe Kraus, 
Edward Mortan, Kutner & Manning. The 
25 guests at the home were all present. 

THEATRE FIRE CAUSES PANIC 

Mi. Kisco, N. Y-, June L — A film ex- 
plosion caused a fire in the Mt. Kisco 
Opera House last night, starting a panic in 
which women and children were trampled 
on. One woman was removed from the 
theatre in an unconscious condition, bat 
was quickly revived. Several women 
fainted. When order was finally restored, 
it was discovered that the blaze caused 
Uttle damage. The theatre is a two-story 
frame building and presents motion pic- 
tures only. 



SERVANT IS UNDERSTUDY 

Clara White, colored servant in the em- 
ploy of OUve Wyndham, the actress who 
is now appearing in the leading feminine 
role in "The Knife" at the new Bijou The- 
atre, has been appointed understudy for 
the role of the negro mammy in the melo- 
drama. She appeared at the Garrick The- 
atre as a member of Mrs. Hapgood's Col- 
ored Players. 



CHORUS GIRL MADE PRINCIPAL 

Emily Miles, who has been in the chorus 
of the Winter Garden for four seasons, 
has been made a principal of "The Pass- 
ing Show of 1917." 



LAMBS TO GAMBOL JUNE 17 

The public Lambs' Gambol win take 
place on June 17 at the Manhattan Opera 
House. 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




CHARLOTTE PARRY 

Theatre — Colonial. 
Style — Character tonga. 
Time — Thirty mimutet. 
Setting— Special. 

Charlotte Parry has dressed her new 
act in a very attractive special set, but 
the turn itself is a disappointment, and 
an artistic set cannot cover up the act's 
many defects. The offering is in need 
of considerable revision and reconstruc- 
tion before it can justly claim honors in 
the two-a-day houses. 

It is the impression of this reviewer 
that Miss Parry has attempted entirely 
too much, that she has been given poor 
material to work upon, and is not big 
enough for the work she tries to do. 
Here and there in the act, something 
stands ont as good, but it is lost in the 
hodgepodge of nothing that surrounds it, 
and Miss Parry should lose no time in 
separating the chaff from the wheat. 

The first number is a French song, in 
which seasickness is concerned. The 
song has nothing to recommend it, and 
Miss Parry labors sadly with a French 
accent 

The next number is a gem. It depicts 
a clerk, who adds figures day after day 
for a paltry wage, bat is not too poor 
to cherish day dreams. More of this 
style of number, and Miss Parry would 
have an act worth while. 

The next number about an Hawaiian 
waitress in a cabaret is done poorly, 
although it possesses much merit. An 
Italian dialect number was exceedingly 
difficult to understand. 

A drawn out song-story about a girl 
from Sunnybrook, who comes to the city 
innocent and sweet, but who gradually 
falls to the lowest pits of sin is entirely 
too long and, if its use is to be con- 
tinued, needs to be gone over with a 
fine comb to cut out objectionable bits. 
Its beginning is very pretty, and leads to 
the idea that Miss Parry could score well 
with a simple, little number. But when 
the girl starts on the downward path, the 
idea and certain lines are objectionable. 

A song about an English beggar who 
wishes to join the army gives Miss Parry 
a chance to draw an exceptionally in- 
teresting character, bnt the song comes 
entirely too late in the act. 

The act should be cut down to almost 
half of its present running time, and 
only such impressions as the clerk, the 
beggar, the simple country girl, and 
others of this nature left. H. G. 




AMANDA GRAY AND CO. 

Theatre — D elancey. 

Style — Singing. 

Time— Fourteen minutes. 

Setting— Special 

There are three persons in this act — 
Miss Gray and "her two Southern Boys." 
As far as the audience is concerned, the 
latter pair might just as well have come 
from New England, for they do nothing 
that particularly stamps them as South- 
erners. 

They both appear in white trousers and 
black and white checked coats. Miss 
Gray is dressed attractively. 

The routine of the act consists of a 
nnmber of trios, which seem to please, 
although the three should be more care- 
ful of their harmony. The Lucia rag- 
time selection is sung poorly, and the 
act would be better with this number 
eliminated. 

On Thursday afternoon. Miss Gray, at 
one of ber exits, remarked, "Well, thank 
goodness, that much is over!" so plainly 
that it was audible in the seventh row. 
Also, several times during the act, the 
three made remarks to each other, pay- 
ing as much attention to themselves as 
to the audience. 

While this reviewer does not know 
whether this attitude on their part was 
habitual or not, it has no place in any 
act H. G. 



THE BRIANS 

Theatre — Delancey. 
Style — Acrobatic novelty. 
Time — Eight minute*. 
Setting— Full stage. 

What appear to be two grotesque 
dummies are asleep at the rise of the 
curtain. One of them comes to life and 
then detaches a fake head from the other 
fellow. Then he screws it on again, all 
of which tends to give the audience the 
impression that the other man is really 
a dummy. 

The act consists of throwing the 
"dummy" all areund the room in all 
sorts of postures, and the part is taken 
off so realistically that the falls and 
general makeup of the dummy member 
of the team are little short of marvelous. 

Of course, at the end, the dummy 
wakes up. 

The act is very diverting, well per- 
formed and should unquestionably be 
seen on the big time. H. G. 



THE LA VARS 

Theatre — Royal. 
Style — Dancing 
Setting— FuU stage. 
Time— Thirteen minutes. 

A jazz band of five pieces plays for 
the La Van, who do a number of ef- 
fective dances. 

The first number is a Cakewalk, which 
the pair do in first-rate style. This is 
followed by a tango dance. 

The band is featured in a selec- 
tion, after which the La Vara do their 
famous whirlwind dance. 

The band then renders another num- 
ber, after which the pair clase with an 
Hawaiian dance. 

The pair are graceful and talented 
dancers, and the music of their band goes 
splendidly with their work. The team 
have a winner in their new act, and the 
only way it could possibly be improved 
upon would be to close with the whirl- 
wind dance instead of with the Hawaiian 
number. H. G. 



EADIE & RAMSDEN 

Theatre — Royal. 

Style — Contortionist skit. 

Setting — In two and in one. 

Time — Ten minute*. 

After the girl renders a vocal selec- 
tion, she receives Charlie, a caller. He 
sings and follows his number with a 
dance in which he shows himself to be 
a comic contortionist It would be ad- 
visable for him to eliminate the song 
and go right into the dance. 

The two of them then sit on the sofa 
and talk, after which he plays the piano 
while she sings, and the two finish the 
act with a dance. Whether talking, 
playing or dancing, the ' man is always 
doing comic feats of contortion, which 
furnish practically all the fun and nov- 
elty in the act. 

The offering is away from the beaten 
path, and it is well put on.H. G. 



ANDREAS SISTERS 

Theatre — Rialto, Chicago. 

Style — Piano and song. 

Time — Ten minutes. 

Setting — 'In one. 

This is a piano and songs "sister" 
turn 'that has the makings of a good 
act for the family houses, if the Swede 
impersonation of one of the girls is cat 
out and something substituted in its' 
place. They harmonize pleasingly in 
songs, but their work is unbalanced, for 
the reason that the pianist is the per- 
former of the two and also possesses the 
voice of the act T. C. 



HARRY HINES 

Theatre — Proctor's 2Sd Street. 

Style—Single. 

Time — Nineteen minute*. 

Setting — Special 

The act starts in one, Harry Hinea 
singing several songs that are separated 
from each other by a clever monologue. 
One deals with his gladness to be back 
in New York and another ia a comedy 
number about reincarnation. He also 
delivers some confidential stuff about the 
days before he was on the stage. This 
material is sure fire. 

In a special Western saloon set (bur- 
lesqued), he appears as a wrist-watch 
cowboy, and sings a number about his 
life at Dublin Gulch. 

For an encore, he gives a short runny 
speech, followed by a little "nut" stuff. 

The act is the kind that should get 
over nicely on any bill. H. Q. 



BOB & DOROTHY FINDLAY 

Theatre— Proctor's 125th Street. 
Style — Man and girl 
Time — Sixteen minute*. 
Setting— In one. 

This act runs along the customary 
lines of man and girl turns. 

It starts with some cross-fire stuff, 
the girl "kidding" the boy about his ap- 
pearance. They then go for an imag- 
inary automobile ride with an imaginary 
dog named "Hector." 

While the girl changes her costume, 
the man delivers a short monologue and 
sings a novelty song. 

She re-enters, and they sing a monkey 
nnmber, followed by a grotesque dance. 
For an encore, the pair give an im- 
pression of two women holding a con- 
versation, H. G. 



BRADY AND MAHONEY 

Theatre — Delancey. 

Style — Dialogue and parodies. 

Time — Eleven minutes. 

Setting — Special drop. 

A well painted drop, representing a 
portion of a waterfront with a subma- 
rine in the foreground, and with its 
gangplank leading up to the dock, serves 
as a background for Brady and Ma- 
honey's act. The pair work in one, sup- 
posedly on the dock. 

One of the team is the captain of the 
submarine, playing the straight role. 
His partner is an ordinary seaman, with 
a Hebraic accent 

At the conclusion of their dialogue, 
they go into song. The straight sings 
each number correctly, after which the 
comedian gives a parody version of the 
number. The parodies are clever, and 
the straight has a good singing voice. 

The act is an excellent one of its 
kind. H. G 



FOX AND HARDEN 

Theatre — Palace, S. I. 
Style — Comedy skit. 
Time — Fifteen minutes. 
Setting — One drop. 

This team put over a very good act 
entitled "Too Happy." 

The theme concerns the actions of a 
couple just married. They run on 'midst 
a volley of rice and then inform the 
audience that they are just married 
and are "Oh, So Happy," whereupon 
they caress each other very affection- 
ately. 

The chatter that takes place during the 
remainder of the act dwells on the squab- 
bles of a newly married pair over hotels, 
bills and a thousand other things that 
go with a honeymoon trip. 

H. S. P. 



GRAND OPERA QUAR- 
TETTE 

Theatre — Royal 

Style — Operatio tinging. •'.J. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting— FuU Stage. 

The quartette consists of Nadine 
Lagoti, coloratura soprano ; Mme. Cle- 
ments, mezzo soprano; Andre Arenson, 
tenor, and J. Interrante, baritone. 

Four selections are sung, vis: Vocal 
duet from "La Forsa de Destino (tenor 
and baritone) ; a Russian song, entitled, 
"The Nightingale" (soprano solo.) ; a 
Spanish serenade (tenor solo) : and. 
finally, the Quartette from "Rigoletto." 

The pair possess good voices for this 
line of work, and show up particularly 
well in the final nnmber, which is the 
only selection where the whole four are 
employed. There should be a rearrange- 
ment of the act, so that the turn would 
start with a quartette number as well 
as end with one. Also, the selections 
are, on the whole, unfamiliar, and it 
might be well to put in another nnmber 
that the audience is likely to recognize 
as an old favorite. 

The quartette might also do well to 
give more consideration to their stage 
presence, which they lack at present to 
a marked degree. 

The act should be a splendid one of its 
kind, if these suggestions are followed. 

H. G. 



LIONEL ATWILL & CO. 

Theatre— Colonial 
Style— Playlet. 
Setting — Special. 
Time — Twelve minutes. 

The name of this playlet is "The Kiss 
Market" 

ItH plot deals with a husband's disin- 
clination to pay his wife as much for 
her kisses as be used to. She wants to 
know how to make the price of kisses 
rise again, and learns that the way to in- 
crease the price on a commodity is to 
create a demand for it 

She thereupon makes her husband's 
friend, Lionel Atwill, bolster up the price 
of kisses by charging him a thousand dol- 
lars each. He borrows that amount 
from the husband to pay for the first 
one. It tastes so good he decides he 
wants more, and borrows four thousand 
dollars more from the husband. He 
then delivers the money to the wife. 
Bnt she refuses to deliver the kisses. So, 
to turn the tables, he tells the husband 
that he has decided not to use the five 
thousand dollars he borrowed, and has 
turned it over to the wife to be re- 
turned. In this way, be has obtained his 
one kiss free, and the wife has failed to 
create a demand for ber product. 

The idea is clever, but it is question- 
able bow fitted the offering is for vaude- 
ville. It is entirely too "talky," and, 
although well acted, tends toward monot- 
ony. H. G. 



KELLY & GALVIN 

Theatre — Colonial 
Style— Comedy dialogue. 
Time — Thirteen minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Phil Kelly and Joe Galvin, represent- 
ing an actor and an Italian, have a 
sure fire dialogue and can be depended 
upon as laugh getters. The Italian 
furnishes the comedy and is several 
beads smaller than the actor, so that 
the pair furnish a grotesque combina- 
tion. 

After a lot of talk, the Italian gives 
bis impression of several popular songs. 
This one bit is reminiscent of some of 
Clark and Verdi's business. 

The pair finish with a song duet 
about a sweet tooth, which brings the 
act to a snappy close. 

The act is strong on comedy. 

H. G. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



LONDON 



PARIS 




BERLIN 



SYDNEY 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



London, Eng., May 26. 
Wal and Rose go to Aberdeen next week. 



The Reynolds return to London Jane 11. 



Musical Lento returns to town next 
week. 



Lona Yale plays tbe King's, 'lundee, 
next week. 



Florrie Gallimore plays the Palace, At- 
tercliffe, next week. 



Harry Day has been gazetted Major in 
the Territorial forces. 



Tbe Four Clovelly Girls bave two more 
weeks at the Olympia, Paris. 

Loupe and Ladies open next Monday 
at the Hippodrome, Aldershot 

Harry Ray plays the Hippodrome, Mid- 
dlesbrough, week after next. 



Sam Barton opens next Monday a two- 
weeks' engagement at tbe Palladium. 



George Miller, with his Fred Emney 
sketches, is at the Empire, Kilburn, next 
week. 



George Graves is booked to show "The 
Side of Mr. Bacon" next week at the 
Coliseum. 



Gordon Ash has joined tbe Army and his 
place in the company at the New Theatre 
has been taken by G. H. Mulcaster. 



Lawrence Irving has revived "The Bells" 
and "A Story of Waterloo." Meanwhile, 
H. A. Vachell's new play is rehearsing. 

The Magic Crucible goes to tbe St. 
James, Whitehaven, next week, and plays 
the Empire, Maryport, tbe week following. 



Sidney Dooley, author and producer of 
"Don't Crush," now controls that revue 1 , 
and will send it on the road under his 
own management. 



The Sisters Maccarte, the Waltons, Kit- 
chen and Roy, Ford and Urma and the 
Yamagata Troupe are on the bill at the 
Olympia, Paris. 

The prize offered by the School for 
Dramatists has been awarded to John 
Peterson, whose play, "Light" has been 
adjudged the best. 



Roy Royston leaves the cast of "Vanity 
Fair" this week in order to join the army. 
He has reached the age of eighteen and 
is to be attached to the Royal Flying 
Corps. 



Fred Duprez has been playing this week 
at the Alhambra, Bradford, in a new com- 
edy sketch entitled "Am I Tour Wife." 
Duprez has been starring in "Mr. Man- 
hattan" and last Monday marked his re- 
turn to the halls. 



The cast of "Inside the lines" includes 
Eille Norwood. E. Dagnall. A. G. Poulton, 
Franc Stoney, Lenin Mannering, Philip 
Knox. Frederick Ross, Ida Adams, Sinna 
St Claire, Beatrice Hunt, Duicie Benson 
and Grace Lane. 



Joe Petennan's production, "The Lads of 
the Village,*' will have its showing next 
Monday night at the Oxford. It is a 
patriotic musical play in ten scenes, one 
of which shows a battle, in which fifty dis- 
charged soldiers will appear. The produc- 
tion is to run for eight weeks. 



Marie Ault has returned from South 
Africa. 



Albert Chevalier is on tour playing Eccles 
in "Caste." 



Antony Holies is playing Dick Gilder in 
'Within the Law" on tour. 



Tom Costello, the popular singer, is back 
in town for the remainder of the year. 



Irve Hayman, who has been resting by 
orders of his physician, is recovering bis 
health. 



Frederick Whelen terminates his three 
years' tenancy of the Queen's Theatre in 
September. 



Mme. Ina Hill, tbe prima donna, having 
returned to the halls, is playing the Syn- 
dicate Tour. 



"For Sweethearts and Wives," a new 
naval play, is about to go on tour. Later 
it will come to town. 



Ida Barr has recovered from the effects 
of her recent accident, in which she sus- 
tained a dislocated ankle. 



Tom Drew has scored such a success In 
"Hanky Panky" that Manager Rolls baa 
decided to retain him in it till the end 
of the run. 



Seymour Hicks will resume at the 
Prince's Theatre in September when he will 
present "The Freedom of the Seas," Walter 
Hackett's new play. 



Although Seymour Hicks is on tour with 
"The Catch of the Season," he continues 
tbe Sunday concerts for wounded soldiers 
at the Prince's Theatre. 



Grossmith & Laurillard have renamed 
their new Gaiety offering "The Telephone 
Call." But this will not be presented until 
"Theodore & Co." has worn Its welcome 
oat. 



"High Jinks" is still going strong at 
the Adelpui, although it has passed its 
300th performance. Meanwhile, Alfred 
Butt is preparing a musical version of 
"The Magistrate" to take its place when a 
change is necessary. 



Buster Brown, by defeating Almy Malzy 
in the finals, won the War Loan snooker 
handicap and was awarded the prize, con- 
sisting of War Loan stock to tbe value of 
£60. Arrangements are being made for 
another big handicap. 



Violet Loraine, Joseph Coyne and Nel- 
son Keys have been engaged by Oswald 
Stoll for his forthcoming production of 
"Around the Map," the American review 
he will present at the Alhambra when the 
public tires of "Tbe Bing Girls." 



The new theatre tax, which goes into 
effect in July, is unpopular with managers, 
on the ground that the Summer is the 
very worst time to put on any such tax. 
A deputation of managers are to ask the 
Chancellor to postpone the levy of the 
increased tax until October. 



The Criterion Theatre has been sold to 
a syndicate, in which the firm of Bnszard's 
is largely interested, and will change hands 
at the end of June. Charles Wyndham 
will continue as lessee and incidentally his 
present attraction, "A Little Bit of Fluff," 
is rounding out its 750th performance. 
After the wax the restaurant connected 
with the theatre will undergo extensive 
alterations and improvements, bat nothing 
will be done to the theatre itself. 



Katie Hughes is now on the L. T. V. 
tour. ' 



"Alias Jimmy Valentine" is doing well 
in the provinces. 



The wounded Tommies are exempt from 
the theatre ticket tax. 



Harry Sharp, of Sharp's Tromboneers, 
has gone to the Front. 



"Uncle Tom's Cabin" continues to en- 
tertain provincial audiences. 



Jack Fiske, late of Fiske and Fiske, is 
now "somewhere in France." 



Neil Kenyon's new character sketch will 
be called "A Glasgow Cameo." 



A Bpecial matinee of "Romance" will 
be given at tbe Lyric on June 5. 



"Bits" is the title of Harry Grattan's 
forthcoming review, on which he is actively 
working. 



The management of tbe Kingsway The- 
atre has appointed a woman as stage 
doorkeeper. 



Fred Barnes is slowly recovering from 
his nervous breakdown but will be unable 
to resume work. 



Love Conn, the female impersonator, 
opens June 11 at tbe Coliseum for a tour 
of the Stoll balls. 



The D"Oyley Carte Opera Co. began its 
annual season at the King's Theatre, Ham- 
mersmith, last Monday. 



"Stolen Fruit" is the title of the new 
sketch which Syd Walker has written 
for his own use in the halls. 



Cecil Elgar and W. G. Barnard, owners 
of the Palace, Freshwater, have taken over 
tbe Hippodrome, West Wight. 



"When Knights Were Bold" closes its 
tour next week at the Lyceum Theatre, 
Sheffield. It reopens early in July. 



Ernest Gates has arranged with Frank 
Weathersby for a season of stock at the 
Grand, Brighton, opening on June 4, with 
"Her Love Against the World." 



Lindsay Edwards, manager of tbe Em- 
pire, Bradford, has been appointed general 
manager of the Laidler Theatre Circuit, 
with headquarters in Bradford. 



Oswald Stoll will give Sunday picture 
concerts at the Stoll Picture Theatre, for- 
merly the London Opera House, in aid of 
the War Seal Foundation Fund. 



When "Vanity Fair" ceases to draw to 
the Palace it will be replaced by a new 
piece by C. H. Bovill. Gertie Millar and 
John Humphries are to play leading roles. 



The regular repertory season at the 
Theatre Royal Bath, is now in full awing. 
The "company includes Noel Phelps, F. G. 
Knott, Harry Astell, G. H. Kersley, 
George Tawde, Charles Young, Ella Es- 
kine, Grace Rost, Miss L. Fanshawe and 
Maud Dawson. 



Ernest C. Rolls is at work on a new 
version of his Oxford success "Seeing 
Life," which will be renamed "London 
Life." He also has a new revue In hand 
for which he has engaged Jennie Benson 
for a leading role. Max Darewsld will 
write the music for this work. 



VICAR-DRAMATIST DIES 

London, Eng., May 29.— Rev. Forbes 
Alexander Phillips, novelist and dramatist. 
who wrote under the name of Athol Forbes, 
died today at Gorleston Vicarage, Great 
Yarmouth. Among the plays he wrote were 
"Her First Proposal," "Church or Stage." 
"Lord Danby's Affair," "A Maid of 
France," "When It Was Dark," and the 
"Last Toast" 



SYDNEY IS A DOG TOWN 

Sydney, Aus., May 30. — By an arrange- 
ment between Haddon Chambers and 
Cyril Maude Australia is enabled to have 
the first glimpse at Chambers' next play. 
The work which is a comedy will be 
presented by Maude during his forth- 
coming engagement in this city where be 
begins bis Australian tour. 



TO PLAY MATINEE BENEFITS 

London, Eng., May 29. — Following her 
week in "Pygmalion and Galatea" at the 
Olympia, Liverpool, Mary Anderson and 
the star London company will play a series 
of "flying" matinees on the Moss Empire 
Tour. All receipts from these engagements 
are devoted to the various war relief funds. 



COL. NEWHAM DAVIS IS DEAD 

London, Eng., May 29. — Lieut-Col. 
Nathaniel Newborn Davis, author and play- 
wright, died here yesterday. He was co- 
author of "Lady Madcap," and sole author 
of "A Day in Paris," which was presented 
in America under the late Charles Froh- 
man's direction. 



PLAN NEW THEATRE IN DURBAN 

DtraBAN, South Africa, May 27. — A syn- 
dicate was recently formed in this city, for 
the purpose of erecting a four-story the- 
atre and hotel building to cost half a mil- 
lion dollars. The site, the title for which 
was passed yesterday, is near tbe Town 
Hall. 



GET TILLER GIRLS FOR SHOW 

Paris, Fr., May 28.— A French version 
of "A Hundred Years Ago," for which tbe 
J. Tiller girls have been engaged aa a fea- 
ture, is in preparation for one of the 
Barretta-Valterra Halls, and will be aa 
elaborate production in June. 



NEW TAX AFFECTS ATTENDANCE 

London, Eng., May 29. — There has been 
a big slump in theatrical business all over 
the country principally due to the new en- 
tertainment tax which is generally sup- 
posed to be in force, but which does not 
take effect until July. 



NURSES NOT TO PAY TICKET TAX 

London, Eng., May 28. — Bonar Law has 
stated that a provision will be made in 
the new Entertainment Tax Bill exempting 
not only wounded soldiers who go to the- 
atres but the nurses who accompany them 
as well. 



REVISE "THE BELLE" IN PARIS 

Paris, Ft., May 28. — Unless the present 
plans fall through musical shows will be 
the offerings at the Folies Bergere during 
this Summer. "The Belle of New York" 
has been chosen as the opening attraction. 



BERETTA TAKES MORE HOUSES 

Pakis, Ft., May 29. — Raphael Beretta. 
active manager of the Folies Bergere and 
Olympia, has taken over the Ambassa- 
deurs, Champs Elysees and the Alcazar 
d'Ete for the Summer season. 



SYDNEY AWAITING MAUDE 

Sydney, Aus., May 30. — Cyril Maude 
will begin his engagement here under the 
J. O. Williamson direction early next 
month. It is his intention to open in 
"Grumpy." 



MADISON GOES IN VAUDEVILLE 

London,. Eng., May 30. — Nat Madison, 
the American actor, has joined Vera Hicks 
and they are rehearsing a new act in which 
they will soon be seen in the leading halls. 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



ll 




gg fr N EW Y ORK 



Founded in 1SSJ by Frank Queen 

Published by the 

CLIPPER CORPORATION 

Orland W. Vaughan ... President and Secretary 

Frederick C. Mailer.., ....Treasurer 

1604 Broadway. New York 

Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLAND W. VAUGHAN. EDITOR 

Paul C. Sweinhart, Managing Editor 



Answers to Queries 

G. R. A.— We do not know Billy Gould's 
age. 

D. G. H.— "Come Out of the Kitchen" is 
headed for the Coast. 



NEW YORK, JUNE 6, 1917 

Entered June 24, 1879, at the Post Office at 
New York. N. Y.. as second class matter, un- 
der the act of March 3, 1879. 
THE CLIPPER is issued every WEDNESDAY. 
Forms Close on Monday at 5 P. M. 
SUBSCRIPTION 
One Tear, in advance. $4: six months. $2; 
three months, $1. Canada and foreign postage 
extra. Single copies will be sent, postpaid, on 
receipt of 10 cents. 
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION 



B. A, D.— "The Case of Becky" was 
written by Edward Locks, 

J. O— Tommy Ryan and John T. Kelly 
were the original "Bards of Tara." 

N. E. D., Grand Rapids. — It has been 
reported that . Charlie Chaplin is married. 

R. 0. — Wm. Hodge made his stellar 
debut under the management of Liebler 
& Co. 



Chicago Office— Room 210, 45 S. Dearborn St. 
(ins. Colvin, Manages. 



Southwestern Office — 1125 Grand Ave, 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Al. Makinson. Manacex. 



Address All Communications to 

THE NEW YORK CUPPER 

1604 Broadway, New York 

Registered Cable Address, "Autboiity." 



Thx Cunn cam ax obtained wholxsalb and 
xetail, at our agents. Daw's Steamship Agency, 
17 Green Street. Charing Cross Road, London, 
W. C., England; Brentano's News Depot, 37 
Avenue de i'Opera, Paris, France ; Manila Book 
and Stationery Co., 128 Escolta Street. Manila. 
F. I.; Gordon & Gotch, 123 Pitt, Sydney, N. 
S. VV„ Australia. 



T. F. C— Harry Kernell was the older 
of the vaudeville team of John and Harry 
Kernell. 



C. D. E. — Lee Kugel was press represen- 
tative of the late Henry B. Harris for a 
number of years. 



Films Escape War Taxation 

At the eleventh hour, motion pictures, 
the poor man's entertainment, has re- 
ceived consideration at the hands of the 
United States Senate, by the removal of 
the tax from all tickets of admission to 
film houses costing twenty-five cents and 
less. The House bill called for a tax of 
one cent for each ten cents paid for a 
ticket, and its removal will inure to the 
benefit of the greatest number of patrons 
of any form of amusement in the world. 

The motion for the change was made 
by Senator Penrose on the ground that 
"motion pictures constitute the poor 
man's theatre," coupled with the sugges- 
tion that such entertainments possess real 
educational value for the maBsea. 

It would be difficult to oven approxi- 
mate the harm that would have been 
done by the keeping on of this tax— harm 
to the small exhibitor and the public 
alike. Motion pictures, which are shown 
at cheap prices, form the sole source of 
amusement of millions of persons in the 
United States, the majority of whom are 
to be found in the larger cities,. Before 
the movie came this great class of people 
were denied the recreation derived from 
shows of any kind, because of the cost. 
The poorer families are, it is well known, 
usually large and the small incomes pro- 
hibited the expenditure of quarters or 
half dollars for anything but the bare 
necessities of life. Life to them, there- 
fore, meant one continual grind. 

With the arrival of the cheap motion 
picture theatre came a form of recreation 
and entertainment never before dreamed 
of by these people. A father could enter- 
tain his family of four or five on 25 cents 
or, at most, 60 cents, and while it might 
require a little pinching' and scrimping on 
the part of the parents to indulge in 
such "extravagance," it could be done 
and motion pictures have brought many 
a ray of sunshine to the homes of these 
people. 

If the tax proposed by the Lower House 
had been retained much of this sunshine 
would have been barred from them— for 
the reason that the small exhibitor, who 
has all he can do to make ends meet, 
would have been compelled to make bis 
patrons pay the tax. The patrons, or 
many of them, could not afford to pay 
the tax and would either stay away from 
the pictures entirely or cut their theatre- 
going- in half. 



F. I. J. — James Forbes was the author 
of "The Chorus Lady." He also wrote 
"The Commuters." 

K. P. — Joseph Jefferson was with the 
all-star cast of "The Rivals" company 
which toured the country. 

E. R. W. — Alfred Swenson was the lead- 
ing man of the stock company which re- 
cently closed at New Bedford. 

S. G., Wilmington.— "The Pawn" ia 
Frank Keenan's first legitimate play 
since he left motion pictures. 

F. F. C— May Vokes played her first 
"Slavey" role at the old Madison Square 
Theatre on Twenty-fourth Street. 

G. S. — "In for the Night" was produced 
at the Fulton Theatre. It was a failure 
and played a short engagement only. 



R1NGUNG BOYS ALL REGISTERED 

Editor. New York Cupper: 

Dear Sir. — In your issue of May 30, 
your Boston correspondent predicted that 
those of military age with Ringling Bros, 
shows would register in Boston, registra- 
tion day. Allow me to state as a self-ap- 
pointed committee of one, that as far as 
this show is concerned there will be very 
little registering in Boston on that date. 

As has been extensively explained, those 
who must register must get their certifi- 
cates to their home address or voting pre- 
cinct or in the hands of the proper au- 
thority, by June 5. To accomplish this 
end, the boys of the ages called and se- 
cured their cards as soon as they were 
available, and established a record in Jer- 
sey City, Newark and Camden for apply- 
ing early, filling them out and getting 
them to their proper destination. If there 
is any registering in Boston on June 5, 
when the show is there, it will be done 
by those who are unable heretofore to get 
cards, or have hesitated from not knowing 
the requirements of the law. As there has 
been a Bpecial tent for this work with the 
show every day, added by city officials in 
each town visited, Boston authorities need 
not be surprised if no one applies. We've 
already been there! 

R. M. Wilson, 
Care Ringling Bros. 



J. L. B. — Margaret Mayo was a co- 
author of "Twin Beds," and is the wife 
of Edgar Selwyn, who produced the play. 

G. G. F. — Joseph Herbert, Jr., now ap- 
pearing in vaudeville, is the eon of Joseph 
Herbert, the well-known actor and libret- 
tist. 

W. B.— The Writers' Monthly Magazine 
is published by The Home Correspondence 
School, Myrick Building, Springfield, 
Mass. 



E. I. R.— "Turn to the Right" was given 
its first New York City production Au- 
gust 17, 1010, at the Gaiety Theatre, 
where it has held forth ever since. 



J. F.— Yes, the City Theatre, on Four- 
teenth Street, was to have been demol- 
ished, but for the information you seek 
you will have to ask the management. 

N. R. — There is no team doing a simi- 
lar act to that done by Harry and Johnny 
Kernell, and it would be difficult to pick 
out two performers of today that would 
"fit in their shoes." 



Zerg Ham Not Resigned 

Editor, New York Clipper: 

Dear Sir — At various times there has 
been a report to the effect that I have 
resigned from the firm of Hurtig and 
Seamon. 

The fact that a man receives a testi- 
monial in commemoration of his twenty 
years service with a firm, should be no 
more indication for a severance of con- 
nections than the crystal wedding of a 
couple being the motif for a separation. 
I will be with the firm of Hurtig and Sea- 
mon until that concern grows tired of my 
services. It seems that neither party has 
displayed any desire to change matters 
and, while it is true that I had various 
offers from other firms, it is just as true, 
that I have not accepted any. It is my 
sincere intention to stay in Dayton in my 
present vocation and I would thank you 
most profoundly for bringing this fact to 
the attention of your readers. 

Most respectfully yours, 
Leon Zero. 
Dayton, Ohio, June 2, 1017. 



RIALTO RATTLES | 



N. D. — Crystal Heme is the daughter 
of the late James A. Heme. She made 
her stage debut as little Crystal in her 
father's production of "Hearts of Oak." 
Her mother was professionally known as 
Catherine Cocoran. 



Sister Seeks Baba Del Babs 

Editor, New York Cupper: 

Dear Sir — We are trying to locate a girl 
by the name of Jessie Pierce, who left this 
city in 1013, going to New York to enter 
the theatrical profession under the name 
of "Baba Del Babs." Nothing has been 
beard of ber since that time. Effort has 
been made through the New York Police 
Department to locate ber, but without 
success. 

The Police Commissioner of that city 
bas suggested that we write your paper 
requesting that notice of the missing girl 
be published. Her sister lives here and is 
trying to locate her in connection with the 
settlement of an estate in Montana. 

If anyone knows her please communi- 
cate with me. 

W. J. Weih. 
Chief of Police. 

Spokane, Wash., May 30, 1017. 



HE WAS A HARD AUDIENCE 

Owen Johnson was sued for divorce by 
Mme. Cobina, the opera singer, because 
he would not stay at home, she Maiming 
that there was too much noise in the 
bouse. Evidently, when she practiced the 
scaleB, he didn't appreciate that be was 
being given a free performance of what 
other persons paid good money to hear. 

SURE EMPLOYMENT 

H. J. Van Vliet, ot the Chamberlain 
Brown office, says that he in referring 
all those who claim they mutt have im- 
mediate work to McKenny at 225 IV* « 
Forty-second Street. Those who have fol- 
lowed Van's hint have found that Mc- 
Kenny !b a lieutenant at the Naval Re- 
cruiting Station. 

LIBERTY LIGHTS 47TH ST. 

Frank Tinney wanted to know what 
the Statue of Liberty was doing in the 
lobby of the Palace Theatre, and some- 
one is said to have told him that Julia 
Arthur had it moved up there from New 
York harbor so that it would be safe 
from submarines and Teuton plotters. 

MUSICALLY SPEAKING 

When the Musical Walkers were robbed, 
someone must have given the robbers the 
right key. But Walker says that If he had 
caught the man he would have tried to 
pitch him out. However, as matters stand, 
Walker should be able to quickly retrieve 
bis losses by making more notes. 

HEARD ON THE RIALTO 

"I'm going to spend the summer at 
Freeport." 

"My agent says he's pulling his hard- 
est for me." 

"I close my act with a war song that 
makes 'em hold on to their seats." 

FOR THE FIRST LINE TRENCHES: 

Marimba artiBts who play "William 
Tell" or "Poet and Peasant." 

Acrobats who take themselves so seri- 
ously. 

Performers who tell you, "We're stop- 
ping the show I" 

PACIFISTS ENCOURAGED 

Pacifist! will be glad to hear that 
George M Cohan and Willie Collier did a 
brother act recently at the Hippodrome. 
Now that that ia settled, world peace 
should be a comparatively easy matter. 

A LARGE COMMUNITY 

At the N. V. A. benefit Eddie Foy and 
his Seven Little Foys were introduced by 
Loney Haskell as "Half of New Rochelle." 
Later, Stella Mayhew was introduced as 
"the other half pf New Rochelle." 

SOME EMBRACE! 

Inga Orner must be of a very lovable 
disposition, for we learn from the papers 
that she embraced over two hundred con- 
certs on her recent world tour. 



T. A. G.— The late Theodore Moss was 
connected with Lester Wallack'a business 
staff for years. After Wallack's death 
Moss represented the estate and later be- 
came lessee of Wallack's Theatre, at 
Broadway and Thirteenth Street. 



DON'T MISS THE CLIPPER 

During Vacation 

THREE MONTHS FOR ONE DOLLAR 

Sent to Your Summer Address. 
Remit to CLIPPER CORPORATION, 1604 Broadway, N. Y. 



CORRECT REASONING 

It is reported that Maude Fealy's one- 
act play, "The Reason," doesn't seem to 
have the necessary punch, so there is no 
reason for "The Reason." 



ACTOR, FINED, SLAPS COP 

Algernon Whipple, who said be was a 
burlesque actor, was haled before Magis- 
trate House of the Traffic Court on a 
charge of violating the speed laws and 
driving his automobile while intoxicated 
last week and was fined $100. After pay- 
ing the fine and as be walked out of the 
courtroom, he slapped the officer who bad 
arrested him and was re-arrested and fined 
$10 more. _ 



HE'LL KNOW WHEREOF HE WRITES 
Somerset Maugham, who was married 
last week, should now be able to put 
more atmosphere into his new play, 
"Love in a Cottage." 

SHE CAN STILL SING IT 

It's too bad Nellie Nichols did not have 
to register yesterday, bo that she could 
settle for herself the question of nam- 
ing her nationality. 



HE WAS SURPRISED 

When Howard Johnson saw the parade 
on Decoration Day he exclaimed, "Gee! I 
didn't know we were sending any troops 
to Europe yet!" 

WE'LL TAKE HIS PLACE 

What do you think about Carter De 
Haven's decision to desert seven little 
and pretty widows? 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 




<sim 




A. H. WOODS TO HAVE MANY 

PRODUCTIONS NEXT SEASON 



Players Already Rehearsing for Plays Which Will Be Given 

Spring Try outs, and in Some Cases Summer Runs; "Mary's 

Ankle" First to Be Submitted for Public Test 



With more than a half-dozen plays 
either completely or partially cast, with 
more than that number contracted for 
production by October 1, 1917, with sev- 
eral playwrights busy on others, and with 
a host of prominent players already en- 
listed under his standard, A. H. Woods is 
preparing to make the season of 1017-18 
one of the most active seasons of his 
career. 

The first of his new productions is 
"Mary's Ankle," a farce-comedy by May 
Tully, whose initial performance was 

g'ven at the Shubert Theatre, New 
aven, on May 28, to be followed by a 
short engagement in Atlantic City, and a 
run at the Wilbur Theatre, Boston, where 
it will succeed the Dolly Sisters in "His 
Bridal Night," The cast includes Irene 
Fenwick, Walter Jones, Zelda Sears, 
Louise Drew, Bert Lytell, Leo Donnelly, 
Ida Darling and T. W. Gibson. 

Immediately after the production of 
"Mary's Ankle" Woods put into rehearsal 
a new three-act drama by Samuel Ship- 
man, entitled "The Target." Engaged for 
the principal roles are: Emmett Corrigan, 
Clara Joel, Harry C. Browne, Harry Me- 
stayer, James Spottswood, Maidel Turner 
and" Suzanne Willa. The play will be 
presented in Atlantic City, on July 9, and 
brought to New York about the middle 
of August. 

Conspicuous among Mr. Woods' con- 
templated productions for the coming 
season is a new "Potash and Perlmutter" 
play by Montague Glass and Jules Eckert 
Goodman. It is tentatively called "Pot- 
ash and Perlmutter Film Company," and 
its production will mark the return of 
Barney Bernard and Alexander Carr to 
joint stardom in their original roles. In 
the present play the authors transfer 
"Abe" and "Mawruss" from the atmos- 
phere of the cloak and suit trade to the 
movies. 

This manager has also engaged Robert 
Hilliard to star in "The Scrap of Paper," 
a dramatization by Owen Davis of Arthur 
Somers Roche's popular story in the 
Saturday Evening Post. Clara Joel will 
be leading woman with Mr. Hilliard. 
After creating the principal role in Mr. 
Shipman's play in Atlantic City. Miss 
Joel will commence rehearsals with Hil- 
liard in "The Scrap of Paper." Edward 



Ellis will also be in the cast of this play. 

The Dolly Sisters, whose season in "His 
Bridal Night" came to a close in Boston 
on May 26, will be presented in a new 
musical play by Guy Bolton and G. P. 
Wodehouse, with music by Jean Schwartz. 
Other musical plays scheduled for produc- 
tion under Woods' direction are "Call a 
Taxi," by Earl Carrol], to be presented 
with an all-star cast. "The Girl From 
the Trenches," an adaptation from the 
French by Paul Potter, and a musical 
version of "The Girl From Ciro's," Mr. 
Woods' London success, which will furnish 
a vehicle for Mabel McCane. 

Marjorie Rambeau will be presented in 
a new play. 

Woods has also taken under his man- 
agement Robert Warwick, who will be 
presented in a new play next fall. 

Max Marcin is writing a new play for 
Mr. Woods, described as a farce mystery 
melodrama. 

Other plays that will be produced by 
October 1 of this year are "Jim's Woman," 
by Wayne Bryan Carlock; "It Is the 
Law," by Arthur J. Westermayer and Col- 
Jasper Ewing Brady; "In the Net," by 
Ramsay Morris; "Fingerprints," by Min- 
nie Scheff ; "The Gay Lothario," by C. W. 
Bell and Mark Swan; "The Small Town 
Girl," by Eugene Walter and Cronin Wil- 
son; "His Honor the Judge," by Nancy 
and Jean Rioux, and "Playing the Game," 
by Ashton Stevens and Charles Michelson. 

Early in November Mr. Woods will 
have ready for occupancy his new the- 
atre in Chicago. This theatre, one of 
the finest and most modern in the coun- 
try, will be dedicated with the produc- 
tion of "Cheating Cheaters." Before 
opening in the new playhouse in Chicago, 
"Cheating Cheaters will have a short 
preliminary tour beginning at the Bronx 
Opera House September 13. 

"Potash and Perlmutter in Society" 
will make the first trip to the Coast, 
opening in Grand Rapids on September 1. 

In addition to his stage activities, Mr. 
Woods will project on the screen his 
great repertoire of stage successes. The 
A. H. Woods Picture Corporation, re- 
cently organized for that purpose, will 
constitute not the least of Mr. Woods' 
many future enterprises. Altogether he 
plans a very busy season. 



MISS ANCJJN HAS 3 PLAYS 

Margaret Anglin has acquired the rights 
to three new plays, all of which will be 
produced out of town in September and 
may find their way to New York in late 
October. They are : "Getters and Givers," 
a play by Hnlbert Footner: a dramatiza- 
tion of Emerson Hough's new novel, "The 
Broken Gate," and a comedy called "The 
Pot o' Shamrock." The Greek Classics, in 
conjunction with Walter Damrosch and the 
New York Symphony Orchestra, will be 
offered in January. 

WILLIAMS HAS THOMAS PLAY 

"The Copperhead" is the title of a new 
play by Augustus Thomas, which will 
be produced early next month at the Alca- 
zar. San Francisco, under the personal 
supervision of the author. Mr. Thomas 
left for the West last Thursday and Mr. 
Williams will follow in a week or two. 
"The Copperhead" is the first of several 
productions which Williams and Thomas 
will make jointly. 



RITER HAS NEW PLAY 

Jos. Riter last week assembled a com- 
pany to rehearse William Hurlbut*s new 
comedy, "Romance and Arabella," which 
is to have its initial production the latter 
part of this month. In the_ cast are Laura 
Hope Crews, Lizzie Hudson Collier, Alice 
Augarde Butler, Jennie La Mont, Virginia 
Chauvenet, Henry Stanford, Donald Gal- 
lahar, Harry Ashford, Frank Connor, Al- 
fred Hunt, Harold Christie, Henry War- 
wick and Harry Blaising. The piece will 
be staged by George Foster Piatt. 



COHAN DRAMATIZING STORY 

Gillett Burgess' story. "Mrs. Hope's Hus- 
band." is to be dramatized by George M. 
Cohan, and will be offered in the Fall by 
Cohan & Harris. 



MARGUERTTA SYLVA RETURNING 

Margnerita Sylva, the operatic star, is 
on her way to America from Paris, to 
appear in opera, concert and motion pic- 
tures. 



"UNBORN" DELETED FROM TITLE 

In view of the fact that George Bell, 
License Commissioner, objected to the pre- 
sentation of Howard McKent Barnes' 
motherhood play under the title of "Her 
Unborn Child," the word "Unborn" was 
deleted from the printing and program 
when Richard Buhler and his associate 
players presented the play at the Irving 
Place Theatre last week. 



"THE ASSASSIN" OPENS 

New Haven, June 1. — Eugene Walter 
presented his four act melodrama, "The 
Assassin," here last night for its initial per- 
formance. Among those in the cast are 
George Probert, Fania Marinoff and Ralph 
Kellard. The play is to be produced in 
New York in the Fall. 



AMES PIECE WITHDRAWN 

"Saturday to Monday," produced last 
week at the Belasco Theatre, Washington, 
D. C, by Winthrop Ames, was withdrawn 
after Saturday nighfs performance and 
will be held by Mr. Ames for a New York 
showing early next Fall 



TO GIVE "CALIBAN" AT HARVARD 

Cambridge, Mass., June L — "Caliban," 
Percy Mackaye's Shakespearean Masque, 
will be presented in the Harvard Sta- 
dium beginning on June 28. Gareth 
Hughes and Alexander Carlisle will have 
their original roles. 



"GETTING MARRIED" TO CLOSE 

William Faversham's producUon of "Get- 
ting Married," will conclude its season at 
the Standard Theatre on Saturday night. 
In the cast of principals besides Faversham 
are Hilda Spong, Henrietta Crossman and 
Charles Cherry. 



WILL PRODUCE BrUEUX PLAY 

Myriam Deroxe, an American graduate of 
the Conservatoire of Paris, Fr., who ar- 
rived in this city from abroad last week, 
has been commissioned to produce a Eu- 
gene Brieux play for the first time in 
English. 



CENTURY SHOW TO HAVE PLOT 

Contrary to the show of this season, 
which was typical of a big vaudeville pro- 
duction more than anything else, the attrac- 
tion at the Century next year will have a 
plot, suggested by Lew Fields. 



DORZIAT TO PRODUCE IN PARIS 

GabreUe Dorziat, the French actress, 
sails June 9 for Paris where she will pro- 
duce "The Thirteenth Chair." She in- 
tends to return to this country in August. 



"BEAUTIFUL UNKNOWN" DATE SET 

"The Beautiful Unknown," the New 
York appearance of which has been de- 
layed from time to time, will go into the 
Forty-Fourth Street Theatre on June 18. 



FUND AUTOS ARE AWARDED 

The awards for the two automobiles for 
which shares were sold at the Actors' Fund 
Fair, were made to Miss N. Trodden, of 
16 West Fifty-fifth Street, and Franklin 
Paine, of Chicago, last week. 



SHUBERTS HAVE NEW PIECE 

"Proving An Alibi," a comedy by Mrs. 
Anne Crawford Flexner will have its ini- 
tial stage prodaction under the direction 
of the Shuberts in Albany June 18. 



"OUR BETTERS" CLOSING 

"Our Betters," W. Somerset Maugham's 
comedy at the Hudson Theatre, will com- 
plete its season there Saturday. The piece 
will reopen in the Fall. 



STRINDBERG PLAY 
IN NEW BILL 

AT THE COMEDY 

The Washington Square Players hav- 
ing completed their regular subscription 
season have revived for a limited en- 
gagement two of their comedy successes. 
"Another Way Out" and "Plots and Play- 
wrights." In addition to these they pre- 
sented "Pariah," a new play by August 
Strindberg, translated from the Swedish 
by Edith and Warner Oland. 

"Pariah" is a grim one-act play dealing 
with the crimes of forgery and murder. 
The action takes place in a farmhouse in 
Sweden, in which is living Mr. X., an 
archaeologist, and Mr. Y., an American 
traveler, a stranger who, tramping 
through the country, has been invited to 
share the house for a time. 

As the curtain rises a thunder storm is 
brewing in the distance and Mr. Y. is 
visibly nervous and distraught, which in- 
creases as the storm approaches. Notic- 
ing that his guest is ill at ease, Mr. X. 
attempts to distract his attention from 
the storm by commencing a discussion re- 
garding the pasts of both and turning it 
about into an adroit series of questions 
draws from the traveler the fact that he 
has served a term in prison for forgery, 
and then casually confesses that he is 
also a law-breaker, having in the past 
committed a murder. 

The archaeologist years before in an 
argument with a drunken cab driver 
struck him a blow which resulted fatally. 
He did not confess to the police, and 
reconciles himself to the belief that as 
the killing was accidental he is no 
criminal. 

This act of concealment the traveler 
seizes upon as an opportunity to secure 
funds with which he can be pardoned for 
his offense and bis standing re-estab- 
lished, and he thereupon demands of the 
archaeologist as the price of his silence 
a share of the jewels the latter has re- 
cently found in his excavations. 

Bat the archaeologist, by clever ques- 
tioning, forces from the traveler the fact 
that his explanation of his crime was 
stolen from one of the archaeologist's own 
books, and that be is therefore only a 
common thief— a criminal lacking either 
intelligence or imagination. 

The archaeologist, although a homicide, 
drives the former from the house with 
loathing. 

Arthur E. Hohl gave a good perform- 
ance of the archaeologist and Ralph L. 
Boeder exhibited considerable force in the 
character of the forger. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 
Tribune* — Tells cumulatively dramatic 

story. 
Herald — Holds audience in suspense. 
World — Draws characters in vivid contrast. 
Times — Morbidly interesting psychological 

' study. 
Sun — Murder is seen in new light. 

CLEVELAND PLANS NEW HOUSE 

Cixvetand, O., June 2. — According to 
the terms of a lease given the Fourth 
Street Realty Company by the Sheriff 
Street, Land & Improvement Company, 
last week, for a term of ninety-nine years, 
beginning May 31, 1920, a new opera hou.°e 
will be constructed in this city oij the site 
of the present one. A clause in the lea-? 
calls for the erection of a new building, at 
a cost of $100,000. The present lease is 
held by A. F. Hartze, the local represeni.i- 
tive of Klaw & Erlanger. 



McKAY SECURES "CRAVEN" 

Frederick McKay has accepted a com- 
edy entitled "Craven," written by Mabel 
Ferris and Laura L. Hinkley, and will 
present it early next season in this city. 
He has arranged with James Thatcher, of 
the Poli stock theatres, for its production 
for a week at the Columbia, Washington. 
next month, as a try-out 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




WAR SCARE 

CAUSES 7 

CLOSINGS 

STOCKS SERIOUSLY AFFECTED 



The height of the Summer stock season 
is witnessing a condition tbat does not 
speak well for the financial prospects of 
stock in general. This is the lack of com- 
panies opening and, more especially, of 
companies closing, which, at this time, 
seems unwarranted. 

The fact that only stock-tried-and-made- 
good towns are being ventured into and 
doubtful ones are being shunned shows that 
managers are very cautious, and many are 
closing their companies now before they 
become a losing proposition. 

In an interview with one manager, he 
claimed that the reason for this situation 
was tbe psychology created by war alarm- 
ists. The past season was a very good 
one for stock, he said, which was because 
people were told they were prosperous. 
Now, the hysterical appeal for economy 
that is sweeping the country is having its 
effect on the theatres, and is especially re- 
flected in the business of stock houses. 

On Saturday, June 2, seven large stock 
companies closed their engagements and 
most of their members are reported "rest- 
ing for the Summer." 

The Hyperion Musical Players at the 
Hyperion Theatre, New Haven. Conn. : 
the Poli Stock Co. at the Academy of 
Music, Scranton, Pa. ; the Winifred St. 
Claire Co., headed by Nola Mercer and 
Robert Gleckler, at the St. Claire Play- 
bouse, Paterson, N. J. ; tbe Marguerite 
Fields Stock Co. at the Palace Theatre, 
White Plains; the Knickerbocker Players 
at the Knickerbocker Theatre, Philadel- 
phia ; the All-Star Stock Co. at the New 
Bedford Theatre, New Bedford, Mass., and 
tbe Empire Players, Salem, Mass., are 
among those which closed Saturday. 



BLAINE'S PLAYERS OPEN SEASON 

Saskatoon, Can., June 2. — James 
Blaine's Permanent Players opened their 
Summer engagement at the Empire Theatre 
last week with "Seven Keys to Baldplate.'* 
Playing opposite Mr. Blaine is Miss Doro- 
thy Mitchell and in tbe company are: Jack 
Milton, Rita Elliott. George Secord, Etta 
Delmas, Joe Lawlis, Val Howland, J. P. 
Anderson, Chas. F. Smith, George Perkins, 
Wm. Winterton and Al. New. The bills 
.will change weekly. This week "Common 
Clay" is the atlraction, with "A Pair of 
Sixes." "Under Cover" to follow. 



ROBINS CO. STAGES NEW PLAY 

Toronto, Can., June 2. — Edward H. 
Robins and his stock company are present- 
ing a new play this week for the first time 
on any stage at the Royal Alexandra Thea- 
tre. The play is by Charles Kenyon and 
Frank Bare and is entitled "The Claim." 
Florence Roberts and Mr. Robins appear in 
the leading roles. It will be produced in 
New York early in October under the man- 
agement of Mrs. Henry B. Harris. 



SUMNER GOES TO FRISCO 

Sax Francisco. June 2. — John Sumner, 
who made a big hit in Oakland, In the role 
of Long John Silver in "Treasure Island," 
at Bishop Playhouse, has been engaged to 
play the same role in the forthcoming pre- 
sentation of the Robert Louis Stevenson 
story at the Wigwam Theatre, here. 



CUTTER CO. PLAYS GRANVILLE 

Granville, N. Y., June 2. — The Cutter 
Stock Co. appeared at the Pember Thea- 
tre all last week. The company is headed 
by Sadie Belgrade and J. Bernard Hurl, 
and in their support are Ruth Leighten. 
Richard Foote and Herbert H. Power. 



PALMER COLE CO. IN 6TH WEEK 

Asthosy, Kan., May 31. — The Palmer 
Cole Players, under the management of 
Harry Kieffer are now in their sixth week. 
Featured with the company are Goldie 
Cole, playing leading soubrette roles. Al. 
J. Palmer, comedian, and Don Palmer, 
leading man. 

Tbe roster of the company includes: 
Carl Berch, Harry Lloyd, Leo Waddle, E. 
T. Echlin, Mamie Sheridan Wolford, Louise 
Browning, Jack Boyer, R. A. Miller, U. G. 
Nixon, Richard Uhara, Mattie Mathews, 
M. Steinline, George Keiffer, Andy Ander- 
son, and Master Georgie Kieffer. 



LITTLE FERN CO. OPENS 

Tipton, Kan., June 2. — The John G. 
and Little Fern Stock Co. opened the 
Summer season Monday under its canvas 
theatre. After a Winter season in opera 
bouses in Kansas and Oklahoma, the com- 
pany laid off two weeks. All the old com- 
pany with one exception have signed for 
the Summer season and the company has 
been enlarged by additions to the orchestra. 
John G. has secured new bills for the re- 
turn dates, written especially for himself 
and Little Fern, by Mart Zeilie. 



TOM MARKS CLOSING SEASON 

Tom Marks, presenting "For His Coun- 
try," closes a season of forty-two weeks 
June 9, and will open again in his new 
play "His Son-in-Law" Labor Day. The 
members of the company are all re- 
engaged for next season, and will spend 
the summer at Christie. Lake Ontario, 
the home of the Marks brothers. 



TEST REJOINS WHITNEY CO. 

Ithaca, Mich., June 2. — Rnssel L. Test 
has closed a season of forty-two weeks with 
the Gladys Klark Co. in Bangor, Me., and 
has re-joined the Lou Whitney Co., playing 
leads opposite Miss Whitney. Mr. Test 
was Miss Whitney's leading man for four 
years before joining Miss Klark. 



HYPERION MUSICAL CO. CLOSES 

New Haven, Conn., June 2. — The Hy- 
perion Musical Players closed here last 
Saturday. The Hyperion Theatre will be 
repaired and renovated during the Sum- 
mer and will reopen for a season of dra- 
matic stock the latter part of August or 
the first part of September. 



HARRY WILLIAMS FORMING CO. 

Pittsburgh, June 4. — Harry Williams, 
of this city, is organizing a stock musical 
comedy company, which will open Ang. 27 
at the Mishler Theatre. Altoona. The com- 
pany will play week stands and its reper- 
toire will include six plays. 



BOWDISH CO. OPENS 

Brookvtlle, Pa., June 2. — The Bowdish 
Stock Co. opened here last week. The 
company is headed by Dorothea Bowdish. 
The band and orchestra, which has always 
been a feature with the Bowdish Stock, has 
been greatly augmented. 



FLORENCE MARTIN HEADS STOCK 

Providence, R. I., June 5. — Florence 
Martin has been engaged to head the 
Charles Lovenberg Stock Co. at Keith's 
here and opened last night in "The 
Cinderella Man." 



MISS FITZHUGH HAS MEASLES 

New Haven, Conn.. June 4. — Venita 
Fitzhugh, who has been singing the prima 
donna roles with the Hyperion Players be- 
fore they closed here recently, is confined 
to her home with the measles. 



EDWARD ORNSTEIN ILL 

Toledo, O., June 3. — Edward Ornstein, 
manager of tbe Wadsworth Dramatic 
Stock Co. at the Palace Theatre, has been 
confined to his bed for two weeks with 
throat trouble. 



PAYTONTOTAKE 

COMPANY TO 

ROCKAWAY 

DENIES TROUBLE AT LEXINGTON 



Corse Payton, who has been conducting 
a stock company at the Lexington Ave- 
nue Opera House, closed the engagement 
there Saturday night, presenting "The 
Lure," and, according to present plans, 
will install practically the same com- 
pany in a. theatre at Rockaway Beach 
for the summer, opening July 1. 

Payton opened the company at the 
Lexington April 24 in conjunction with 
Ray C. Owens and Ruth Napelbaum, but 
after it was in its second week Owens 
withdrew. 

Ever since rumors have been current 
that Owens did so following a disagree- 
ment with Payton and other members of 
the company. 

Payton, however, denies there was any 
trouble or that discord had anything to 
do with the closing, and allows the in- 
ference of an unprofitable season to pass. 

Although the lease for the theatre in 
Rockaway has not yet been signed, Pay- 
ton states quite positively that the com- 
pany will open there. 

WRECK POSTPONES AUTO STOCK 

Brazil, Ind., June 2. — A wreck of their 
train of cars has postponed indefinitely the 
opening of the Guy and McGee Auto Reper- 
toire Show. 

A partnership was entered into recently 
between G. C. Guy, late of the Guy Play- 
ers, and Harry McGee, proprietor of the 
Indiana Auto Clearance Co. of Indiana- 
polis, to open an automobile, or truck show. 
All preparations had been made and the 
cars, trucks and trailers were being ship- 
ped here from Indianapolis. Tbe opening 
was to have been in Worthington, Mr. 
Guy's home. Mr. McGee was with the 
train when tbe wreck occurred between 
Clay City and Brazil, piling up five of the 
cars and almost completely destroying four 
of the heavier trucks. A western play, 
written by Mr. Guy, was to have been 
played on one night stands through . In- 
diana and Ohio. Charles Mercer was to 
be tbe manager and Leon Sapahr the agent 
of tbe company. 



PLAYERS OPEN IN HARLEM 

The Broadway Players, the dramatic 
stock organization which opened yesterday 
at Hurtig and Seamon's Theatre in West 
125th St., nnder the management of A. W. 
Prezet and Harry Brown, with "Mile -a- 
Minute Kendall" as the initial attraction, 
includes Donald MacDonald, Grace Car- 
Hie, Mona Brnns, Dodson Mitchell, Lucille 
La Verne, Beatrice Noyers, Charles Dow 
Clark. Fred W. Strong, Hamilton Mott, 
Pell Trenton and Argyle Campbell, direc- 
tor. "A Pair of Sixes," "The Song of 
Songs." "Cinderella Man" and "Common 
Clay" are some of tbe plays to follow. 



DONNELLY WITH THE PELHAMS 

Linesvuxe, Pa., May 31. — Barry Don- 
nelly, stock character actor, is with The 
Pelhams for the Summer season directing 
and playing a line of character parts. 



LAMAR HAS SCARLET FEVER 

Syracuse, N. Y., June 4. — Edwin 
Lamar, with the Lew Wood Stock Co. at 
the Wieting Opera House, is at the City 
Hospital, suffering with scarlet fever. 



HORNE TO REST AT ROCKAWAY 

Harry Home, director of the Fifth Ave- 
nue Stock Co. which closed at tbe Fifth 
Avenue Theatre. Brooklyn, last Saturday, 
will spend the Summer at Rockaway Beach. 



BOWDISH OPENS 19TH SEASON 
Bkookville, Pa.. June 2. — The Bowdish 
Stock Co. opened its nineteenth annual 
season, Monday, at its headquarters here. 
The company is headed by Dorothea How- 
dish, presenting up-to-date comedies and 
dramas. The roster is as follows: Alfred 
N. Bowdish, owner and manager: Mrs. 
Bowdish, treasurer: Doc Bowdish, busi- 
ness manager: James J. Williams, ad- 
vance; Dana Bailey, leader band nnd 
cornet in orchestra ; Dave Tope, violin 
leader orchestra and baritone in band; 
Harry Richards, drums ; Harry Beams, 
alto; George Bowdish, alto: Charles Bow- 
dish, baritone ; Stanley Hunter, tuba ; 
Frank Dnltod and William Turner, trom- 
bones ; Dale James, clarinet : Dorothea 
Bowdish, Vivian Mayo, Ruby Clements, 
Donald Mack, N. E. Durante, Ralph Mor- 
ton, Perry Norman and William J. Kelsh. 



TEMPEST CO. OPENS 

MnxERSBCBG, Pa., June 2. — The Tem- 
pest Stock Co. opened here last week. The 
roster follows: Larry Conover, leads; 
Francis Gardner, heavies; Leon J. Tem- 
pest, comedian ; Joe Lyonelle, juvenile : K. 
C. Willard, characters; William Wallace, 
Harry White, Henry Williams. Helen 
Forest Russell, leads: Mabelle Leverton, 
second business : Jennie Tempest, heavies : 
Jessie Sanderson, characters, and Rose 
Williams. J. L. Tempest, manager, and 
Myrtle Vetleson. pianist. 



POU CO. LEAVES SCRANTON 

Scranton, Pa., June 2. — The Poli Stock 
Co. has closed its season at the Academy 
of Music. Edward E. Horton, tbe leading 
man. has gone to Wilkes-Barre, opening 
with the Poli Co. there, to play leads, and 
Mae Melvin. the leading lady, has joined 
the McWatters & Webb Co. in Saginaw, 
Mich. 



ALBANY STOCK FINISHES 
Albany, June 4. — The Bleether Play- 
ers Stock Co. closed its season nt Har- 
manus Bleecker Hall, Saturday, in "The 
Marriage of Kitty." It is said that Frank 
M. Thomas and Isabelle Lowe will shortly 
head another company of players to finish 
the Summer season at the hall. 



EDNA PARK WEDS LEADING MAN 

Macon, Ga., June 2. — Edna Park and 
Jack Edwards, leading man and manager 
of the Edna Park Stock Co.. were married 
here last week in the parlors of the Hotel 
Lanier. Mr. Edwards was at one time 
known professionally as Jean Beaubien. 



PHILLIPS IS MADE CAPTAIN 

Charles Phillips, advance agent of Klaw 
& Erlanger and George S. Tyler attrac- 
tions the past season, has entered the 
service of the United States Army and has 
been assigned as captain in tbe Quarter- 
master's Department. 



STOCK TO TRY MUSICAL COMEDY 

Springfield, Mass., June 4. — Next week 
the Poli's Players at tbe Palace Theatre 
will take a try at musical comedy, pre- 
senting "Tbe Little Millionaire." A spe- 
cial chorus has been engaged for tbe pro- 
duction. 



CHAMPL1N CLOSES SUDDENLY 

Springfield, Mass., June 4. — The 
Champlin Comedy Co., after a week at the 
Court Square Theatre, decided not to con- 
tinue the engagement and closed Saturday 
night. 



ROBERTS JOINS PROVIDENCE CO. 

Providence, R. I., June 4. — John Rob- 
erts joins tbe Lyric Light Opera Co. at 
the Providence Opera House tonight in 
"The Chocolate Soldier." 



FRANK ROGERS JOINS BROOKS CO. 

Burlington, la., June 2. — Frank Rog- 
ers is playing characters with the Brooks 
Stock Co. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 




RAILROADS 

PARALYZE 

CIRCUSES 

NEW ENGLAND SHOWS CANT HOVE 



What promises to culminate in a com- 
plete paralysis of circus and carnival 
transportation in the United States, has 
already made itself seriously felt in New 
England and New Jersey, where outdoor 
showmen are meeting with the most seri- 
ous kind of obstacles from the railroads 
that are moving tent shows with little or 
no regularity, sometimes completely 
tying them up, and compelling the can- 
cellation of many important dates. Many 
shows in the New England section are 
at a complete standstill, and it is pre- 
dicted by prominent railroad offic i a l s that 
it will be only a matter of weeks until, 
from one end of the country to the other, 
circuses, big and small, will find it im- 
possible to move. 

This situation is the result of a gov- 
ernment order, sent out from Washing- 
ton, asking railroad companies to co- 
operate with the nation's executives for 
the purpose of conserving the supply of 
coal aa much as practical and, to that 
end, running few or no special trains. 
The order asks the railroad companies to 
give the government their best and first 
service and to keep the lines clear aa 
much as possible in the event that rush 
orders for the movements of troops or 
supplies might be necessary. 

These orders chiefly affect the lines in 
New England, New Jersey and Pennsyl- 
vania where the munition factories are 
running in full swing, and the railroad 
companies in these sections, heeding the 
government's wishes, have naturally put 
a ban upon the movements of circuses. 

The Washburn outfit found it impos- 
sible to move from Newark to Bridge- 
port over the lines of the New York, New 
Haven and Hartford Railroad, and are 
now tied up in Elizabeth trying to de- 
vise ways and means of getting to Ho- 
boken, where they should open next week. 

It is reported that the Sheesley show 
is tied up in Waterbury, Conn., and that 
its prospects of playing New England 
under present conditions are very slim. 

Other shows which are reported to be 
suffering seriously as a result of the 
action of the railroads are: Jess Willard 
and Buffalo Bill Show, playing New Eng- 
land: Colonial Shows, playing Connecti- 
cut; Eastern Amusement Shows, Maine 
and New Hampshire; Great Eastern 
Shows, New Jersey; Johnny Jones Show, 
Pennsylvania; K. G. Barkoot Shows, New 
Jersey; Acme Show, New Jersey; Lee 
Brothers, Pennsylvania; Travers Exposi- 
tion Show, New Jersey, and a score of 
others. 

Besides the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford embargo on circuses, it is re- 
ported that the following Unes have 
taken similar action, and that other 
roads are about to follow suit: Erie, Le- 
high Valley, Boston & Maine, Boston &. 
Albany. 

PARK HAS FREE VAUDE. 
Cincinnati, June 2. — Manager A._ L. 
Riesenberger, of Coney Island, has put into 
force a new policy at the resorf s vaude- 
ville theatre. The shows now are free in- 
stead of paid attractions as in former 
years. On the opening bill this week are : 
Musical Hollanders, Zareli and Elva, Brad- 
ley and Earle. Singing Terrells and the 
Bonnie Kiltie Trio, including Marie Mac- 
NeU and the Pepper Twins. 

NEW SHOWS JOIN RUTHERFORD 

Mosessex, Pa., June 2. — A new Auto- 
drome, new athletic show and LaFleute's 
feature, "The Chinese Dragon," joined the 
Rutherford Greater Shows this week. 



NEW MANAGER AT LUDLOW PARK 

Ludlow, Ky., June 3. — Arthur Wflber, 
last season's manager of the Lagoon, a 
Summer park here, will not be at the 
resort this'year, having connected himself 
with a Detroit park. John V. Hunt will 
be the new Lagoon manager. The opening 
of the resort is still indefinite, the man- 
agement fearing the cool weather and the 
war. A deal for leasing the park, which 
Harry Shockley, Cincinnati theatre man- 
ager; Fred Strontman, park man and Tom 
Cody, wealthy cafe owner, were negotiat- 
ing is said to be off. The Common- 
wealth Amusement Co. will continue to 
operate the park so far as present indica- 
tions show. 



DENVER PARK OPENS 
Denver, June 2. — It looked for a con- 
siderable time this spring as though Den- 
ver would not have an outdoor amusement 
park this Summer, but at the eleventh 
hour the owners of Lakeside park opened 
the resort Decoration Day, having all the 
thrillers, concessions and dance halls going 
at eight-cylinder speed. The Casino The- 
atre will open June 10 with a musical 
comedy company in "Bright Eyes." May- 
belle La Conrve win play the leading in- 
genue roles and the leading juvenile will 
be Frederick Dunham. Philip Friedrich 
will remain as general manager of the 
park. 



CONEY TO HAVE BOARDWALK 

Albany, N. Y., June 1. — Governor 
Whitman today signed the Green Bill, 
which assures a boardwalk for Coney 
Island. By the terms of the bill the State 
is permitted to grant to New York City its 
title to lands bordering the Atlantic Ocean 
between high and low water marks, and 
adjacent to the shore of Coney Island, 
between West Eighth Street and West 
Thirty-Seventh Street, upon which land 
will be constructed a boardwalk promenade 
and recreation piers. 

PETE WHEELER INJURED 

Pittsburgh, June 2. — Pete Wheeler, 
who. with his father, has a concession 
on the Hoss-Lorman Shows, while in this 
city recently, was injured, when a brewery 
truck, which skidded from the street onto 
the sidewalk, knocked him unconscious. He 
was taken to a hospital, where it is said 
he is recovering. 



MISSOULA FAIR CALLED OFF 

Missoula. Mont, June 2. — The Mis- 
soula county fair for this year has been 
called off, because of the war situation. 
The county commissioners declared that 
the gate receipts must equal the expendi- 
tures and that no deficit must be left, upon 
which the fair commission decided not to 
hold the fair. 



CIRCUS LOTS TO BE SCARCE 

Portland, Ore.. June 2. — Because so 
many vacant lots have been plowed up and 
converted into vegetable gardens in this 
section of the country, circuses touring the 
northwest will have difficulty in finding 
ground on which to pitch their tents. 



RUTHERFORD SHOW^ MEN ENLIST 

Monessen, Pa.. June 2. — Hal Davis, 
Louis James, Charles Laurence and 
Stuart Robson have left the Rutherford 
Greater Shows, having enlisted in Uncle 
Sam's Navy. 



LANGFORD HAS PRIVILEGE CAR 

MoNESSEN, Pa., June 2. — Al. Langford 
is in charge of the privilege car with the 
Rutherford Greater Shows, succeeding 
Berney Wallace, who has returned to 
Peru, Ind. 



BARNUM TENT 

BLOWN DOWN 

IN STORM 



KILLS ONE AND INJURES SCORES 



Uniontown, Pa., June 2. — One person 
is dead, three were seriously injured and 
about one hundred were slightly hurt, 
when a severe storm razed the large tent 
of the Barnum & Bailey Circus, showing 
on the Easy Street showgrounds here, yes- 
terday. 

The collapse occurred just before the 
afternoon performance was scheduled to 
start The storm came up suddenly and 
a gust of wind lifted the huge top from 
its supports. Immediately, the poles sup- 
porting the canvas, followed. The canvas 
sagged to the ground, on the beads of the 
people. The crowd became panic-stricken 
and fought for the exits. Scores were 
injured by being trampled on, in addition 
to those hurt by the falling tent. 

The storm terrified the animals of the 
menagerie and six elephants broke loose. 
They ran wild and tore through the can- 
vass to the outside of the grounds before 
they were captured. A gang of a hundred 
men surrounded the animals and a call for 
aid was sent to the city. All the police 
reserves and sheriff's deputies were called 
out. Fifty physicians were rushed to the 
scene and first-aid crews from nearby coke 
works cared for those who were the least 
hurt. 

Seven horses also became unmanageable 
and broke into the crowd, but were cap- 
tured before any serious damage was done. 

The lighting system of the show was 
demolished. The canvas used for the large 
tent was ruined. According to one of the 
officials of the show the loss will be over 
$25,000. 

The performance scheduled for the eve- 
ning bad to be cancelled and the show 
moved to Fairmont, its next stand. 



NICK CARTER SELLS SHOW 

MonessetT, Pa., June 2. — Nick Carter 
has Bold Ms "Zella" show, with the Ruth- 
erford Greater Shows, to Thomas Kelly 
and Eddie Baraett. 



PRESIDENT LAUDS POSTPONEMENT 

Gtjlfpobt, Miss., June 4. — Governor 
Theo. G. Bilbo has received a letter from 
President Wilson, lauding the action of 
the members of the commission of the 
Mississippi Centennial Exposition in post- 
poning the date of the celebration from 
Dec. 10 next to Feb. 22, 1919, on account 
of the war, in patriotic response to the 
appeal of the nation's chief executive. 
When the imposition Commission decided 
to postpone the event they sent a tele- 
gram to that effect to the President, whose 
letter of appreciation follows : « 

"My Dear Governor Bilbo: 

"My secretary has already acknowledged 
the very interesting and important sugges- 
tion you sent me on April 27. May I not 
add my own word of personal acknowl- 
edgement and of genuine appreciation of 
the spirit which prompted the action taken 
with regard to the Exposition. 

"Cordially and sincerely yours, 
(Signed) "Woodrow Wilson." 



OHIO FAIRS EXEMPT FROM TAX 

Cincinnati, June 4. — Myers Y. Cooper, 
president of the Ohio Fair Managers' As- 
sociation, consisting of eighty agricultural 
societies in Ohio, has been advised by Con- 
gressman A. W. Overmyer, of the Commit- 
tee on Agriculture, that in his opinion Ohio 
fairs will be exempt from the war tax on 
admissions to fairs. Mr. Cooper states 
that the fairs of Ohio would prove a very 
valuable adjunct this year in the Govern- 
ment's food production program, as prizes 
are offered to promote stock and grain rais- 
ing. 



FISHER JOINS CAMPBELL SHOWS 

Granite City, in., June 2. — Al. Fisher 
has placed an athletic show with the 
Campbell Shows, joining Monday. In the 
show are Mickey Sheridan. Chicago, 
welterweight ; Jack Moran. St. Louis, 
heavyweight; Young Sampson, wrestling 
champion of Wisconsin, and Cora Taylor, 
lady wrestler. 



ENTOMB BUFFALO BILL'S BODY 

Denver, June 4. — More than 10,000 per- 
sons paid tribute to the memory of Colonel 
William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill), when the 
body of the famous scout was placed is a 
vault blasted from solid rock on top of 
Lookout Mountain, twenty miles from this 
city, last week. At the conclusion of the 
services a bugler sounded taps and when 
the last note had died out a battery fired 
a salute of thirteen guns and the Stars 
and Stripes were hoisted from a flagpole 
over the grave. 



SHOW OVERCOMES OPPOSITION 

Paris, HI., June 2. — A protest was filed 
against the Great Cosmopolitan Shows last 
week to prevent the use of the public 
square for carnival purposes, but after the 
merchants took the matter up everything 
was fixed satisfactorily, and the shows 
opened Monday. 



SHOW HAS TRANSIT TROUBLE 

Cincinnati, June 4. — W. L. Wilkea 
made a flying visit through Cincinnati as 
the first of the Barnum & Bailey advance 
men last week. His show plays here June 
18 and 19. Arthur Diggs is piloting the 
crew of outdoor publicity men. Wilken 
reports trouble in getting transportation. 



NEUMAN BROS. JOIN REISS SHOW 
Chicago, June 2. — The Neuman Broth- 
ers, who have had their two attractions 
with the L. J. Heth Shows, closed with 
that organization at Lockport, 111., last 
week and at once shipped their parapher- 
nalia to Kensington. They are now being 
featured with the Nat Reiss Shows. 



WALSH LOSES BROTHER 

Billings, Okla., June 1. — The brother 
of Jack R. Walsh, promoter and advance 
man with the Goodman Greater Shows, 
died here recently. Mr. Walsh closed with 
the Goodman Shows last January to be 
with his brother. 



RINGLING STRIKE RUMOR FALSE 

Hartford, Conn., June 1. — Lester 
' Thompson, of the Ringling Bros. staff, 
killed the rumor of strike trouble in their 
ranks, when he said that the circus was 
full handed and that they bad drivers 
aplenty. 



TWO ALBANY PARKS OPEN 

Albany, June 2. — Midway Beach Park 
and Electric Park both had auspicious 
openings on Decoration Day, great crowds 
being in attendance. With warm weather, 
a fine Summer season is expected at these 
resorts. 



BOOK TOWN SKIPPED 20 YEARS 

Keene, N. H., June 4. — The circus sea- 
son opens here June 14 with Jess Willard 
and the Buffalo Bill Wild West Shows. 
This will be the first time in twenty years 
the Buffalo Bin aggregation has visited 
here. 



"HUMAN SKELETON" ENLISTS 
Gbeenbebg, Pa., June 2. — Artie Ather- 
ton Noll, the human skeleton with the Bar- 
num & Bafley Circus, and seventeen other 
showmen, have enroUed for mlUtary duty. 



THONET GETS TRAPEZE ACT 

Lewiston, Pa., June 2. — Zamora and 
SenzeU are in their fourth week with Uncle 
Joe Thonet*8 Great Excelsior Shows, doing 
their high trapeze act. 

RUTH LAW TO FLY FOR LOAN 

Ruth Law plans making a flying trip 
across the continent to advertise Liberty 
bonds. She win drop paper bombs featur- 
ing the; loan. 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 





PUBLISHERS LOOKING 

FOR WAR SONG HIT 



Scores of Numbers Competing for the 

Popularity Soma Song Always 

Achieves During Time of War 

In rhe wake of every war of recent 
times there has followed a great popular 
song hit, due no doubt to the fact that in 
all great conflicts music plays a most im- 
portant part. Some one song has always 
been taken up by the soldiers as their 
marching tune and spreading from camp to 
camp baa been adopted as the song of the 
war. From the soldiers, it has been a 
short step to the theatres and from there to 
the homes, where it establishes itself as a 
national song hit. 

Barely has this song been a well writ- 
ten patriotic number, on the contrary it 
has almost always been some trivial, light 
song which even the composer had little 
faith in. Such was "There's a Hot Time 
in the Old Town," song, by the American 
soldiers in the Spanish-American war, yet 
it swept all America like wild fire. In its 
wake came other successful songs, such as 
"Break the News to Mother," "The Blue 
and The Grey" and others, all better 
songs, bnt the soldiers' marching number 
continued its popularity throughout the 
war. 

At the beginning of the present world's 
conflict the English soldiers took up 
"Tipperary" and soon made of it not only 
an English song hit but an American one 
as well, and now that the United States 
have entered the great war publishers are 
wondering what style of song will be the 
one to become the nation's war song. 

There are no less than a score of pa- 
triotic numbers now being rendered in the 
vaudeville houses and the regulars and 
militia marching away are singing a 
variety of songs, most of them songB which 
were popular during the Spanish-American 
war. Some one of these, new or possibly 
old songs, will be the. one to succeed, as 
out of the conflict some one number, pos- 
sibly the poorest of all from a musical or 
lyrical standpoint, will be the one selected. 

WOLFE GILBERT IN CHICAGO 

L. Wolfe Gilbert, professional manager 
and "hit-writer" of Jos. W. Stern & Co., is 
now in Chicago, renewing old acquaint- 
ance and making a host of new ones, as is 
his wont He is daily interviewing scores 
of his professional friends at the Sherman 
Bouse, where he is stopping, and at the 
Chicago offices of Jos. W. Stern & Co., 
119 North Clark Street. 

Mr. Gilbert is completing the Windy 
City's friendship for his late "nut" hit, 
. the sensational "Lily of the Valley," which 
is now being sung by a vast army of 
artists, including Adele Rowland, Sophie 
Tucker, Henry Lewis and Marion Weeks. 
Be is also reminding Chicago of the hit 
qualities of "Love is a Wonderful Thing," 
"It Takes a Long Tall Brown-skin Gal to 
Make a Preacher Lay His Bible Down," 
and the other principal Stern numbers. 

Be will soon have ready for the profes- 
sion his latest work, "Someday Somebody's 
Gonna Get Yon," a "sure-to-get-over" song, 
in the estimation of those who have 
heard it. 



A GREAT RECRUITING SONG 

M. Witmark & Sons have had occasion 
recently to examine hundreds of manu- 
scripts of so-called patriotic songs, but 
their policy on the whole has been to 
rigidly curtail the output of such com- 
positions, the majority of which, it must 
be confessed, display nothing more than 
good intentions on the part of their writers 
whose inability to soar above the dead 
level of unoriginality is almost pathetic. 
But the other day a song showed up that 
appeared to justify an exception being 
made to the rule. It was made, and the 
results have already justified the publica- 
tion of this gong. It bears the title "Tour 
Country Needs Tou Now," is the work 
of Al. Dubin, Rennie Cormack and G. B. 
McConnell, and is a very infectious march 
tune set to words that hit the nail on the 
head with a true ring. Last week Colonel 
Logan, in command of the Boston armory, 
beard "Your Country Needs Yon Now" 
suns; to him over the telephone from the 
local offices of M. Witmark & Sons. He 
was so favorably taken with it that he 
instructed the engagement of four singers 
to dress in khaki uniform, which he sup- 
plied for the occasion, who demonstrated 
the song to the crowds at the band stand 
on the common. The Charlestown Navy 
Yard also evinced a lively interest in the 
new song, because it seems there is a very 
general inclination to agree with the opin- 
ion of Colonel Logan that "Your Country 
Needs Yon Now" is a wonderful song for 
recruiting purposes. 



NEW STYLE PROFESSIONAL COPY 

Jos. W. Stern & Co. now have ready a 
compact professional copy, containing lead 
sheets of eight of their newest numbers, 
including "Princess of the Willow Tree," 
"When a Baddy Meets a Buddy," "Poor 
Cryin' Baby," "Shim-Me-Sha-Wabble," 
"Get a Jazz Band," "Jazbo Johnson's 
Hokum Band," "That's How Far 111 Go 
For Yon" and "It Takes a Long Tall 
BrowDskin Gal." This departure is a most 
convenient one for the artist. 



"HAMMER AND PLOW" FEATURED 
"The Man Behind the Hammer and the 
Plow," Harry Von Tilzer's novel patriotic 
song was featured in nearly every vaude- 
ville house in Greater New York last week. 
So big is the professional demand for this 
number that in three of the big time houses 
six singing acts reported with the song in 
their repertoire. 

Following the usual custom of the the- 
atres, the act first rehearsing the number 
was the one allowed to sing it. 



HARRIS SONGS AT AUDUBON 

"My Little China Doll," and "Thou 
Shalt Not Steal" (a Heat Away), both 
Charles K. Harris numbers, are helping 
the Fox and Mayo act to succeed at the 
Audubon this week. 



JOE KEITH ON WESTERN TRIP 

Joe Keith, of the Remick sales force, 
left today (Wednesday) for a business 
trip to the Pacific coast. This is Mr. 
Keith's first Western trip, his activities 
in the past having been confined to the 
Eastern cities. 



HEADUNERS SING FEIST SONG 

A big list of headline vaudeville artists 
featured the new Leo Feist song "Mother. 
Dixie and You" in New York theatres last 
week. So many pnt the number on that 
a complete list is not available, but a 
few of the leaders were Blossom Seeley, 
Taylor and Arnold, Gene Greene, Al. Her- 
man, Santley and Norton and Bernard 
Granville. 

ORLOB WRITING SCORE 

Harry Orlob is composing the score for 
"Some Girl," a new musical piece, which 
will be presented by Anderson & Weber, 
early next Pall. 



BUY LIBERTY LOAN BONDS 

John L. Golden, the playwright and in- 
cidentally the writer of the lyric of 
"Poor Butterfly," called on his publishers, 
Max and Louis Dreyfus, one day last 
week in the interest of the Liberty Loan 
Bonds. In a space of less than ten min- 
utes' time he disposed of $25,000 worth 
to Max Dreyfus, and Jerome D. Kern, the 
composer, who chanced to happen in at 
the time, was induced to subscribe for 
$50,000. 

Louis Dreyfus was out at the time, 
which was all that prevented Golden from 
bring the sale up to a round $100,000. 

NEW FORSTER NUMBERS 

Forster, music publisher of Chicago, 
has recently released two new songs 
which are meeting with much success in 
the profession and bid fair to rival in 
popularity of the famous "Johnny." The 
new numbers are "All I Need Is Just a 
Girl Like You" and "Climbing the Ladder 
of Love." 



A NOVEL PATRIOTIC SONG 

Harry Pease and Gilbert Dodge have 
in Tm Not Going to Buy Any Summer 
Clothes," a novelty patriotic song which, 
although just released, is attracting much 
attention. 

Although of a decidedly patriotic na- 
ture the song is a pleasant departure 
from the scores of "flag" numbers. It is 
published by the Bernard Granville Pub- 
lishing Co. 

"HIAWATHA" COMPOSER IN N. Y. 

Charles N. Daniels, composer of the 
famous "Hiawatha," is spending a few 
weeks in New York. Mr. Daniels is now 
a publisher and is located in San Fran- 
cisco. 



TEDDY MORSE'S "LULLABY" 

Teddy Morse's new semi-high-class bal- 
lad, "Love's Lullaby," is being taken up 
by scores of the singers of the better 
grade songs with whom it is scoring a 
decided success. 

The new number is one of the most 
melodious and singable songs ever writ- 
ten by this talented writer. 

DALY AND COOL WITH JEROME , 

Daly and Cool, a young song-writing 
team of much promise, have signed with 
the William Jerome Co. "Cotton Pickin' 
Time in Alabam' " the first published 
number from the pens of these writers, is 
attracting much attention, and is among 
the most popular numbers of the Jerome 
catalogue. 



COHAN'S PATRIOTIC SONG 

Among the score or more new patriotic 
songs which are being featured this sea- 
son George M. Cohan's "Over There" has 
a prominent place. This number, although 
less than a month old, is being sung by 
some of the best known acts. 



HARRIS HOME SONG GOES BIG 

Louis Conn, professional manager of the 
Charles K. Harris office, claims that "It's 
a Long Time Since I've Been Home" is 
leading the back-home numbers. Goelet, 
Harris and Maurey, at the Eighty-first 
Street Theatre, and Van and Schenck, at 
the Colonial Theatre, are both cleaning 
up this week with the number. 



MAIL'S SONG IS SUNG 

"When Your Boy Comes Back to You," 
a patriotic song by Gordon V. Thompson, 
sponsored by the New York Evening Mail, 
was sung at all the Proctor houses last 
week. The words of the chorus were 
flashed on the screen. 



JEROME H. REMICK IN N. Y. 

Jerome H. Remick, following out his 
announced plan of a month ago spent 
last week in New York. He was par- 
ticularly active in his local professional 
department. 



SHARPS AND FLATS 

By TEDDY MORSE. 



George Botsford, noted arranger, quar- 
tetter, producer, pea-'nlst, remover of harm 
from harmonies, and inserter of mellow in 
melodies, rises to the boiling point and 
wishes to be heard. George has been suf- 
fering long in silence, and at last wants 
it recorded that the following should be. 
pasted on the walls of each piano room, 
and labelled "Goat Getters." 

1 — The singer who starts talking just as 
you get through playing the vamp. 

2— The "friend" of the singer who car- 
ries on a conversation while you are dem- 
onstrating a song. 

3 — The singer who says he can read 
notes and can't. 

4- — The singer who asks you to play the 
introduction, when you have played the 
song, including the Introduction, enough 
times to have taught a bund man the 
words. 

5 — A quartette with only three people. 
Likewise a two-act with one missing. 

6— The vocalist who uses his own words 
and hates to be corrected. 

7 — The wise one who says "I sing all my 
songs in 'B' flat." 



OLMAN IN SAN FRANCISCO 

Abe Olman, the composer, is in San 
Francisco, introducing the new Forster 
songs to the trade and profession. 

A GREAT "DIXIE" SONG 

The Broadway Music Corp. has a great 
"Dixie" number in Albert Von Tilzer 
and Chas. McCarron's "When the Sun 
Goes Down in Dixie." 



That Star Song Booster, Homer Rode- 
beaver, put over a new one at the Billy 
Sunday Tabernacle recently. Before slip- 
ping the songs to the audience, Homer 
blithely produced a pack of cards and did 
a routine of tricks that bad everybody 
dazed. Then, before they were fully aware 
of what they were doing, be had them all 
warbling at the top of their voices his 
plug-song, "Brighten the Corner Where 
You Are." 



Have you seen the gas company's ads, 
reading "Cook With Gas"? While that 
might be true, still the better way would 
be "Cook with Witmark." Alphonse is 
officially known as "Al," and though 
scarred and seared by many years in the 
music business, has defeated all comers 
who have been after his job as "P. M." 



Every once in a while a great song is 
written. This time it's an Irish one, by 
lyrical Bartley Costello, who has always 
been credited with "Where the Biver 
Shannon Flows." The new one is called 
"The wish of all wishes in an Irishman's 
heart," and the chorus is worth the telling 
here: 
"Take the chains from old Erin, unfetter 

her wings. 
Make her free as the thrush that her wood- 
land song sings. 
Let Tarn's wild harp wake the hills as of 

yore, 
And tell all the world Ireland's Ireland 

once more. 
Give peace and content to her valleys and 

fens, 
We've riches enough in her lakes and her 

glens; 
Leave God to watch o'er us and guide the 

old dart. 
That's the wish of all wishes in an Irish- 
man's heart." 



All of Cyclonic Eva Tanguay's songs of 
this season were written by clever little 
Eddie Weber, who used to be the Weber of 
Weber, Dolan and Eraser. Eddie led the 
orchestra in Eva's specialty just like a reg- 
ular high brow conductor. 



HAROLD DELLON WITH FEIST 

Harrold Dellon for the past year pro- 
fessional manager for the Harms company, 
is now connected with the Leo Feist house. 



James P. Sinnott, of the Evening Mail, 
echoes our sentiments with: 

"Jazz, for you the razz! 
I think you're bad, I think you're sad — 
Although you make the dancers glad. 
The yukalay, we heard last May, 
Was sweeter far, in every bar, 
Than, at your best, you ever are. 
You draw the crowd, altho, you're loud. 
But you will ge; then I will crow. 
And tell the world. "I told you so." 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




FOR ADVERTISING 

RATES 
Phone Randolph 5423 



ATTRACTIONS 

HAVING GOOD 

RUNS 



TO CONTINUE THROUGH SUMMER 



The attractions at Chicago theatres have 
. settled down for a good Summer's ran, the 
one new play of last week being "The 
Pawn." 

Frank Keenan, who made his return to 
the legitimate stage in this play, after two 
years of working in motion pictures, re- 
ceived unanimous praise from the critics 
for his good work, but all agreed that the 
new play is not of big enough calibre for 
him. 

In the play the central figure is a 
Japanese noble, formerly with the diplo- 
matic service, but now in the secret service. 
He is the guardian of a yonng man and a 
woman, half American and half Japanese, 
and out of the romance of these young 
people grows the story of the play. 

The cast supporting Mr. Keenan in- 
cludes Marjorie Wood, Blanche Yurka, 
lone Magrane, James Crane, Malcolm 
Duncan, Desmond Gallagher, Edward G. 
Robinson, Joseph Selman and Assi Oakl. 

At Cohan's Grand, "Turn to the Right" 
remains the attraction. It is the twenty- 
first week of a prosperous engagement. 

"Very Good Eddie" increases in popu- 
larity and is now in its twelfth week at 
the Garrick Theatre, and is due for a 
prolonged stay in this city. 

"Seven Chances" scored a success at the 
Cort Theatre, and is in the third week of 
an engagement likely to ran throughout 
the Summer. 

"The Bird of Paradise" continues at 
the Olympic Theatre and is in its seventh 
week. As an added attraction, S. M. 
Kiawe, a native Hawaiian, who was in 
the original cast of the play, now sings 
and plays with the other Hawaiian boys 
and introduces the hula dance during each 
performance. 

FILM PRODUCER LOSES FIGHT 

When Judge David and a jury bad seen 
an exhibition of the photoplay, "Protect 
Your Daughter," they dismissed the pe- 
tition of Arthur T. Deamorcaui, producer, 
for a writ of mandamus to compel issuance 
of a permit to show the film. The Judge 
ruled that, notwithstanding that the pic- 
ture had undergone cutouts, the city could 
not be forced to issue a permit for its 
public showing as it had never been pre- 
sented to the censors for approval. Maj. 
Funkhouser may issue the permit, however, 
for showing it in its deleted form. 



" '76" SHOWN WITHOUT RIOT 

"The Spirit of 'TO," the initial screen 
showing of which brought about a riot 
locally and which has since had objection- 
able scenes modified, was shown to a public 
audience in its revised form in Orchestra 
Hall Monday. There were no outward in- 
dications that scenes depicting the part 
played by the British and Indians in the 
Revolutionary War aroused any harsh 
feelings. 



CARLO JUST ESCAPES INJURY 

The emergency brakes on the elevators 
in the Hotel Richmond probably avoided 
a fatal accident last week when Earle, 
the equilibrist, was caught between the 
floor and the top of the elevator. The 
brakes held the moving cage so that be 
escaped with but a severe wrench and a 
few bruises. 



CHORISTER IS PROMOTED 

Zoe Norvall, appearing as one of the 
favorite entertainers at the Winter Gar- 
den, has been lifted from among the pretty 
choristers to a prima donna part lit the 
revue. 



KESSLER, ACTOR, SUES HOTEL 

Joseph Kessler, the Yiddish actor and 
manager of the Empire, has filed suit 
through his attorney, Max Korshak, for 
$100,000 damages against the Hotel Mor- 
rison, as the result of a "fracas" that oc- 
enred on May 28. Kessler claims that a 
party, including Boris Thomasbefsky, Wil- 
liam Mendelsohn, Joe Rumshinsky, the 
composer of "The Broken Violin" ; Mrs. 
Mendelsohn, Annie Melzer and Minnie Hy- 
man, soubrettes of the Thomasbefsky "Up- 
town and Down Town" company, were in- 
sulted in the hotel by two men, said to be 
house detectives. Kessler says he him- 
self was severely beaten. 



L A. T. S. E. MEMBERS ENLIST 

Local No. 2 of the International Alli- 
ance of Theatrical Stage Employees an- 
nounces that five of its members have en- 
listed for service at the front. They are 
James Ferazullo, electrician ; Monte O'Con- 
nor, electrician ; Tommy O'Brien, elec- 
trician ; Arthur Zohn, electrician, and 
Frank T. Widman, electrician. President 
C. B. Savage stated that all members of 
the organization who have recruited for 
the cause will be exempt from all dues and 
other assessments while in service. 



FILM STAR IS PLAYWRIGHT 

Anita King, the Paramount picture ' star, 
who appeared' as the feature of a recent 
Wilson Theatre bill, made the announce- 
ment before leaving the city for Holly- 
wood, Cal., where she is to work out a 
few more picture dramas, that she will 
shortly appear in vaudeville in a playlet 
entitled "The Heart of a Man," of which 
she is the author. 



JEWISH STOCK DRAWS 

Since the opening of Boris Thomashef- 
sky's Yiddish stock company, in "Dp Town 
and Down Town" at the Strand Theatre, 
business has been satisfactory. Manager 
Ellis Glickman says that seats are selling 
three weeks in advance. The organiza- 
tion is to remain at the Strand for the 
entire Summer, later changing the pro- 
gram. 



BLANCO OPENS CAFE 

Dan Blanco and Ray McCloskey threw 
open their Grand Cafe June 2, and, in ad- 
dition to the entertaining qualities of Dan 
himself, offered such well-known local 
singers as Bert White, Bernie Adler, and 
a syncopated band. 



THREE ACTS FILL IN 
Cross and Josephine, Beatrice Herford 
and the Dumont Trio were sent to fill the 
date at the Orpbeum, Milwaukee, where the 
Gertrude Hoffman Revue would have 
played " had it not been held over at the 
Majestic, here. 



CORTEZ AND PEGGY ENGAGED 

Cortez and Peggy, who bill themselves as 
"The World Wonder Dancers," closed with 
"Tli,- Love Mill" at the Illinois Theatre 
Saturday night and opened as a feature of 
the show on the La Salle Hotel roof this 
week. 



RALPH LOCKE RE-ENLISTS 

Ralph Locke, of the act known as "The 
Cure," which appeared at the Majestic last 
week, closed his vaudeville tour with that 
engagement, he having re-enlisted to serve 
with the heavy field artillery. Eastern Di- 
vision. 



COUNT PERRONE SCORES 

Count Perrone, of La Scala Opera fame, 
and more recently seen in the Hotel Tul- 
ler cafe, in Detroit, is now creating some- 
what of a sensation in bis repertoire of 
Italian comedy at the Winter Garden. 



LILLIAN BERNARD MAY MARRY 

Lillian Bernard, a cabaret singer, let it 
slip recently that she is to be married to 
a Moline, 111., plow-manufacturer in the 
early future. 



MANAGERS WILL 

BUY $100,000 

OF BONDS 

RIDD1NGS HEADS MOVEMENT 



At a special meeting of the Chicago The- 
atre Managers' Association, it was unani- 
mously voted last week to purchase $100,- 
000 worth of Liberty Bonds. 

The action was taken following an 
urgent request of the United Managers' 
Protective Association and was the first 
response made. When the Chicago man- 
agers found that managers all over the 
country were being called upon to aid in 
the sale, they immediately called a meet- 
ing and the $100,000 was pledged. 

Harry J. Biddings wired the New York 
organizations of the Chicago managers' ac- 
tion and has notified local managers that 
it is their patriotic duty to buy bonds. 
The members of the association are get- 
ting in touch with all local managers and 
are securing subscriptions. 

Committees are being formed to under- 
take the campaign to boost the fund and 
turn it in as soon as possible. 



GAY SISTERS QUIT ACT 

The three Gay Sisters drew out of Zer- 
maine's "The Whirl of Song and Dance" 
Saturday after the engagement at the 
Rialto. They will continue in their for- 
mer act. 

The Zcrmaine act has twenty-two 
weeks booked, starting with the Pan- 
tages time. 



RIOTING CLOSES THEATRES 

Owing to the recent race rioting in East 
St. Louis all the motion picture theatres 
in that city have been ordered closed at 6 
P. M. The rioting started following a meet- 
ing of the city council, at which labor 
leaders protested against the wholesale 
shipments of negro laborers Into East St. 
Louis. ' 

SULLY AND PLOWS JOIN 

Harry Sully, the Russian pianist, and 
Charles B. Plows, last seen with the 
"Modern Cinderella," have joined as a 
two-act, and will be seen next season in 
a comedy entitled "Just Fish," written 
by Billy K. Wells. 

BISMARCK TO OPEN JUNE 27 
Tbe Bismarck Summer Garden an- 
nounces its opening for June 27. Until 
then Edward Beefs "Marigold Revel" will 
hold attention with the Javanese and 
Egyptian slave dances of Ada Forman an 
extra feature. 



DOG RACE WINNER IN VAUDE. 

Fred Hartman, who won a race with 
dogs last winter from Winnipeg to St. 
Paul (522 miles), is making financial use 
of the win with the aid "of a few hundred 
feet of film, filling vaudeville dates in the 
Middle West 



"MOULIN ROUGE" OPENS 

Chicago's "Moulin Rouge," constructed 
on the site of the old Standard Hall on 
Clark Street, opened to the public Me- 
morial Day. This resort is patterned 
closely after the famous "Moulin Rouge" 
of Paris. 



WILL RE-ENTER MUSICAL COMEDY 

Ralph Riggs and Katherine Witchie, 
the dancers who appeared on the Majestic 
bill last week, went direct to New York 
following that engagement to re-enter 
musical comedy. 

MISS EARLE REJOINS "EDDIE" 

Florence Earle has rejoined the "Very 
Good, Eddie," company at the Garrick 
Theatre here. 



BEILIN DENIES RUMOR. 

AI. Beilin, first assistant to Tom Quig- 
ley, of the M. Witmark Music Company's 
Chicago office, wishes to have it denied 
that he is no longer with that concern, a 
recent rumor stating that he had suc- 
ceeded Marvin Lee as professional man- 
ager for the F. J. A. Forster music shop. 
To quote Beilin, he "is with Witmark's 
big black safe for life," and Lee gives no 
definite change of position in his own 
behalf. 



POLICE CLOSE FILM THEATRE 

The police closed the Alvin motion pic- 
ture theatre on West Chicago Avenue, 
last week, owing to owner Kazimer Jan- 
kowski having failed to comply with an 
order from headquarters to place his fire 
guard, Frank Lacoy, in uniform. The 
show was stopped and only tbe action of 
the police prevented an outburst on the 
part of the audience, who demanded their 
money back. 



NEW CORPORATION FORMED 

The newly formed corporation of the 
American Amusement Managers' Associa- 
tion will begin active operations on June 
4. It will act as representative of bands, 
orchestras, dancers, vaudeville acts, re- 
vues, and, in fact, everything that comes 
under the head of amusement. The di- 
rectors are M. I. Suranyi, T. Kendall 
Woodburn, Stephen Juhasz and Charles 
H. Doll. 



SPEARE BOOKED 20 WEEKS 

Fred Speare, who was at McVicker's 
laBt week with the "Every Man's Sister" 
act, has accepted twenty weeks' bookings 
over the Pantages Circuit, opening July 
15 in Minneapolis. Speare was formerly 
with several A. H. Woods' productions, 
and was featured with Barney Bernard 
and Alex Corr in "Potash and Perlmut- 
ter." 



INDICTMENTS IN MOVIE WAR 

Ten business agents and men alleged to 
be sluggers were named in two indictment! 
charging conspiracy, which the grand jury 
returned June 1 in the local moving pic- 
ture war. Some were charged with in- 
timidating theatre owners and extorting 
money from them. 



LOVETT OPENS OFFICE 

George Lovett, the author, producer 
and manager, has actively begun opera- 
tions in bis own office, in the Crilly Build- 
ing. With the assistance of a partner, 
the firm will produce vaudeville acts in 
addition to publishing several musical 
numbers. 



MAY TAYLOR PLAYS PARKS 

May Page Taylor, billed as "That Dan- 
gerous Girl" in her novelty songalogue, 
who closed recently on the W. V. M. A 
and U. B. O. circuits, opened on the Rimy 
& Grant circuit of parks in Cleveland this 
week. 



TYRELLS IN MINNEAPOLIS 

Ned and Majie Tyrell (Dancing Tyrells) 
Australian Whirlwind dancera, have 
closed their season in the vaudeville the- 
atres and will fill a summer engagement 
at tbe West Hotel, Minneapolis. 

PLAN THEATRE OF MAGIC 

The Society of American 'Magicians, 
last week, at a dinner held at the Hotel 
McAlpin, took the first steps toward the 
establishment of a Theatre of Magic in 
New York. Among those present were 
Harry Kellar, Houdini, Charles J. Carter, 
Adrian Plate, Richard Van Dien and 
Adelaide Herrmann. The magicians of 
this country have long desired to have 
a home theatre devoted exclusively to 
magic located in this city similar to the 
Egyptian Hall, in London, made famous 
by the late John N. Maskelyne. Up to 
the present their efforts in this direction 
have been fruitless. 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




MANY LOSE OUT 

IN FRANCHISE 

RACE 

MANY APPLICATIONS WERE MADE 



Many burlesque producers were doomed 
to disappointment last week after the 
meeting of the American Burlesque Asso- 
ciation, which took up the awarding of new 
franchises. The applicants more than ex- 
ceeded the number of franchise holders on 
the present circuit, and, as only three fran- 
chises were given out, about twenty-five 
producers who had their irons in the fire 
were disappointed. 

Those who were lucky enough to receive 
one of the coveted prizes are the Billy K. 
Wells Co., which will present a show to 
be produced by Billy K. Wells; the 
"Speedway Girls" Co., Inc., which will 
produce a show under the direction of 
Charles M. Baker, and the New York 
Burlesque Company, the franchise of which 
will be operated by George Belfrage. 

Among some of those who applied for 
the franchises were Henry P. Nelson, Joe 
Levitt, Peter S. Clark, John M. White- 
head, of Chicago; George S. Betts, Max 
Spiegel, Joe Weber, Joe Howard, of Phil- 
adelphia ; George Stroud, Hamilton, Ont. ; 
Lew Talbot, Rube Nernsteln, Jean Bedeni, 
Kelly and Damsel, Billy Watson, Jake 
Lieberman and Harry Strouse. 
. It took the board of directors consider- 
able time to determine who should receive 
the franchises. All of the applicants 
were known as reliable producers, and 
therefore no discrimination could be made 
in the awards. Two of the franchises 
given bad been cancelled during the past 
season. One was that operated by the 
late Frank Calder, which was cancelled at 
the time of his death, but remained in 
operation until the end of the regular sea- 
son. The other was that held by Herz & 
Ream, of Detroit, which had been cancelled 
by General Manager Peck, whose action 
was sustained by the board of directors. 
It is said that the reason for this cancel- 
lation was the fact that the heads of the 
circuit could not ascertain who were the 
persons responsible for the production of 
"Hello Paris," which was operated on that 
franchise last season. The other franchise 
was a new one, increasing the shows from 
35 to 36. 



PICK NEW TITLES FOR SHOWS 

The list of shows announced for next 
season's American Wheel includes a num- 
ber of New titles: 

The "U. S. Beauties" has been changed 
to "The Orientals"; "Tango Queens" to 
"Some Babies"; "Thoroughbreds" to "In- 
nocent Maids" ; "Beauty, Youth and Folly" 
to "The Army and Navy Girls"; "High 
Life Girls" to "Mile-a-Minnte Girls" 
(operated by Billy K. Wells) ; "Cherry 
Blossoms" to "Jolly Girls": "Tourists" to 
"Forty Thieves," and "Frolics of 1917" to 
"The Aviators." 



HERK ELECTED ASS'N HEAD 

The Burlesque Producers' Protective As- 
sociation held their annual meeting May 
31 and elected the following Board of 
Directors: I. Herk, President; Jas. B. 
Cooper, Vice-President; Barney Gerard, 
Secretary; Charles Franklyn, Treasurer; 
Sam Levy, member of the Board. Every 
one of the A B. C. Shows was represented. 
The treasurer reported a balance of over 
$6,000 on hand, which will be invested in 
A. B. C. stock. 



JOYCE TO MANAGE PARK 

"Mike" Joyce, manager of the Star The- 
atre, Brooklyn, will manage Thompson's 
Park, at Rockaway Beach, which opened 
on Decoration Day, during the Summer 
months. 



BURLESQUE CLUB TICKET PICKED 

At a meeting of the Burlesque Club, 
held on May 31, nominations for officers 
were made. Sam, Lewis, president of the 
organization, although urged to continue 
in office, declined. Henry C Jacobs, of 
Jacobs and Jermon, was nominated for 
the head of the ticket. The election will 
be held next week. 

A number of new members were ad- 
mitted and many others proposed. The 
treasurer's and the secretary's reports 
showed very encouraging conditions. The 
club rooms are becoming the daily 
rendezvous for burlesquers. 

WILLIAMS HAS FULL CAST 

The "Girls from Joyland" will line up 
for next season with the following prin- 
cipals: Billy Gilbert, Bobby Barker, 
George Bown, Dan Diehl, William E. 
Barker, Ruth Barker, Bulah Kennedy, Ida 
Nicoli, Joe Woodman, John Burke, Joe 
Scullen, and a chorus of twenty-two girls. 

The show will carry eight complete sets 
of scenery, all new. The costumes will 
also be new. The musical numbers will 
be produced by Barney Fagan. 



TAYLOR COMPLETES CAST 

Charles E. Taylor has engaged the fol- 
lowing for "The Darlings of Paris" for 
next season : 

Matt Kolb, principal comedian ; Jimmy 
Parelle, Hebrew; Tom Howard, eccentric; 
Joe Lyons, straight; Boomer and Cuin- 
mings, singers ; Lucia Arnold, characters ; 
Josie Taylor, ' soubrette ; Mason Sisters, 
dancers, and Miss Billy Bailus. The show 
will be billed as a double show — four bur- 
lesques in four, scenes. 



BERTRAND PRODUCING NUMBERS 

Boston, June 2. — Frank Bertrand is 
producing the score and musical numbers 
for Waldron's "Bostonian Burlesquers,'' 
playing a Summer engagement at the Ca- 
sino Theatre. He will also do similar 
work for the Waldron road show, which 
opens in August with Frank Finney. 



"BOWERYS" TO PLAY 4 WEEKS 

The "Bowery Burlesquers" left the Ca- 
sino, Brooklyn, last Saturday night and 
jumped to Toledo, where they will play a 
four weeks' engagement. 



WALDMANN TO WORK AT PARK 

Kansas Crrr, May 27. — After a two 
weeks rest, since the closing of the Gaiety 
here, Treasurer Fred Waldmann has taken 
up the duties of treasurer at the local 
Summer park which opened yesterday. 



BUCK STADLER IN TOWN 
Buck Stadler, manager of the Palace, 
Baltimore, was a visitor at the Columbia 
headquarters last week. He announced 
before leaving the city that the Palace 
would open August 11. 



COLEMAN WRITING SHOW BOOK 

Dan Coleman, who will be featured again 
next season with Harry Hastings Big 
Show, is writing a new book and music 
for the show, which will have several 
more new scenes. 



BURLESQUERS GET VAUDE. TIME 
Paul Cunningham and Florence Bennet, 
who just closed their season with Fred 
Irwin's "Majesties" in Buffalo, started an 
eight weeks' tour over the Fox and Loew 
circuits last week. 



KAHN HAS COMEDY QUARTETTE 

The B. F. Kahn Stock Company, at the 
Union Square, has Billy Spencer, Bert 
Weston, Frank Mackey and Geo. Walsh 
as comedians this week. 



BUY LIBERTY BONDS 
E. M. Rosenthal, manager of the Slid- 
ing Billy Watson Show, and Lou Hurtig, 
have made application for one thousand 
dollars worth of Liberty Bonds each. . 



GEO. W. PECK IS 
NEW COLUMBIA 

WHEEL HEAD 

ANNUAL ELECTION HELD 



The annual meeting and election of of- 
ficers of the American Burlesque Associa- 
tion, at which George Peck was elected 
President and General Manager of the Cir- 
cuit, to succeed Judge M. Muller, was held 
in the offices of the association in the 
Columbia Theatre Building, last Friday. 

Judge Muller explained to the members 
of the Board tbat be would be unable to 
attend to the duties of the office of Pres- 
ident and Treasurer for another year on 
account of the pressure of business in Cin- 
cinnati. He asked them to consider his 
request for retirement from the office. 
Efforts were made to persuade him to re- 
main in office, but he was determined and 
stated he believed tbat General Manager 
Peck could far better handle the situation 
than he, and suggested him for the office. 
Peck was then nominated and elected. 

For the office of Secretary and Treas- 
urer, William V. Jenning, Assistant Gen- 
eral Manager of the Circuit, was proposed 
and elected. George E. Lothrop, of Bos- 
ton, was re-elected as Vice-President 

The size of the Board of Directors was 
increased from five to six members. Those 
elected for the ensuing year are I George 
W. Peck, Judge Muller, George E. Loth- 
rop, I. Herk, Chas. Franklin and W. V. 
Jennings. 

Upon the application of the Burlesque 
Producing Managers' Mutual Association, 
fifty shares of treasury stock, at a par 
value of $100 a share, were voted to the 
organization. 

A matter that received serious considera- 
tion at the meeting was the question of 
establishing theatres in Pittsburgh, , CM- 
cago and Hoboken. Up to the time of the 
meeting, no satisfactory agreement' had 
been reached with the owners, so it waa 
decided to allow the matter to remain in 
abeyance until such time as a special meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors would be 
called to take up the proposition. 

There were several minor matters in ref- 
erence to the circuit also taken up and 
disposed of. 



CLARK SIGNS COMPANY 

Pete Clark has signed the following for 
his "New York Girl" company for next 
season: Harry Bentley, Clare Evans, Dru- 
lard and Morgan, Mills and Lockwood, 
Francis Tate Botsford, Mammie Mitchell, 
Mable Orell, Maury Clark, Irving Sands 
and twenty girls. Pete Clark, manager; 
Julius Micheals. agent; Rudolph Bauman, 
leader; Mable MeVey, wardrobe mistress; 
Roy Bergess, carpenter; Ed. Kempton, 
property man. 



"STEP LIVELY" ROSTER COMPLETE 

The roster of the "Step Lively Girls" for 
next season will be: Rich (Shorty) Mc- 
Allister, Maudie Heath, Harry T. Shan- 
non, Raymond Paine, Nettie Hyde, Rhea 
Hess, Dotson. Jack Mnldoon, manager; 
Roger Pierson, agent; Alex Hyde, leader, 
Jack Loftus. carpenter; Jim Prendergaat, 
props. 



HURTIG GOING FISHING 

Lou Hurtig, manager of Hurtig and Sea- 
mons Theatre, will leave New York Jnne 
9 with a party of friends for Mt Clemens, 
Mich., where he will spend four weeks 
fishing and bathing. 



PIERSON TO HAVE ONLY 1 SHOW 

Arthur Pierson announces that he will 
have but one show in burlesque next sea- 
son. "Step Lively Girls." He was to have 
another franchise bnt it was called off. 



FIENBERG MAKES CHANGE 

Charlie Fienberg, for the past two sea- 
sons manager of the Grand Theatre, at 
Trenton, N. J., has been appointed manager 
of Max Spiegel's Grand Theatre, at Hart- 
ford, for next season. W. C. JlacNau^h- 
ton, who has been at the Empire, Albany, 
for several seasons, has been appointed 
advertising agent, 



EXECUTIVE STAFFS PICKED 

The executive staffs of the Theatrical 
Operating Company shows for the coining 
season will be: "Twentieth Century 
Maids," E. W. Chipman, manager; Fred 
Jacobs, agent; "Million Dollar Dolls," 
Charles Falk. manager; Barry Abbott, 
agent; "Bon Tons," Ira Miller, manager; 
Jack Leslie, agent. 



LEWIS & DODY ENGAGED 

Lewis and Dody, who recently formed 
a new partnership, have been signed by 
Hurtig & Seamon to appear in a new 
show on the Columbia Circuit next sea- 
son, which will be known as "Hello, 
America." Manny Rosenthal will man- 
age the show and Frank Metzger will be 
in advance. 



BEEF TRUST CLOSES SEASON 

IH.tboit, Mich., June 3. — The Billy 
Watson Beef Trust closed last night at 
the Gaiety, here, a record-breaking season 
of forty-two weeks. After making a few 
repairs in bis Orpheum, at Paterson, N. J., 
Watson will go to the mountains for the 
Summer. 



ESTABLISH REST ROOM 

Mrs. B. F. Kahn has established a 
room at the Union Square Theatre, adjoin- 
ing the Green Room, which will be known 
as the Rest Room, to be used in case any 
member of the Kahn stock company is 
taken ill during the performance. 



BURLESQUERS GOING CAMPING 

Joe Daly, carpenter with the Billy 
Watson Show; Will Ninkin. Ray Erhardt 
and Bob Smith of Hurtig & Seamon's 
Theatre, will leave New York shortly on 
a camping trip through the Catskills. 

REBER AND HERMAN ON FOX TIME 

Gus Reber and Herman Gibson opened 
on the Fox time Monday. They will play 
all the Fox and Loew houses in and around 
New York for the Summer in their sing 
ing and dancing act. 



KAHN HAS NEW PRIMA DONNA 

Arline Frederick will make her first ap- 
pearance in burlesque next week as prima 
donna of the Union Square Stock Com- 
pany. Miss Fredericks has been in vaude- 
ville the past esason. 



PETE CLARK SIGNS TEAM 

Pete Clark has signed Drulard and Mor- 
gan for his "New York Girl Co." They 
are a vaudeville team be caught ont West, 
doing a novelty singing and dancing act. 



BARRETTS AT SUMMER HOME 
.Mr. and Mrs. Geo. A. Barrett after a 
season with Izey Herk's "World of Folly.'* 
are at their Summer home at Great Kills, 
Staten Island, N. Y. 



HOLMES AND FOX AT PEKIN 
Ben Holmes and Leona Fox opened with 
the Summer show at the Pekin this week. 
They will remain there until the season 
starts in August. 



WATSON BUYS LIBERTY BONDS 

The Watson Sisters, daughters of Billy 
Watson, are the holders of two $1,000 
Liberty Bonds, presented to them by their 
father. 



WATSON GOING INTO FILMS 

"Sliding" Billy Watson leaves New Terk 
Jnne 10 for the Pacific Coast where he 
will appear in pictures. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



HARRY WEBER presents 

BERTEE flR JACK 




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IN THEIR NEW ACT 

The Sergeanteene 



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By JACK ARNOLD 



Personal Direction: GEORGE O'BRIEN 







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Gowns by Mme. HAMMER 

AT THE NEW BRIGHTON THEATRE, THIS WEEK, JUNE 4 



OLGA MISHKA COMPANY 

Extend thanks to the members of the United Booking 
Offices for the many kindnesses and courtesies 

received the past season. 

Direction— PETE MACK 

WEEK OF JUNE 18th AT B. F. KEITH'S RIVERSIDEjTHEATRE 



SL"S£ Hear GRACE HAZARD Sing 1RVI ™ 
"You've Cot to Be American to Feel That Way" 



Wm. 





Ada 



In a Song or Two and a Dance or So 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



BILLY 



DICK 



WILSON and STEWART 



2 Boys and a Piano 
n. v. A. 



MAY AND BILLY EARLE 

Present 
"LOVE ME, LOVE MY DOG" By Otto T. Johnson, Aansted by the Dog 



ANDREW COPELAND 

America's Premier Colored Singing Comedian 

Direction — PETE MACK. IN VAUDEVILLE 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

(Continued from page 9) 



BETTS, CHIDLOW & HART. 

Theatre— Proctor's 58th Street. 

Style— Comedy skit. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — One special. 

This turn, which is composed of two 
men and a woman, is billed as "The 
Club House Trio." The probable reason 
for this is that two men are seen emerg- 
ing from a club house and entering into 
a discussion as to who should be the 
chairman of an entertainment com- 
mittee. 

The young woman then comes along, 
and they both try to act in an officious 
manner with her. Finally, the straight 
man wins out and learns that she was 
to have appeared at the entertainment 
that evening. She tells him that her two 
partners are late. He tells her to go 
into the club house and change her 
clothes while he will go and get into 
communication with her friends. 

The other man, an English chappy, 
then sings a character song, after which 
he indulges in very commonplace talk 
with his partner until the arrival of the 
girl. The girl and the Englishman then 
sing a "Query" song, which is well pre- 
sented. 

The girl then informs the men that 
her partners cannot get there, and asks 
them to help out They do this by 
rendering "Hong Kong," which is the 
closing number of the act 

This act Is hardly strong enough for 
the neighborhood houses. There seems 
to be a considerable lack of "pep" and 
speed in the turn. It should be entirely 
revamped and more wholesome material 
obtained, for, in its present shape, it is 
one that will hardly get over. A. TJ. 



NORMAN & IDA TAYLOR. 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — Comedy. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — In one, special. 

The theme for the thinly threaded plot 
offered by "The .Traffic Cop and the 
Girl" is rather conventional, but well 
enough presented to make the turn a 
rather pleasing one. 

There are a few rough spots in the 
act that should be brushed np a bit, 
and some things that should be elimin- 
ated. One of them is the "chemise" bit, 
which has done great service in burlesque 
for a great many years back and is 
rather antiquated for vaudeville at 
present, besides being a bit suggestive. 

The parodies sung by' the man are 
very good and well rendered. The Anal 
song, which is sung with the back drop 
showing a view of the Times Square 
district, illuminated, is a very novel one, 
and the man doing the parody answer to 
the song, helped greatly to strengthen 
the finishing part of the turn. The turn 
should end at the conclusion of this 
number, and not as it does, at present, 
with a few needless dancing steps, for 
thev wear off the good impression previ- 
ously made by the act. A. TJ. 



HARRY KELLY AND CO. 

Theatre— Palace, State* Island. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting— Drawing room. 

Harry Kelly has an amusing farce en- 
titled "Hooray." Henry Clive, the 
author, is also a member of the cast 
The third member of the trio is Dore 
Ployden. 

The plot deals with Kelly's inability 
to play the piano, although he has led 
his sweetheart to believe that he bad a 
musical education in Paris, for she will 
marry none other than a great musician. 
To save the situation, the butler rents a 
handorgan and stands behind the screen 
while bis master "fakes" a selection on 
the piano. The playlet gets its title from 
the fact that the signal for the butler 
to start to play is "Hooray." But, when 
all the playing is through, and the girl, 
delighted at the talent of her bride- 
groom-to-be, displays a check for $50,000, 
a wedding gift from her uncle, Kelly 
again shouts "Hooray." The butler 
takes this as another signal and starts 
to play again, thereby queering the 
whole thing. 

Kelly is a scream throughout, and 
the acting of all is excellent H. S. P. 



WILLIAM FERRY 

Theatre— Royal 

Style — Contortionist. 

Setting — Special. 

Time — Ten minutes. 

The name of this novelty act is "The 

Fr SS" 
The setting represents a spot in the 

woods where there is a stream and a 

large tree stump. On this tree stump 

sits a frog (Ferry), who goes through 

all sorts of queer contortions. 

Ferry is an adept contortionist and 
has shown excellent showmanship in 
the way he has surrounded himself with 
picturesque settings, good lighting ef- 
fects and original ideas. 

The natural result is success, which 
was evidenced beyond donbt when, in 
the opening spot, he took seven hows 
on Monday night. H. G. 



WALSH SISTERS 

Theatre— Proctor's 125th Street. 

Style— Sister act. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — In two. 

The Walsh Sisters start with an off- 
stage duet. They then enter, dressed 
as two little girls and look very cute 
in their costumes. 

One of the girls sings a number of 
songs, all very much along the same 
lines, and the other one, who accom- 
panies her sister at the piano, plays a 
piano solo well. 

The girls are very pretty and have 
considerable talent Their turn could 
be made very successful by putting 
more variety into it. That is, the act 
is too monotonous and too long as it 
stands. While the music numbers are 
all pretty enough, one of them should be 
eliminated and replaced with a song con- 
taining a lot of dash and "pep." 

If the act can acquire speed, it will be 
a winner. H. G. 



ROY BRYANT & CO. 

Theatre — Prospect, Brooklyn. 
Style — Comedy sketch. 
Time — Thirteen minutes. 
Setting — Dining room. 

The title of this comedy sketch is 
"Preparedness." There are two persons 
in the cast, a man and his wife. 

It is a satire on the preparedness 
"fan," the man who talks, sleeps and 
eats preparedness. Then, when the real 
time for fighting comes, he seeks shelter, 
while his wife goes out to meet the 
enemy. 

The lines are funny and there Is much 
in the playlet to recommend it. 

Some months ago this reviewer saw 
Charles Rice and company in practically 
the same offering. H. G. 



prruo. 

Theatre — Prospect, Brooklyn. 

Style — Horizontal oar. 

Timer— Six minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

Pituo is a clown. He enters through 
the shutters on the window of a house, 
painted on the back drop, and then pro- 
ceeds to perform a number of feats on a 
horizontal hand bar. Between feats, he 
entertains with tricks and nonsense 
which particularly amuses the kiddies. 
At the end of his act be does some 
effective work on the bar, making his 
final exit by diving through one of the 
windows of the house. 

Pituo has a very acceptable act for 
an opener or a closer. H. G. 



HOLYOKE STREET RAILWAY CO.'S 

Mountain Park Casino 

Mountain Park, Holyoke, Mass. 

OPENS MONDAY, JUNE 18 

Being Booked Direct — Full Weeks — 2 Shows Daily — Only 
Standard Acts Wanted 



FRED J. SARR, Room 310, Putnam Bldg., N. Y. 



JOHNNY 



MARION 



JONES and GREENLEE 



"WHAT DID YOU DO?" 



Direction H. Bart McHuffa 



JIM 



BEATRICE 



MclNTYRE and WYNNE 

Comedy, Singing, Dancing in One 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



SPIEGEL and JONES 

IN A COLORED SPASM Written by OTTO T. JOHNSON 

FOUR MUSICAL KLEISES 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



We Invite all Sipjtinj Membra ol the Theitricit Prole. lion to Examine in Ai.ortrr.tnl of 

GREAT NEW UNPUBLISHED SONG NUMBERS 



rtefc KNICKERBOCKER HARMONYSTUDIOS' 



THE PARFAIT BLUES 

A Dollar** a Dollar, a DtmVa a Dim*, this ooVs tb» plaeav you'll uva It all tha tin* 

PARFAIT MODE SHOP 



l« W. 4Mb St, Suite 



A TrUl Wttl Convince YOU 
J. FE1CENBAUM * FELIX YOUNG, M|n. 
TtZ. N«w York 



Btiul 



J'-«- , i«-«-*«-*****«*«^**«^* , -"******«^**«***"*«^»«^"-* , i , -'-''-V 



CHICAGO CABARET STARS ; 



t V..^..Atiw.miw.'A-.v.nTOr 



ADAH SUMMERHILL ^ BEBE MclNTYRE 



{-BUSTER BROWN") 

Entre Nona— In Song Revues 



(ROSIE CGRADY) 

Winter Garden, Chicago 



MARIE LA MAR & ESTELLE WARD 

$1,000,000 Worth of Red Hair 

Two Raff and Nut Sundaes at Frlaberg's Hall— That's All 

1VI A DGE KEENER 

She Singeth Ballads to Multitudes and Hath a Host of Friends Who Liketb. Hor — 
Unanimously! . FRIEBERG'S HALL 



LILLIAN BERNARD 

Kansas City Favorite 
Conamas Cafe, CUof*. Indsf. 

TAKE THE CLIPPER 

Three months, $1.00 



CHARLES JORDAN 

SIXTH MONTH 

States CeJe Revue. Chios a 

ZOE NORVALL 

Ingenue with Winter Garden, Chicago 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. PAUL KEITH, Pmtot E. F. ALBEE, Vtaa-Pre*. * Cm. Ma*. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



JARION RYAN 



KATHRYN RAYMER 



ARION DUO 



The Singing Janitor 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDIE 



JULIA 



SWARTZ 



A1NTD 



CAN YOU BEER IT? 



CLIFFORD 



DIRECTION ARTHUR HORWITZ 



5 PANDURS 



Novelty Act in Vaudeville 



WORTHY 



FLORENCE 



DUFTY & DAISY 

Vaudeville'* Classiest Cycling Novelty. Direction Alf. T. Wilton 
Harlem Opera House, 2S-2S-JS; rvoct s ra lzsth, 31-June 1-2-3 



MAX HART PRESENTS "OH BRAZIL" 




Lights Club, Freeport, this Summer 



LE ROY and BERRY 

Singing, Dancing and Comedy, Novelty. In Vaudeville 



SAM LAURA 

AV I S A \A/ A L. K 

A Lesson in D-~-i"f—— Norman Jefferies 



THE 



MARTIANS 



In "THE ASTRONOMER'S 
DREAM OF MARS." 

Special Scenery. Everything Original 



RUSSELL, GREENE and JONES 

Singing — Acrobatic — Dancing 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

9D arid O 

IN 'THE JUGGLER'S DREAM" 

BOOKED SOUP. SAM BAERWTTZ. REP. 



Marcus Loew's Enterprises 

General Executive Offices 
Putnam Building, Time* Square, New York 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

General Booking Manager 



Mr. Scaenck Personally Interviews Artists Daily Between 11 and 1 



Chicago Office: North American Bulldtn* 
FRANK Q. DOYLE, in charge 



Beaten Office: Tremont Theatre Bulldlnc 
FRED MARDO. in char,. 



Acts laying off in Southern territory wire this office. 



C. H. HASKELL, Mgr. — IDA BUTLER— SAM GILLETTl HARMONY SINGING 

.mm- jh£ pive MARTELLS mi,mm 



ACT 



MANAGERS 



WEEH AWKEN, P. O., N. J. 



ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOWRY 



IN 



"Jests and Jigs" 

BY TOMMY CRAY 



THE WORLD WONDER DANCERS 

With "THE LOVE MILL" Vaudeville 



GERTIE EVADNE De MILT 

THE GIRL WITH THE SMILE— IN VAUDEVILLE 



THREE LADIES 



ONE MAN 



NOVELTY AERIAUSTS 



Direction MR. BORNHAUPT 



BERNARD 



ADELE C. 



WHEELER & POTTER 



In a Phoney Episode 



In Vaudeville 



JACK 



MATT 



CAMPBELL & MEEKER 



IVY and IVY smoRia^T stove 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



EVE LY 



N ELKIN 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOB & PEGGY VALENTINE 

"Vital Statistics"— A New Comedy Act in "One" 

- IN VAUDEVILLE 

Harry K. Morton g Zella Russell 

' THE LAUGH PROMOTERS 

VIRGINIA KELSY 

DOUBLE VOICE PRIMA DONNA 



HERBERT 



TRIXIE 



HOEY ^D SIVHTH 



COMEDY — SONG — DANCE 



Direction, JACK LEWIS 



HARRY KEENE & WILLIAMS KATIE 

A Real Comedy Act in One. Special Scenery 

NOW PLAYING 

Sammy — GOLD & SEAL — eu 

Those Champagne Boys in "BITS OF VARIETY" 

DIRECTION ROSE a CURTIS 

WHITEf a^GREEN g» * 



m VAUDEVILLE 



CASEY AGENCY 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



(Continued from Page 8) 



RIVIERA 

(Last Half) 

Frank Le Dent gave an excellent per- 
formance of juggling and his work was as 
enjoyable as it was adept It is far away 
from the monotonous routine furnished by 
some performers. All bis stunts were put 
over to a good response. 

Jack Kennedy and company provided 
twenty minutes of laughter with their com- 
edy sketch "Don't Do It." Kennedy, as 
the affable husband from whom his wife 
wants a divorce, plays the role with a 
spontaneity that gives pleasure. 

Brown, Harris and Brown kept up the 
comedy pace of the previous sketch. At 
least, the old man did. He is still put- 
ting across his old stammering stunt, his 
tongue getting in his way and providing 
innumerable laughs. They should open 
with a more up-to-date song, and if they 
would cut out the gags about tbe woman's 
age, tbe applause they get would be even 
bigger. As it is, the finish is flat. 

Tbe Three Hoy Sisters, lilliputians, 
were a cunning trio. They sang and danced 
acceptably and won the appreciation of 
the audience. 

Hoey and Lee, Yiddish parodists, were 
better liked for their political speeches than 
tbeir parodies. The speeches were fraught 
with laughs, but the parodies were bor- 
dering too near suggestiveness to meet with 
approval. 

Norton and Earl, in a singing and danc- 
ing act, were a good closer. Their dances 
included everything from the minuet of the 
eighteenth century down to modern dances. 
The woman exhibited a good voice and ber 
solo number was a pleasing rendition. 
However, she spoiled it by her costume, 
which consisted of a short jacket over 
tights, which certainly did not appeal to 
this audience. She could easily have gone 
over big in a modern dress. The man's 
enunciation was not at all clear. S. W. 



DELANCEY 
(Last Mat!) 

The bill at tbe Detancey for the latter 
half of last week was a loug one, inter- 
spersed with many pictures that cut the 
vaudeville program into a number of parts. 

Perhaps Brady and Mahoney and the 
Brians shared first honors on Thursday 
afternoon. Both turns will be reviewed 
under New Acts. Amanda Gray and Her 
Southern Boys will also be reviewed in 
the New Acts department. 

Josephine Lehnhardt, a cute little girl, 
with an abundance of curls, sang a reper- 
toire of five songs, putting them over most 
successfully. Her Scotch and war num- 
bers, and her Irish jig, were particularly 
well done. 

Seymore's Happy Family, which con- 
sists of a number of small dogs, gave little 
more than a passable performance. Com- 
pared with other dog acts, Seymore's pets 
do little in the line of tricks that can be 
stamped as unusual or particularly clever. 
The dogs only perform tbe simplest kind 
of feats. The dog drama, entitled, "The 
Villain at Lunch Time," was as original 
as anything attempted in the act and 
pleased. The turn is nicely staged. 

Marshall and Covant, working in black- 
face, sing, dance and talk. The pair have 
a very acceptable act. Their dancing is 
the most effective thing they do and they 
seem to realize this, for they do consider- 
able stepping very weU. Even though ap- 
pearing in blackface, they seem to give 
great care to their dress and look spic 
and span to a degree that deserves to be 
commended. 

Poster and Ferguson possess good sing- 
ing voices and pleasing personalities, and, 
consequently, find it easy to succeed with 
their man-and-girl act. Since the greater 
part of their talk is very original, they 
should refrain from the gag about "Nightie, 
nightie! Pajama, pajama!" 

With a playlet dealing with cold coffee 
and a mixup in wives, Hans Roberts and 
Company scored a laughing hit. The lines 
were well read and Roberts was tendered 
excellent support. H. 6. 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

Tbe show was opened by the Christies, a 
pair of exceptionally expert marimba play- 
ers. A number of selections, ranging from 
operatic to ragtime are all played well. 
Tbe patriotic march makes a dandy closer 
for the act. Friday night's audience 
seemed well pleased with the turn. 

The next three acts, embracing two 
man-and-girl teams, which both went over 
successfully, and a playlet, which was 
rather weak and scored less markedly, will 
be reviewed under "New Acts." They ap- 
peared in the following order : The 
Adamars, Maudie Scott and company, and 
Hunter and Bauer. 

The work of Jack La Vier is deserving 
of tbe warmest kind of praise. He com- 
bines some very difficult trapeze feats with 
a line of bright and incessant talk. Man- 
ager Swift has wisely put him in a feature 
spot, for his work is much too good to 
either open or close a show. This clever 
trapezist is a big timer of the first water 
and should be playing the largest houses. 
At times, particularly in the first few 
minutes of bis act, his lines sound slightly 
reminiscent of Edwin George. 

Cbapelle and Thibble have a rather en- 
tertaining dialogue, which elicits a number 
of laughs. The straight has a good singing 
voice that reminds one both of Eddie Leon- 
ard and Al. Jolson. His work would be 
more effective if he sang a little less ec- 
centrically. When the pair sing together, 
their voices blend poorly, the contrast 
being too striking. 

The "Follow Me Girls" act closed the 
show. The turn carries six chorus girls 
and three principals. One of the girls has 
an Hawaiian specialty song and dance, as- 
sisted by the chorus. This is the brightest 
spot in the act, for the girl shows excep- 
tional talent and was forced to respond to 
an encore on Friday night. Certainly, she 
possesses more ability than the girl who 
is a principal, the latter putting no par- 
ticular life or individuality into her song 
numbers. 

The guying of the English comedian, who 
is one of the silly ass type, fell in for big 
laughs. Several of the jokes, though, have 
been picked from the chestnut tree, which 
makes us speculate how much of the ma- 
terial is original. The gag about none of 
us being perfect and the joke about putting 
in the bark of a dog to make the riddle 
more difficult have been heard time and 
again. 

The chorus works hard and looks very 
attractive, particularly in their orange 
colored dresses. On tbe whole, the act 
meets with more success than the average 
turn of this style. H. G. 



PROCTOR'S 58th STREET 

(Last Half) 

The opening turn, "The Larneds," a 
comedy bicycle act, helped greatly to start 
things going. The stunts done with the 
trick wheels are very amusing. Still, too 
much attention is paid to the comedy ele- 
ment of the turn, which slows it up a bit. 
It is hardly necessary for a turn of this 
sort, with only three persons in it. The 
tramp comedian is sufficient for the turn, 
and if the other men were to do straight 
trick work, it would enhance the value of 
the offering. As the turn is at present 
constructed, it is fit for the opening spot 
in three-a-day houses. 

Abbott and Mills, Whipple and Huston 
and Glenn and Burns, in the second, third 
and fourth positions on the bill, respec- 
tively, are reviewed as "New Acts." 

Marshall Montgomery, assisted by Edna 
Courtnay, bad things all bis own way. 
His ventriloquist ic endeavors seemed to 
please, especially his reed whistling. Mont- 
gomery should, however, be sure that all 
the material used is his own. His "Car- 
negie Library" gag is used by another act. 

Allen and Francis, in the difficult posi- 
tion of having to follow Montgomery, had 
a hard road to travel and, finally, by their 
terpsichorean endeavors, managed to 
make a mighty good impression. The Five 
Kitamuras closed the show. A. TJ. 



WHY PAY HOTEL RATES? 



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Apartments consist of 4, 5 or 6 large, light, comfortable and airy rooms with bath. || 



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Telephony— IMl Aiidemy ■ • ., • 

Office- on Premise*- — Open from 8:30 A. M. to 10:00 P. M. 



NEW HOTEL WARMER 

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THE GAYETY 

Phila's Famous Burlesk Theatre 

JOHN F. WALSH. Prop. JOS. M. HOWARD. But. Mgr. 

Operating the Largest Burlesk Stock in America 

ALWAYS OPEN FOR PRODUCING COMEDIANS 

Owners in Search of "Finds" Pay Us a Visit 



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CHAS. H. WALDRON 



Waldron's Casino, Boston, Mass. 



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JOS. T. WELSMAN, Proprietor. 



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Union Help (Member N. V. A. and Burlesque Club) Best Bet en tbe Circuit 



BEN 



BURLESQUE OFFERS INVITED 



LEONA 



AND 



Author, Producer, Comedian Double Voiced Prima Donna 

(Formerly with Max Spiegel and Bob Manchester Shows) 

213 W. Uttb St. New York Phone MorniogsUU S2M 



Wanted for Next Season 

Chorus Ladles for 
THE BEEF TRUST 

Also Small Gin* for the 
UNITED STATES BEAUTIES 

Also want good feature acts, and people In all 
lines of Burlesque. Adores* BILLY WATBOsT. 
Orphsom Theatre, Patsrson, H. J. 



KLINE & WOOD 

SCENIC STUDIO 

408 GATES AVENUE, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



phiiip AUSTIN&BAILEY l~ 



IN "A SYNCOPATED HOTEL" 



DIRECTION PETE MACK 



MARY L.MAXFIELD 

Little Miss Personality 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



A HOLIDAY IN DIXIELAND 

lO PEOPLE lO 

WITH 

Will MASTLN and Virgle RICHARDS 

1. a CreU-ie Bar,. - Mir*. BW* -4 Djjoc*^ ^^ ^ ^^ 



BENTELL BROS. 

Acrobatic Dancers 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



PLAYING U. B. O. 



STONE & LE SOIR 

PRESENTING 

12 ROYAL TROUBADOURS 

Singers and Instrumentalists 

DInctlaa-LEE MUCKENFUSS 



Mark Levy Presents 

STANLEY and BURNS 

Two Jolly Bachelors Booked Solid 



JAS. EL 



ED. F. 



WORLD & PEAT 

SINGING, DANCING AND COMEDY IN VAUDEVILLE 



WILLIE 



JAMES 



IN AMATEUR NIGHT 

THOSE TWO BOYS IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOOKED SOLID 



ZITA LYONS 

"Venus of the Show World" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



MYRTLE BOLAND 



Direction HARRY SHEA 



AND HER 

JAZZ 
BAND 



MAY 



RAE 



LARINE and CRAWFORD 

In Piano, Violin and Songs 

VAUDEVILLE 



4 Ft. 8 

of Ragtime 

In Win. a FrWIanAar'a Inc. "Tkm Saffrmcetce Raroa. 
Under Personal Manacement BART. H. McHUGH 



SAM 



GARLAND 



GAINES & HOWARD 

IN THE BOSS'S CLOTHES-^SEEN 'EM YET? 
IN VAUDEVILLE 

HELENE VINCENT 

IN VAUDEVILLE ' 

LINTON and WATSON 

Comedy TaDdar Act, Ennaed 

««Sl-ie Auto Know" 

joiimie KENNY and LaFRANCE « ra " 

PREMIER DANCERS Direction TOM JONES 

— COLLINS & WEST— « 

In a Comedy Slot, "The Book Agent" Direction, WENONAH TENNEY 



THE GIRL, FROM 
BRIGHTON 

ENCHANTRESS OF RAGTIME ALLEY. 



KITTY FLYNN 



BOOKED SOLID 



ANNA MARIE 



DAINTY COMEDIENNE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



FANNIE BQJJE 

KEELER — BELMONT 

•TAKING CHANCES." Direction MARK LEVY 

SKATING VENUSES 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction HARRY WEBER 



IL. 

Upside Down Comedians 



DIRECTION WENONAH M. TENNEY 



FRANKIE FAY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



O'BRIEN & KING 

(Formerly O'Brien A Egmmnr) 
In THE NEW PIANO PLAYER 



HENRY LOWY & LACEY SISTERS 



ECCENTRICITIES IN SONGS AND DANCES 



JOSEPHINE LENHART 

The Diminutive Songster m vaudeville 

"earyTeary" 



WHIRLWIND NOVELTY GYMNASTS 



NEW TO THE EAST 



& HARRIS 



The Diminutive Pair, Present "In the Hallway" 

A NOVELTY SKIT IN ONE 



TANEAN BROTHERS £ 



Week 28, 
ORPHEUM, DETROIT 



IWeeklJune'4,p 
MILES, CLEVELAND 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



Cfij»j», 





la order to avoid pIMjfcM and to insure the prompt delivery of the letters advo itla od 
in ♦*■** list, a POSTAL CARD mint be- asat reejueetfana- ua to forward roar letter. It mail 
be signed with your full name and the address to which the letter ia to be seat, and the 
Use of business followed by the sender should be m e t i H on ed. 

Please mention the date (or number) of the CLIPPER in which the Utters sent for 
were advertised. 



GENTLEMEN 



Adasis. Win. 
Atkinson, John 

k White 

■a 

—>■ &_X- 

Bassttt. BiasrU 
Bartlett. Jis. A. 
Bcrtrand, Fran* 
Brewer, Too L. 
Bobs. Tit 3 
Constanzo. M. 
Chapman. Harry 
Crow, Cos*. 
Corolla. Pmol 
Colwell. Ju. M. 



Atlantii. Isabel 
Bennett. Victoria 
Bart. Mrs. 
Cornel). Grset 
Ojfton. Dorothy 
Cooper, Man* 
Ornrlls. Viol* 



Clark a Conklln 

Stowi 
De Voe. Ed 
Delmslne, Frank 
Druek. 8*1 
De tiara a Danle 
Dixie, Henry 
Daroy, Arthur 

Elliott, KU C. 

Elan, Hsrrj 
Fey. Norman 
Folry k Lsigr* 
Foster. Eddie 
Freytr, Etrle 
Ferris. Esrry 
Fenri. Jot. L. 



Csllff, Jennie 
Denier, Jolan 
Dixon, Belle 
Dsrley, Flo 
Din*. Katharine 
Dee VaL Olynsls 
Fulton. Sale 



Fiiedls&oer, Wm. 

B. 
(Irty, Andrew J. 
Grey, Bee Ho 
Graham. Frank N. 
Crtffln PotUshlns 

Co. 
Cretoe, WDJ a 

Ms 
Geonl* Comedy 4 
Georie. Al 
Beelos, Qua 
Howard, Gnat 
Harney, Ben 
Ball, EUnvortn 

a Merries 



Howard It Boris 

Hammond, Begs 
P. 



Pitt 

Hutchinson, Chaa 
Klnt. Tnoa J. 
Kennedy, Con T 

Shan 
Lyle. Oell W. 
Ljl( e Harris 
Lewi*. Jses 
letter, T. 
Loekle * Tost 
Le Boy. Edw. 
Lester, Tim 



LADIES 



Gibson, Use 

Gillespie. Mrs. 

Holland, Mtr- 
S*ret 

HU1. sbl. La- 
fayette 

Justice. Jessie 



Joonut, Berlin 
Johnart, Brtajet 
Klncsley. Ansa 
Kramer. Ells 
Lelsbton, Bnta 
L* SaUe. Bshe 
Hasten, Mae 



Lawrence, Daly 
k Lawrence 

Lsrery, Frank 

MeredUh, 0. A. 

Mason. John W. 
a. 

Majestic Amuse. 
Co. 

sterner. E. J. 

Newsll a Prior 

CDaj. Wm. 

Primrose, Ted 

Powers, Francis 

Perry, Joe 

Psnl. W. 

Bossksm, Chat. 



Mind, Martorie 
Page. Mildred 
Pnraell, Kathryn 
Penney, Mrs. E. 
Benrpel, Bessie a 

Harriett 
Roberts. Edna 



Roberta. C Bob 
Boy. Walter 8. 
Buffln, Gordon 
Sport* In the 

alp* 
Sinks, J. A. 
Stanley a Gold 
Tomer, Wm. H. 
Thompson. E. 7. 
TraTers. Burt 
Toy. Ben 
Turner, B. H. 
White, Will L. 
wiDthrop. Lew 
Ward a Van 
Watson, H. 



Smalley, Lillian 
SUiers. Ann* 
Thomas, Mia 

Bobble 
Wylde. Hue! 



PLAYERS ENGAGED 



Mary Boland. Felix Krembs, H. E. Her- 
bert, Reginald Mason. Cecil Yapp, Blanche 
Tnrka, Catherine Tower, Harry Hanlon 
and Charles Esdale by Selwyn & Co. for 
"Daybreak." 



Horace Sinclair and Arthur Geary by 
the Shuberts for "The Beautiful Un- 
known." 



Doris IJoyd, Gus Minton, Peggy Hop- 
kins and Yvonne Chappelle by Flo Zieg- 
feld for the "Ziegfeld Follies." 

Ernest Torrence by Arthur Hammer- 
stein for "Furs and Frills." 



Johnny Dooley and Xvette Rugel by the 
Shuberts for three years. 



Charles Knowlden by Elliott. Comstock 
ft Gest for "Oh. Boy!" 



Adelaide O'Connor, by the Shuberts. for 
"The Inner Man." 



DEATHS OF THE WEEK 






EDWARD DE RESZKE. the renowned 
bass singer, died last week In Erletrlkov, 
Poland. He was born December 23. 1855. 
in Warsaw, and obtained most or his vocal 
instruction from his brother Jean. He made 
his operatic debut as the King In Alda 
at the Theatre dea Italiens. Paris, on the 
occasion of this opera's first production In 
the French capital. He made his New York 
debut December 14. 1891. In "Romeo et Ju- 
liette" at the Metropolitan Opera House, 
tinder the direction of Abbey, Schoerfel & 
Grau and continued as a member or the 
eompanv at that house until April 28, 1903, 
on which date, on a "misted bill," he sans 
with Alvarez and Emma Games in the final 
scene of "Faust." His New Tork farewell 
occurred on May 31 of the same year, at 
Madison Square Garden when he sang the 
serenade from Berlioz's "Damnation of 
Faust" and Tschatkowsky's "Serenade of 
Don Juan" at a concert given by John 
Dusa. The deceased was considered among 
the greatest bassos the world ever saw. He 
and his brother were acclaimed as the two 
most famous brothers singing In Grand 
Opera. Their sister Josephine was also 
well known to the opera stage. 

WM. Q. SAMMIS died May 27 In London. 
Erg., after an Illness of seven days, from 
pneumonia. Mr. Sammls was a nephew 
of F. B. Conway, who, with his wife, was 
a famous star of the old Park Theatre 
stock company. In Brooklyn, N. T., and 
served as treasurer at that house for many 
years under the management of the late 
Col. Wm. E. Sinn. Later he was treasurer 
of the Columbia Theatre, that city, under 
Edwin Knowles management. Sammis 
went to England twenty-one years ago for 
the Smith Premier Typewriter Company 
and represented that concern there up to 
the time of his death. He leaves a widow, 
two children and a brother. Leslie Sammls. 
The remains were Interred May 29. 

HERBERT DANSEY, who In private life 
was Count Berto Danyell Tasslnari, died 
suddenly May 29 at the Polyclinic Hospital. 
New Tork. The deceased was born March 
6. 1870, in Rome. Italy, and was a pupil 
at the Scuola dl Recltaztone In Florence 
under Tommaso Salvinl, Ernesto Rossi and 
Lulgi Rasl. He made his stage debut In 
London in "The Importance of Being Earn- 
est." He came to this country a few years 
ago and in 1913 appeared in "Fanny's First 
Pay." More recently he was identified 
with motion pictures, having appeared in 
screen productions of the Frohman Amuse- 
ment Co. 



WM. E. COSTELLO, formerly manager 
of the Lyceum Theatre, In Albany. N. T.. 
and builder of the Beman Park Theatre In 
Troy, died June 2 at his home, in the latter 
city, from pneumonia. The deceased was 
a charter member of the Theatrical Me- 
chanics' Association. For the last few 
years Costello and his brother had con- 
ducted a restaurant in Albany. 

MARIE UART. In private life Mrs. Mary 
Phllbrlck. died last Friday at the Milton 
Hospital. Boston, Mass. She made her 
stage debut when sixteen years of age as 
a member of the old Boston Museum stock 
company. After she left that house she 
played with many of the stars of the day. 
Including Edwin Booth, Frank Mayo, Jo- 
seph Jefferson and Lotta. Later she ap- 
peared In the productions of Charles Hovt. 
and more recently was with John Drew. 
She leaves a son. Wm. H., and a daughter. 
Charlotte, who are on the stage. Another 
son. Francis J., Is a business man In Boston. 

EDWARD D. FISK, at one time well 
known as a stock manager, died May 23 
in the Protestant Hospital, Columbus, O., 
from heart disease. He was fifty-three 
years of age and entered the theatrical 
business In the early '80s" as manager of 
Newton Beers' "Lost In London" Co. Af- 
terwards he was manager for James R. 
Walte for several years, and then manager 
of his own Fisk and Stock Theatre Co. 
Latterly he devoted himself to commercial 
business. He was married twice and died 
wlthous issue. 

HARRY A. STARR died April 15 at 
Brantford, Canada, from typhoid fever. 
The deceased was a well known stock actor 
and for three years was a member of the 
stock company at the Avenue Theatre, De- 
troit, Mich. His last engagement was with 
the Kelly Bros. Stock Co. at Lansing. Mich. 
His wife and daughter survive him. 

GEORGE SMALL, seventeen years old. 
an actor living In the Bronx, was drowned 
Sunday. May 27, In the North River, off 
Dyckman Street, when the boat In which 
he and two men were taking a ride, upset. 
The two men were saved. 

CATHERINE ROWE PALMER, a vaude- 
ville dancer, died In her home last week 
after an Illness of two months. Funeral 
services -were held In an undertaking estab- 
lishment and the body was taken to Phila- 
delphia, Miss Palmer's former home 

L, D. MclNTOSH, a theatrical agent of 
Chicago, was found dead in his room at 
the Jefferson Hotel. Death was due to 
heart trouble. 



AGENTS 

GET THE LATEST 

Make Big Money Selling 

Photo - Handled Knrraa 

for Punch Board* 

KnlTes made with the latest real 
ART. SEPTEMBER MORN. JESS 
WILLABD and OTHER ATTRACT- 
IVE) DESIGNS. We want agents Id 
every city and town. We manufac- 
ture our own knlre* end. therefor*. 
we are not dependent on forwipo 
supplies. All shipments can be nisilr 
promptly. WI ABB TBB largest 
MANCT-ACTDBEBS AND HIS 
TRIBCTORS OF PHOTO-HANDLED 
KNIVES FOR PUNCH BOARDS 
AND E4PFLB CARDS IN THE 
UNITED STATES. Writ* ua and 
we will see that you are promptly 
supplied. Ask for catalogue sod 
terms today. 

GOLDEN RULE CUTLERY CO. 

212 No. Sheldon St. Sept. It. Cnioage 



Jack Housh 

•sU-wal 

Kathryn LaVelle 

in 

WHEN THE WORM TURNS 



Western R e p r es en tative WAYNE CHRISTY 
Eastern Representative PETE MACK 



Who*, the First N. V. A. Widow? MEI 



CHARLES 




and 



IRENE 






SHAW 

NOW IN VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION BILLY ATWELL 



MERCEDES 



ALVIN and 

ANDY 

WILLIAMS 

Sailing from Vancouver June 6th, 
Aboard the Niagara for 

Australia 
RICKARD'S CIRCUIT 



BOB FINLAY 

and DOROTHY 

Offering 

" A Bit 0' This and That" 

N- V. A. 

DIRECTION PETE MACK 



SLA YM AN AU 

■: Producer ol tt 

0R1EVTA1 NOVELTIES 

7S4 I to Avst, New York 
Phone Bryant S9SO 



B. r. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway A «th St. 

Mat. DallT at 2 P. M. 

28, SO and TOe. 

■tarj Nlfbt 

28-S0-T5-»l-*l.30. 



JULIA ARTHUR, 0OM- 
ROY * J-E lfAtRZ, 
JTOREUCE MOORS a 
BSO. FRANK MOORE, 
"THX FOREST FIRE." 
HARE Y CARROLL, 
MTLO. 8BAW * SEA- 
BURY. MEEHAN'8 DOQB 



West MM St 
Bra. at 8.20. 



. 1'booe Bryant 40. 
Mate. Wed. & Sat. 



CORT 

10th CROWDED MONTH 

UPSTAIRS b DOWN 

BY FREDERIC AND TAHHT HATTON 



M0R0SC0 



THEATRE, 43th St. West 
or Broadway. Eva. 8:£0. 
Usts. Wed. A Sat. 2:20. 
Oliver Monseo presents the laughing sensattoa 

THE BRAT 

By MAUDE FULTON 
"Better than 'Par 0' My Heart' "—EVE. 80 H. 



GAIETY 



THEATRE. B'wsy A 4oth 
St. Eves, tt 8,20. Mats 
Wed. A Set. st 2.20. 
WTxYCHZLL SMITH and JOHN L. QOLDXsT 
Pr ese n t the season's success 

TURN TO THE RIGHT 



REPUBLIC 



THEATRE, W. 42nd 8t. 
HTi-nlnas at 8.20. Matinees 
Wednesday A Saturday 2.20. 
Messrs. Shnbert present 
a dramatisation of George dn Manrler'e nOTfl 

PETER IBBETS0N 

WITH JOHN BARBYM0RE, CONSTANCE COL- 
LIER. LAURA HOPE OBZWS, LIONEL 

BAHRYM0RE. 



PETE MACK 

Artttttf Representative, 

Can handle a limited number of 
high class attractions 



Palace Theatre Bldg. 

Phone Bryant 3710 



PEP COMEDIANS 

THEODORE BILLY 

PANKEY McCARVER 

THE DEVIL AND THE 
WHITEWASH MAN 

Singing, Dancing and Talking 



ED 



LORD and 

MAZIE 

FULLER 

Vaudeville 

Direcrinn BILL GRADY 

CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus, Rolling Globes. Clubs, Batons, 
Guns, Wire Walkers' Apparatus and Nowelsiea. 
Stamp for catalog. ETJW. VAN WYCK, 
Cincinnati, O. 

WHITE RAT TRANSFER CO., Inc. 

EXrlEtS sad tACCACE. assess* f tans* at Law ssua. 
147 Wast 37th Street, Nstw York 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



BUD WALKER 



The Versatile Boy 



MoJULfcri take notice 



(or next — 1 Decs everything but x Back Flip. 
SEE JACK McGANN 



ED. F. REYNARD Presents 
MLLE, 


MLLE. BIANCA Present* 
ED. F. 


Bl ANC A 


REYNARD 


In a Series of Dramatic 
Dance Poems. 


The Ventriloquial Comedian, 
in "BEFORE THE COURT." 



The Nelson Trio 

BANJOS AND XYLOPHONE 

HIGH-CLASS MUSICAL ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



DENA 



THORNTON 



CARYLL & FLYNN 

Prima Donna and Irish Tenor 

IN VARIED OFFERING OF MELODY IN VAUDEVILLE 



WHITE BROS 

Tile Tip-Top Boys 

Direction Lew Golder 



GILMORE & LeMOYNE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DANCING VIOLINIST 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



Beatrice McKenzie 

in a Singing Novelty Assisted by RAY E DUNN 

Direction FRANK EVANS 



EDDIE MAHGIE BILLY 

DeLite.StewartpHardy 



20th Century Trie m Sons, Dance and Palter 



Rap-. Tom Jones 



ADELAIDE CONLEY 

REFINED SINGING 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDE 



DOLLY 



DOLLY & LEWIN 



IN A 



School, Fool and a Flirt 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



DIKE 



LEWIS 



THOMAS & CRADDOCK 



Singing, Talking and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



JAS. B. 



STANFORD 



ROBINSON and McKISSICK 



DIRECTION MAX OBENDORF 



THERESA L. MARTIN 



In Vaudeville 

N. V. A. 



Featuring Hawaiian String Quartet 

BIRLINGTON FOUR 



In "Hokcmvllle" 

PERSONAL DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 




Assisted by FLOR D'AUZA 

Pi willing Their Wonderful Roosters 
Chas. Bornhaopt Keeps Them Crowing. 



JACK M. SYDNEY 

Versatile Entertainer Singing and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE . 



BILLY 



BETTY 



KIMBALL and KENNETH 

Noveliy.Banjo Entertainers. Originators of Hawaiian Sled Banjo, 

Playing Loew Time Direction Mark Levy 



ELEANOR FISHER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 




BILLY NEWELL i ELSA MOST 



With MENLO MOORE 



W. V. M. A. 



U. B. O. 



ADA 



PAUUNE 



Billsbury and Robison 

Comedy, Singing, Talking and Dancing N. V. A. Direction Frank Evans 



LEW SHARP 



RUBE GOLDIE 



51'MERRY YOUNGSTERS 

Fun — Fast and Furious 

HARRY GOOD MAN JOHN GREEN MACK COLEMAN 

DUXCnoN LEE KUCaXKFUSS June +-«, Bridgeport, Conn.; 7- J Waterbtvy. Conn. 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



Jos. W. Stern & Co. 

announce an exclusive publish- 
ing arrangement with 

William B. 

friedlander 

author and composer of many 
successful musical reviews and 
songs, including all of the num- 
bers featured by 

Nan Halperin 

comprising 

"Play My Wedding March In 
Ragtime" 

"The Youngest of the Family" 

"I'd Rather Be a Bridesmaid 
Than a Bride " 

AND OTHERS 
as well as 

"Oh, You Wonderful Girl" 

the musical hit of Mr. Friedland- 
er's pretentious vaudeville pro- 
duction 

"THE FOUR HUSBANDS" 

Among the first of Mr. Fried- 
lander's works offered the pro- 
fession will be a carefully se- 
lected list of 

SONG NOVELTIES 



WATCH FOR 

FURTHER 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Owing to the fact that, despite 
many alluring propositions from 
publishers, Mr. Friedlander has 
hitherto preferred to reserve his 
material for special use, we are 
particularly gratified to be en- 
abled, by this exclusive arrange- 
ment, to offer to the profession 
the splendid and original works 
of this talented writer. 



Jos. W. Stern & Co. 

Prof. DepL 

1556 BROADWAY, N. Y. 

L. WOLFE GILBERT, Prof Hiutor 

Home Office 

102-104 W. 38th Street 

Chicago San Francisco 

119 S. Clark St. Ill Kearny St. 



CINCINNATI 

Irene O'JIeara, one of the most popular 
soubrettes of the Colombia burlesque wheel 
is spending the summer at her home here. 



Manager I. Libson of the Strand Thea- 
tre, Walnut street, has renewed his lease 
for ten years at an annual rental of 
$25,000. 



Maurie Wolfson, manager of the Chester 
Park Opera House, is busy studying Span- 
ish. He is planning to go to Havana after 
the war to manage an amusement enter- 
prise in which bis uncle, Col. Ike Martin, 
is interested. 



The T. M. A. boys are in their new club 
rooms at 20 Opera Place. All the im- 
provements will be finished by July 1, ac- 
cording to Ed. Hollenkamp, secretary. The 
association has taken a five-year lease on 
tbe building and hopes, at the end of that 
time, to buy tbe structure and have its 
own borne. 



Cincinnati's historic Gift's fire engine 
house. Sixth street, near Vine, is to be con- 
verted into a motion picture theatre. The 
Greater Amusement Company, L W. Me- 
Mnhon, president, has taken a five-year 
lease, and will make $40,000 worth of im- 
provement. McMahon & Jackson will man- 
age the house. 



' "CALIFORNIA BELLES" IN REGIN A 

Regina, Can., June 2. — Ralston and 
Wolfe's "California Belles" company open- 
ed a permanent engagement in musical com- 
edy tabloid Monday at the Regina Theatre. 
They took over practically the whole of 
Charles F. Smith's "Musical Girls" who 
were permanent at the Strand, Saskatoon, 
during the early Spring. Tbe company now 
includes E. R. Ralston, J. Hollis, James 
P. Murphy, Buster Edwards, Anice Bru- 
neau. Gladice Clyford, Doris Clyford, Bir- 
tie Brownius. Myrtle Van Buskirk, Babe 
Allen, Marie Wolfe. Lola Ward. Rose Bour- 
assa, Clarice Groves. Rene La Verne. Anna 
Bell and Dot Hughes. 



JACK L. FORCUM MARRIES 

CrsciNKATi. June 2. — Jack Le Elmore 
Forcum. known under the professional de- 
signation of "The Crow." was married re- 
cently to Miss Bobby Robinson, of Mil- 
waukee. Mr. Forcum's new play. "The 
Yellow Sin."' will be produced by his man- 
ager, J. Warren Smith, in the early 
Antnmn. 



WOODS WINS ONGLEY SUIT 

Justice Xewburger. in the Supreme Court 
last Thursday, dismissed the complaint of 
Mrs. Amy Ongley, widow of Byron Ong- 
ley, against A. H. Woods and Max Marcin. 
In her complaint, Mrs. Ongley asked for 
an injunction, an accounting and damages 
for the production of "Cheating Cheaters." 

MME. SYLVA COMING HERE 

Marguerite Sylva, who has been abroad 
for several years, is en route to America to 
sing in concert and opera and act for the 
movies. Mme. Sylva- recently sang at the 
Grand Opera House in Paris. 



BELASCO NAMES CLAIRE PLAY 
"Polly With a Past" is the title of the 
play by Guy Bolton and George Middleton 
in which Ina Claire is to star under the 
direction of David Belasco. and for which 
rehearsals are now in progress. 



TWO "PARADISE" COS' TO TOUR 

Next season there will be two companies 
of "The Bird of Paradise" on the road. 
This will be the first time in its six years' 
career that more than one company of the 
play will be shown. 



GADSKI RENTS SUMMER HOME 

Mme. Gadski has rented a cottage for 
the season in the White Mountains at 
Pine Grove Springs, Lake Spofford, N. H. 



INSURE YOUR MATERIAL AGAINST THEFT 



ELKS CHOOSE THE MONTAUK 

The Brooklyn Elks will hold their annual 
Flag Day exercises on June 14 at the Mon- 
tauk Theatre. 



REGISTER YOUR ACT 



SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 

THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached and a certificate will be returned to you as 
an acknowledgment, and for future reference. The contribution should be signed plainly by the 
person or firm sending the same, and should be endorsed by the stage manager of the show or 
of the house where the act is being used or other witnesses. Further acknowledgment will be 
made by the names and numbers being published. 

Address your contributions to 

The Registry Bureau, 

NEW YORK CLIPPER, MM Broadway, New York 



Date 

NEW YORK CLIPPER REGISTRY BUREAU: 
Enclosed please find copy of my 

entitled 

for Registration. 

NAME 

Address 



When you register a play or scenario that you intend to submit for reading to any producer. 
"II furnish a label to be attached to the original, showing that the same has been entered 



we wi.- 

in THE CLIPPER Registry Bureau. Get the idea? 



FERKONS DETECTIVE AGENCY H*rr> W. Karroo. fV.oc 

thorized l>y State. Bonded. P«*r*on»l to 1 Ih--v[ik.i| Profe-aiioi 
Criminal Investigations confidentially conducted. Phone, Day 
Bryant. Fitzgerald BId K ., 14S2 Broadway. New York' City. 




BOB'S MOTOR EXPRESS 

NEW YORK HARLEM BROOKLYN 

Storage for Trunks Reference. All Headllners 

IS West 4(th St., New York 
(Bar. B'wsy and 6th Ats.) Phono Bryant «Ss* 

VV-rVf. CHARLES s_. EVANS 

DRUM SHOP 

EsTska FsMlta Mai. 

WO EUT 84ts IT., 



inr run. 



Telephone ISU Bryant 

TRUNKS REPAIRED 5K? 

3*t Weat 4Ut St, Comer sth Ave. 

Formerly with Quick service 

Taylor Trunk Works Returned in 24 hours 

Manicuring, Hair Dressing, Scalp Treatment, Shaaa- 

poolng. Toilet Preparations, Boudoir Noreltles. 

"LA HARSH" SHOP 

1482 Broadway, Boom 701 (O a. m. to 6 p. m.) 

Special attention gisen members of 

Phone Bryant 2297 Theatrical Prsfesaasa 



RWORLO FAHOUS a*** 
LD1NG ORGANS 
• EST or>i SAI_e swassff 



Bal's Dreadnaught 





sets- — - $10.0? _ 

a 1 LHORN BROS. M *» a fn 5? 

WANTED 

First Class Male Piano Player 

Who can play responsible parts. Must be able 
to read and transpose. Send photos. KJBBEE- 
GOSSETTE CO. THEATRE, Pratt, Kumi, 
June 4-5-6. 

^SSS&DlAMifrJDS* 




Rellabse Prolesslonal 
FRANCIS X. HENNESSY 

Irish Piper — Scotch Piper— Irish ■ 
i err— Scotch ning Dancer— nolimet (afa- 
tslelan)— teacher— Play Parts Arams ksss 
• this sddress: 322 Street An.. Ms Tent, 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

M inch $173* IM inch 

S inch list 31 Inch 2US 

34 inch lt.eo w inch IMS 

42 inch Cue 

WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

1 45 W. 45 th St., N.Y. 4 W. 22d St., N.Y. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mall Orders Filled Sean Day Ra tal s s d 

IS Deposit Required 

PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

Front Liberty St, 7 A. M. to If F. st- 
and at Midnight with Sis spars 
U MINUTES OF THE HOUR 
From W. ad St. 
YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY. E. P., Agassi 

144* BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Moving Picture 
Camera 

We manufacture them and 
make them ap to date, fat 
CTery way, for a reasonable 
price. Catalogue cheerfully 
furnished. Dealer In supplies. 
X. Estz. Mg Z. nrd It. 
Row York. 




26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



JOHNNY 



MATT1E 



MACKand 



N. V. A. 



Milk and Melody 

Direction IRVING SHANNON 



In Vaudevillo 



HERBERT 



LEW 



PIANO AND SONG COMEDY 



BOOKED SOLID 



Five Borsinis 

Novel Comedy Revolving Globe Spectacle 
BIG TIME ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



RUTH and BOB 

CHRISTIES 



The Musical Act With a Punch 

JACK FLYNN. REPRESENTATIVE 




NAMLOH and NEB 

In * Scenic Production 

-A WYVERN'S DEN" 

Loew Time Direction Sam Baerwitx 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

M ME DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Direction STOKER * BIERBAUER 



HARRY PEASE 

II V A Question— Why ia he always working? Quc.tion— Who is his representative? 

H.V.A. Answar— Because he's cat THE material. Answer— NAT SO BEL. 



The American 
Entertainer" 



BILLIE ARGYLE JOE FENN 

THE ALL AMERICAN FOUR 

HARMONY SINGING 

HARRY FENN H. P. FORSYTHE 



aJIfefMIE 



WILLIE 



MARSHALL <& COVAN 

Ttic Dancing Masters Direct from the west 

NOW PLAYING THE LOEW TIME 

HARRY SHEA. Eastern Director NED NESTOR, Western Director 



JACK 



NELLIE 



ORBEN and DIXIE 

In Southern Songs and Dances 

Playing Loew Circuit Address Care Clipper 



PHYLLIS 



EUGENE 



CURWOOD and GORMAN 

Before the Honeymoon and After 

Br HERMAN KAHN 

Cu»j*y rljrntwti 




Direction HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 

AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 

U. B. O— BIG TIME 



EDNA WINSTON TRIO 

NOW PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 



DIRECTION CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



GALLARINI & SON 

Featuring the Boy Accordionist and Instrumentalist 

Now Being- Featured on the U. B. O. Time 
DIRECTION— ALF T. WILTON 



THE NOVELTY FOUR 

Slim, Elmer, Cy and Heinie send a Hello to their friends. 

DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



In Their Latest Comedy Success 



Nearly a Jockey 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



FRANCIS 



FRANK 



WOOD and WARNOCK 

Novelty Act — In Vaudeville 



Olive Or 



The Kentucky Girl 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



FRANCES CORNELL 

"A FASHIONPLATE IN SONGLAND" 

Exclusive Material In Vaudeville 



ROBERTS 



CLINTON 



WILLIAMS & TAYLOR 

Singing, Dancing and Talking 

04 VAUDEVILLE 



ORIGINAL 



COLONIAL TRIO 



MAUD KELLY 

Harpist 



Featuring 

MARTIN KEARY 

Tenor 
DIRECTION JACK SHEA 



KATHRIN HULLING 

Soprano 



Ray Lynch 



A BIG SURPRISE 



Arthur Clay 



FOUR AMERICAN BEAUTIES 

Fred Slater «*••*•■ «f wenonah m. tenney Lew Price 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



U. B. O. 

IIV YORK UiXXi 
Palace— Nora Bares — White and Halg — Tempest 
and Sunshine — Bert Levy — Rockwell and Wood — 
Walter Brower— California Boys' Band. (Two to 

Boyal— Stone A Ksllz — Robin — Nella Alien — 
Louis Mann & Co. — Denny A Browning— Orr * 
Bager. 

Riverside — Emma Stevens — Henry Lewis — Tra- 
rllla Bros. A Seal— Primrose Four— Sterling * 
Marguerite. 

BROOKLYN. 

Boxhwiok — Belle Baker — Lee Kohlmer — Van A 
Schenck— "Mr. Inquisitive" — Wnt. Perry — The 
Gladiators — Jos. L. Browolag. 

Henderson — Heras ft Preston — Bert Hanlon — 
Ben Deeley ft Co. — Conley ft Webb — "Tango 
Shoes" — Herman A Shirley — Fay. Two Coleya A 
Fay — Chinese Duo — Francis A Boss — Hunt 4 De 
Mandy. 

Hew Brighton— Cooper & Rlcardo— Scarploff A 
Vavara — Bale ft Peterson — Nan Halperto — Mr. A 
Mrs. Jimmle Barry— Jack Alfred & Co. 
BUFFALO, M. Y. 

Shea's — Joyce, West ft Senna — Cross ft Josephine 
— Margaret Farrell. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Keith's— Marie A William Cutty— Gaylord ft 
Langton — Leo Beers — Florence Moore A Bro. — The 
Sbsrrocks — Edna Munsey — "Bride Shop" — Duffy A 
Datsy. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Temple — Nat M. Wills — The Kramers — Adelaide 
Bootbby A Co. — Nonette — Jones A Sylvester — Mr. 
A Mrs. Kelso — Bee Ho Gray A Co. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Eleotrio Park— Dooley A Nelson— Jones A Syl- 
vester — Bennett A Richards — Farber Girls— Jonla 
A Hawailans. 

NORFOLK, VA. 

Academy (First Half)— "Vanity Fair." (Last 
Half)— Britt Wood— A. A G. Falls— "Girl With 
the 1,000 Eyes" — Regal A Mack. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Keith's— DabI ft allien— "Bubevllle"— Misses 
Campbell — Dlgby, Bell A Co. — Arnaut Bros. — 
Roooey A Bent — Andy Bice — Kramer A Morton. 

RICHMOND, VA. 
Keith's (First' Half)— Britt Wood— "Girl With 
1.000 Eyes" — A. A G. Falls— Regal A Mack. (Last 
Half)— "Vanity Fair." 

WASHINGTON, S. O. 

Keith's— Dorothy Jardon — "For Pity's Bake" — 
Bert Bnker A Co. — Watson Sisters — Holmes A 
Buchanan — The Gaudsmldts — Loney Haskell — 
Laurie A Branson. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Kajestlo — Elisabeth Murray — Cecil Cunningham — 
Marmeln Sisters — Edwin Stevens A Co. — "Motor- 
boating" — Ashley A Allmsn — Whitfield A Ireland 
—Gould A Lewis — Gallando. 

LOB ANGELES, CAL. 
Orphenm — Dorothy Shoemaker A Co. — Boyle A 
Brown — De Leon ft Davles — Marlon Harris — Rosa- 
lind Cogblan A Co. — Lewis A Norton— Roth St. 

Denis A Co Johnston A Harty. 

LOUISVILLE, XT. 
Fontaine Perry Park— Kltner, Hawksley A Mc- 
Kay — Leah Nora — Broslua & Brown — Celts Bros. — 
King A King. 

ST. LOT/IB, M0. 
Forest Park Highlands— H. A A. Seyuioor— Ray- 
mond A O'Connor — The Berreus — Wilson A Aubrey 
—Carl Kifner. 

BAH FBAHCISCO, CAL. 
Orphenm — Ray Snow — Callste Conant — Alexander 
Kids— Dorothy Brenner — Leach Wallen Trio— Nat 
Goodwin— OUvatto, Moffet A Clare. 

INTERSTATE CIRCUIT 

AUSTIN, TEX. 
Majestio (First Half)— Whirling Propellers— 
Charles S. Semon— Melody Six — Swor A Avery — 
James C. Morton — Denny A Woods. 
JOPLIN, HO. 
Electrio (First Half)— Fred A Alleen Vance — 
Six Southern Serenaderg. (Last Half) — WlUlaon A 
Sherwood — Akl Trio. 

KANSAS CITY, KAN. 
Electrio (First Half)— WiUison A Sherwood— Akl 
Trio. (Last Half) — Pete Charles. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Qlobs (Pint Half) — Mendel, Caesar A Kay — 
Delphln A Bae— Prevett-MerrlU— Halley A Noble- 
Harvey Trio. (Lust Half) — Orbasany's Birds— 
Relff A Murray — Allen A McClean — Colombia City 
Four — Casting Campbells. 

LITTLE ROCK, ASK. 
Majestio (First Half)— Cole A Denahy — Thorn- 
dyke A Barnes — Five Immigrants — Walter Wernes 
—Ambler Brothers. (Last Half) — Wheeler A 
Dolan— Newhott A Phelps— -J. C. Morton A Co. — 
Swor A Avery — Whirling Propellers. 
MEMPHIS, TEHH. 
Orphenm (First Half) — Wheeler A Dolan— Bager 
* Soodwlu — Charles Olcott — Ambler Brothers. 
(Last Half) — Melody Six — Park tc Francis — Benny 
A Woods — Casting Lameys. 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OXLA. 
Lyrio (First Half)— May A June — Bert Wain- 
wrlcht A Co. — O'Nell A Wamsley— Three Heltons. 
(Last Half) — Pair man A Patrick — Homer, LlndA 
Co. — Grant Gardner — Klutlng's Animals. 
ST. JOSEPH, XO. 
Eleotrio (First Half)— Pete A Charles. (Last 
Half)— Christy A Griffin — Flying Howard*. 
SPRINGFIELD, XO. 
Electrio (First Half)— Wright A Walker— Raw- 
son A Clare. (Last Half) — Fred A Alleen Vance — 
Six Southern Serenadera. 

BAH ANTONIO, TEXAS. 
Princess (First Half)— Xylo Three— Scott A 
Tlerney— Krane A La Salle— Three Jams. 




F@2° Nmssi W@®lk 



TULSA, OKLA. 
Emprus (Flirt Half) — Dunne & Chapman — Fair- 

man & Patrick— Bonier, Llnd & Co.— Grant Gard- 
ner — Klnttne's Animals. (Last Half)— Mendel, 
Caesar & Ray — Delpblne & Ray— Halley &. N<>Me 
— Harvey Trio. 

W. U. B. O. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
English — Maestro A Co. — Anthony A Adele— 
"Miniature Revue" — Rucker A Winifred— Herbert 
Germalne Trio. 

LOGAHBPOBT, IND. 

Colonial (First Half)— Julia Edwards— Harry 
Coleman — FoUoni A Brown. (Last- Half I — Gallerlal 
Dno— W1U A Kemp. 



LOEW CIRCUIT 

HEW YORK CITY. 
American (First Half) — Noack— Rob A Robert- 
son — Valentine Vox — Granville A Mack — Dore's 
Beaux A Belles — Fred Rogers — Harry Brooks A 
Cow — Nady Lewis A Co. — Howard A James. (Last 
Half)— Three Tlvoli Girls— The Nlgbtons— Cun- 
ningham A Bennett — "Surprise Party" — Mr, A 
Mrs. Thomas — Chas. Rellly. 

Boulevard (First Half) — Stewart A Olive — Mohr 
A Moffatt— Van A Carrie Avery — Fraxer. Bunce 
A Hardy — Seymour's Happy Family. (Last Half) 
— Dancing Demonn — Mills A Lockwood — Howard 
A TroBard — Holmes A Holllston— Elks Trio. 

Avenue B, (First Half) — Cornelia A Adele — 
Knowles A White— Jim McWIlIlams. (Last Half) 
— Orben A Dixie — McSbayne & Hathaway — 

Greeley Square (First Half) — Valdos — Homer A 
Dnbard — Jan Itubln! — "Surprise Party" — Senator 
Murphy — "Girls from Starland." (Last Half) — 
Belle Rotund — Bernlvicl Bros. — "The Alibi" — 
Smith. A Kaufman — LaToy's Models. 

Delancey Street (First Half) — Norton A Noble 
—Three Tlvoli Girls— Martini A Maxmllltan— 
"The Alibi" — Melody Four— Fred LaRelne A Co. 
(Last Half) — Howard A James — Valentine Vox — 
Howard A Sadler — Andy Lewis A Co. — Walters A 
Moore — Glenn ft Burns — Kate A Wiley. 

Lincoln Square (First Half)— Dancing Demons 
— Howard A Sadler— Cunningham A Bennett — 
Baseball Four— Leo A May Jackson. (Last Half) 
— Duval A Simons — Jan Rublni — Hans Roberts A 
Co. — Burns A Lynn. 

National (First Half)— Zlta Lyons— Marshall A 
Covert — Holden A Herron— Gypsy Sonestrrx — 
Smith A Kaufman. (Last Half) — Leo A May 
Jackson — Beth Mayo— Eleanor Haber A Co. — 
Denni A Perri — Baseball Four. 

Orphenm (First Half )— Military Malda A 
Stewart — Dennis A Psrls — Mills A Lockwood — Six 
Serenadera — Chas. Rellly— The Nlgbtons. (Last 
Half)— Dougherty A Lucy— Bob A Robertson — 
Martini A Maxlmllllan — Gypsy Songsters — Andrew 
Kelly — Fnjlama Japs. 

Seventh Avenue (First Half)— Glenn * Burns — 
Andrew Kelly— Hans Roberts A Co.— Elks Trio- 
Kate & Wllev. (Lsst Hairl — Zlta Lyons — Mohr 
A Moffatt— Wheeler & Smith— Chas. Deland A 
Co. — Bosh A Shapiro. 

BROOKLYN. 

Bijou (First Half)— La Toy's Models— Beth Mayo 
— Wheeler A Smith— Eleanor Haber A Co.— Bush 
A Shapiro. (Last Half) — Noack — Marshall A 
Covert — Granville A Mack— Harry Brooke A Co. — 
Senator Murphy — Dope's Beaux A Belles. 

DeKalb (First Half)— Baker A Rogers— Belle 
Rutland — Chas. Deland & Co. — Fnjlama Japs. 
(Last Half)— Stewart A Olive— Fraxer, Bunce A 
Hardy — Congressman Kitty — George Primrose A 
Trio — Fred LaRelne A Co. 

Warwick (First Half) — Congressman Kitty — 
Montrose A Allen— Three Roxcllas. (Last Half)— 
DeArmo A Marguerite — Bernard A Lloyd. 

Fulton (First Half)— Kenney A La France— 
Duval A Simons — Bernlvicl Bros. — Mr. A Mrs. 
Thomas — George Primrose A Co. (Last Half) — 
Norton A Noble — Baker A Rogers— Van A Carrie 
Avery — Melody Four — "Glrla from Starland." 

Palace (First Half)— DeArmo A Marguerite — 
Archer A Ward. (Last Half) — Cornelia A Adele — 
Montrose A Allen— Choy Hong Troupe. 

BALTIMORE, MB. 

Hippodrome — Spiegel A Jones — Payne A Nesblt — 
Storm A Marsden— Bert Howard— Long Tack Sam 
A Co. 

B0ST0H, MASS. 

Orphenm (First Half)— Billy A Ada White—. 
Sally Seeley — Anthony Andrea A Co. — ManDlng 
Sisters — "Mr. Chaser"— Fox A Cross— Nolan A 
Nolan. (Last Half)— Namloh A Nabb— Chaa. C. 
Rice A Co.— Piottl— Little Ceruso— Fern, Richelieu 
ft Fern. 

St. James (First Half)— Helen Vincent— Tom 
Davles A Co. — Brady A Mahoney — Chyo A Chyo. 
(Last Half) — Dellte, Stewart A Hardy — Sampson 
A Douglas — Jos. Remington A Co. — Mnmford A 
Thompson — "Mr. Chsser." 

FALL RIVER. MASS. 

Bijou (First Half)— Fern. Richelieu A Fern — 
Piottl— Chaa. C. Rice A Co.— Little Caruso. (Last 
Haiti— Billy * Ada White— Manning Slaters- 
Tom Davles A Co- — Fox A Cross — Nolan A Nolan. 
HEW ROCHELLE, H. T. 

Loew's (First Half)— Orben A Dixie— Bernard 

A Lloyd "Case for Sherlock." (Last Half) — 

Faster A Fergnsoo — Holden A Herron — Three 

Rosellas. _ 

PBOVTDEHCE. B. I. 

Emery (First Half) — Bobble ft Henshaw— Man- 
ley A Golden — Wells A Co. — Clem Bevlns A Co. 
(Last Half)— Parley A Butler— Sally Seeley— 
"Ankles" — Saunders A Cameron. 
TORONTO, CAN. 

Yonge Street— Walton A Delberg— "Saint A 
Sinner"'— Dotson — "Suffragette Girls" — Sam Harris 
—Gliding O'Meara*. - 



W. V. M. A. 

BILLINGS, MONT. 

Bahcock (June 14)— Harry Watkins— Gerard A 
Grlmn— Field. Keane A Walsh — Echoes of Broad- 
way — Permane — Don Robert A Co. (June 17-18)— 
Gartelll— The Two Farlands— Storm A Clark — Ar- 
thur La Vine A Co.— Daisy Harcourt— Boeder's In- 
ventions. 

BUTTE, X0NT. 

Empress (June 10-11-12) — Marie Genaro— Dae A 
Neville — Lew Hoffman — Bijou Minstrel aliases — 
Roth A Roberts — Radium Models. (June 13-14-15- 
18)— Musical Blue Birds— Cbadwlck A Taylor— 
Robey Trio — Four Old Veterans — Louts London — 
Fred Zobedle A Co. 

EAST ST. LOUD}. ILL. 

Erber'i (First Half)— Klpp A Kippy— Gerald 
Grlmn — Pagg & White— "Oraoge Packers." (Last 
Half)— Maroon — McCormack A Wallace— Gordon A 
Klnley — Archie Nicholson Trio. 

GREAT FALLS. MONT. 

Palace (June 14) — The Rexoa — Gruet. Kramer A 
Gruet — Roadway A Edwards— Fremont. Benton A 
Co.— Charles A Madeline Dunbar — Flying Venn*. 
(June 16-17) — Harry Watkins — Gerald A Grlmn — 
Field. Keane A Walsh — "Echoes of Broadway" — 
Permane — Don Robert. 

HELENA, MONT. 

Liberty (June 11)— Musical Blue Birds— Chad- 
wick A Taylor— Robey Trio — Four Old Veterans — 
Louis London — Fred Zobedle A Co. (June 15) — 
The Rexoa — Gruet, Kramer A Gruet — Rodway ft 
Edwards— Fremont, Benton A Co. — Charles A 
Madeline Dunbar — Flying Venus. 
KENOSHA, WIS. 

Virginia (First Half) — Odonne— Morris A Camp- 
bell — Royal Toklo Troupe. 

LEWI8T0WH. mont. 

Judith (June 12) — The Rexoa — Gruet. Kramer A 
Gruet — Roadway A Edwards — Fremont, Beoton A 
Co. — Charles & Madeline Dunbar — Flying Venus. 
(June 15)— Harry Watkins — Gerald A Griffin — 
Field. Keane A Walah — "Echoes of Broadway" — 
Permane — Don, Robert A Co. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Palace — Curtis Comedy Canines — Catlano A 
O'Brien — "The Explorers" — Three Lyres — Laypo A 
Benjamin. 

NORTH YAKIMA, WASH. 

Empire (June 10-11) — The Ramblers — Van Perre 
A Van Perre — Walters A Walters — Cloaks A Suits 
— Patrlcola A Myers — Leon A Adeline Sisters. 
(Juno 15-16) — Blanche Le Due A Co. — Edna Rlese 
A Co. — Billy Noble A Jeanne Brooks — Musical 
Lnnds — Pauline Saxon — Mennetti A Sldelli. 
OMAHA, NEB. 

Empress (First Half) — Barber aod Jackson — 
Casting Campbells. (Last Half) — Du Mala and 
Floyd — Wellington Four — Miss Le Vain and Co. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 
Hippodrome (First Half) — AlUaton ft Trueeo — 
Canter A Waters — Jolly Trio— Earl Flynn Co. — 
Tax Weatherford — Carlos Caesaro. (Last Half) — 
Bolliger A Reynolds — Le Roy A Mabel Hsrtt — 
Walmsley A Lelghton — Luxanne Dancing Girls — 
Ray Snow— Herbert's Seals. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 
Hippodrome (First Half)— Smllett's Sisters— The 
Balkans — Skelly A Helt— Le Roy A Harvey— Fitch 
Cooper— "The Fashion Shop." (Last Half)— Ned 
Marlon Troupe — Nelson Sisters — Keane A Foxwortb 
— J. C. Lewis, Jr., A Co.— Adolpho— Lucy Gillette 
A Co. 

ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Metropolitan— Conway and Day— Bell Bisters. 
(Last Half) — Clifton and Kramer — Bernard and 
Merrltt — Ross and Ashton. 

BAH FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Casino (First Half)— Superba— Mansfield A Rid- 
dle — Johnson A RoUlson — Moslroff's Gypsies — Lew 
Fltxglbbon — Three Ankers — Moran Sisters — Cowles 
A Dustln — Rothmck * McGraile— Paul Poole — 
Douglas Flint A Co. — Four Charles. 

SIOUX FALLS, 8. D. 
Orphenm (First Half) — Du Mais and Floyd. 
(Last Half)— Darto and Rlalto — Craig and Wade. 
ST. LOUIS, XO. 

Skydome (First Half) — Gllmore A Romanoff — 
Marcou — Archie Nicholson Trio. (Last Half) — 
Fsgg A White— Mack A Maybelle— Love A Wilbur. 

Grand — Alice Cole — Lobse A Sterling— Walters 
A Cantor— Chief Little Elk A Co.— Ted McLean 
A Co. — Lewis A Leopold — Ed A Lottie Ford — 
Princeton Five. 

Empress (First Half)— Millard Bros. — Gordon A 
Klnley— Alice Nelson A Co.— Mack A Maybelle — 
Balxar Sisters. (Last Half)— Wolgsst A Girlie — 
Gerald Griffin — Gllmore A Romanoff — Detxel A Car- 
roll — "Orange Packers." 

Park (First Half)— Wolgast A Girlie — 
Hlrscbell Handler — McCormack A Wallace — Can- 
field A Barnes— Love A Wilbur. (Last Half)— 
Washington Trio — Duffy A Dunn — "The Mystic 
Bird"— Fields A Wells — Isbskswa Bros. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Palace (First Half) — Zeb Zarrow Troupe- 
Nelson Sisters — Keane tc Foiwortb- — J. C. Lewis 
Jr. A Co.— Adolpho— Lacy Gillette A Co. (Last 
. Half) — Leonard A Louie — Canity Sisters — Morton 
Bros. — Monte Carlo Sextette— Dot Maraell — Heye- 
shl Japs. 

SAN JOSE. CAL. 

Victory (First Half)— Bolliger A Reynolds— 
Le Roy A Mabel Hsrtt — Walmsley A Lelghton — 
Luxanne Dancing Girls — Rsy Snow — Herbert's 
Seals. (Last Half)— De Velde A Zelda— Seymour 
A Williams — Lillian Morrow— "Colonial Belles" — 
Billy Brown — Plcolo Midgets. 



SPOKANE, WASH. 

Hippodrome (First Half) — Florcnae Duo — Dorothy 
Hayes A Co.— Begley A Rowland— Witching Hour 
Witches— John A. West— Eller's Novelty. (Last 
Half) — Kawana Bro*. — Bessie Lester— Selble A 
Llllle — Princess Ks— Newport A Stirk— Roy llar- 
rah A Qtrla. 

TACOMA, WASH. 

Regent (First Half)— Leonard A Louie— Oarrlty 
Sisters— Norton Bros.— Monte Carlo Sextettes-Dot 
Marsell — Hayashl Japs. (Laat Half) — Van rerre 
A Van Perre — The Ramblers— Walters A Walters 
—Cloaks ft Suits— Patrlcola A Myers— Leon ft 
Adeline Sisters. 

WALLA WALLA, WASH. 
Liberty (June 10) — Blanche I* Due A Co.— 
Edna Rlese A Co. — Billy Nobis A Jeanne Brooks — 
Musical Lands — Pauline Saxon — Mennetti A 
Sldelli. (June 15-16) — Florenae Dno— Dorothy 
Hayes A Co.— Begley A Bowland— Witching Hour 
Witches — John A. West — Eller's Novelty. 

PANTACES' CIRCUIT 

COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 
Pantagea'— "Bachelor Dinner"— Billy Swede 
Hall A Co.— Patrlcola— Tatar A llrecu- -Ed Price 
ft Pals. 

CALGARY, OAK. 
Pantagea'— "Wanted a Wife"— Royal Gss.-olgnes 
— Julian Hall — "'Women" — Lucler Trio. 

DENVER, COLO. 

Pantagea'— Dolly Castle A Co.— Francis Renault 
—Wells. Norworth 4 Montgomery — John P. Wade 
A Co. — "Smart Shop" — Tom Kelly. 

EDMONTON, CAN. 
Pantagea'— "Breath of Old Virginia"— Holmes 
A La Ver<! — Movie Girls — Rondaa Trio— Morris A 
Allen. 

GREAT PALLS, XONT. 
Pantagea'— Mlsa Hamlet— KloU A Nash— I.ella 
Sbaw A Co.— Swain's Hats A Cats— Howard Klb- 
bel A Herbert. 

KANSAS CITY. XO. 
Pantacea'— Cedora— Bernardl— Itawls A Von 
Kaufman— Geo. and Mae LaPevre— Oakland Si»tir« 
—Billy Small. 

LOB ANGELES, CAL. 
Pantagea'— Elmlwa Japa— Knickerbocker Four- 
Chris. Richards— Paul Decker A Co.— Three Mar- 
coni Bros. — Phnnpblends. 

MINNEAPOLIS, XTNN. 
Pontages'— Chas. Ahearn A Co.— "Birth of a 
Rose" — Kane A Herman — Nelson A Nelson — God- 
frey A Henderson. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 
Pantages'— (First Half)— "Girl from Amster- 
dam' —Harry Sydell— Roach ft McCurdy— Aaard 
Bros.— Wilton Sisters— Barbler Thatcher A Co. 

OGDEN, UTAH. 
Pantages'— Tbslero's Animals— "Fe-Mall Clerks" 
— Mblo's Birds— Tuscano Bros. — Bob Hall- 
Bernard A Myers. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 
Pantagea'— Stephens A HolUster— Pedvrson 
Bros.— Olaen A Johnson— Kajlyama— "Six Peaches 
tc Pair." 

RAN DIEGO, CAL. 

Pantagea' — "Texas Roundup" — Adler A Arline 

Bruce Duffett A Co.— LeElocn A Dul'reece— Weber 
Heck A FntMcr. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Pantagea'— "Dueeda Girl"— Reed A Hudnon— 
La EstroUta— Billy McDermott— Jed A Ethel 
Dooley. 

BAH FRANCISCO. CAL. 
Pantages' — Capt. Sorcbo — Anderson's Girl Revue 
—Ed A Jack Smith — Jerome A Carson— Stoddard 
A Hoynes — Freddy James. 

SPOKANE, WASH. 

Pantages' — Miller 'A Lyle — Ed Blondell— Moure's 
Magailne Girls — Gerard's Monks— Four Gillespie 
Girls. 

SUPERIOR, WIS. 
Broadway— Curxou Sisters— M»rnu A Wiser— De- 
vine A Williams— Piano Song Four. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Pantages'— "Honeymoon Isle"— Will Marrlsey— 

Ed F. Reynard ft Co -Alberto— Mile. Blsnra — 

Dorothy Vaughan. 

TACOMA, WASH. 
Pantagea' — Alber'a Polar Bears — Ryan A Rich- 

Held — Minnie Allen — Willie Hale tc Bro Ten 

California Dancing Girls — Geo. Morton. 

VANCOUVER, CAN. 
Pantages' — "Hello Japan" — Will A Mary 
Rogers— D'Amour A Douglas— University Four— 
Wm. Schilling A Co. 

VICTORIA, CAN. 
Pantages'— Fong Choy — Stagpoole A Spier- 
Three Symphony Maids— Antrim A Vale. 

WINNIPEG. CAN. 
Pantages'— "Mimic World"— Abra ins Johns A 
Co.— Joe Roberta— The Lamplnls— Smith A Mc- 
Ordre. 

s. a C. CIRCUIT 

DETROIT. MICH. 
Xilea— Four 1813 Girls— Brennen A Cleveland 
— Knickerbocker Trfn — Adams llros. — Howard's 
'Yellow PerlL" 



FARGO, H. D. 
Grand (First Hslt) — Cooper A HIckey— "Your 
Own Bed Co."— The Marrendas^ — Rogers ft Mack — 
Sorority Girls. (last Half)— Zcda A Hoot- 
Ethel Costello— Edwin Keough A Co.— Aerlsl 
Eddys — Harrison A Stewart. 

(Contfnsiexf otv page 34.) 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, "1917 



Charl 




"Variety" Said: 

Betty Bond. 

"Five Flights of Musical Comedy." 

17 Mins.: One and a Half (Special Drop). 

Riverside. 

Betty Bond as a single means special material, 
special setting and Betty"Bond. One never seems 
to rise above the other. It may be the material 
or it may be Miss Bond. The chances are that 
it is both. "Five Flights of Musical Comedy" 
is the title of this act written by Charles McCar- 
ron and also produced by him, although in what 
sense it has been produced or staged other than 
Miss Bond singing songs in different dresses 
doesn't make itself evident. The drop is the ex- 
terior of an 'apartment house, with the elevator's 
entrance close to the sidewalk. Miss Bond walks 
out from the elevator, after making rapid changes 
of good looking costumes, with the indicator 
pointing each time to the floor she descended 
from, commencing with 1. The numbers, "An 
Innocent Girl," "Little Italy Girl," "365 Days in 
the Year," "Baby Butterfly" and "Military Eyes" 
mention the floors in rotation as the place where 
the singer lives. The idea, no doubt, suggests 
possibilities for a "single." It wasn't a bad 
scheme, but "the act" depended upon the mate- 
rial and the interpreter of it. Both fail in their 
respective duties. Of the songs, only "Military 
Eyes," closing the act and pushing it over, is 



worthy of the idea and setting. It's a good num- 
ber with a flag finish that can't fall down at this 
time, but there had been nothing preceding to 
warrant the house adding up its applause for this 
number alone, so it had to stand by itself. In 
fact. Miss Bond had to press the limit to reach 
the finale, for her four other songs were very 
mildly received, some even less so. She created 
a wrong and poor impression at the outset by the 
only really character number tried by her, "The 
Innocent Kid," who spoke of a bridal couple liv- 
ing upstairs and what she heard through the air- 
shaft, also other things that "were over her 
head." This style of lyric isn't for a "neat" or 
"refined single." If special song material is going 
to run along the blue lines, such as appears quite 
probable of late, the vaudeville managers had 
better get out their censoring pads in their of- 
fices rather than to await the stage debut and let 
it be known that all lyrics must be absolutely 
clean. "The Innocent Kid" thing is a story as 
silly as the character is partially made to appear. 
The other numbers have no especial merit, with 
the "Butterfly" song only noted for its dressing, 
while the "Italy Girl" carried a very familiar mel- 
ody. One number programed, called "Betty 
Bond," 'was not used. Miss Bond doesn't alter 
her singing expression at present sufficiently to 
handle a variety of numbers, it would seem. In 
the "No. 2" spot at the Riverside Tuesday eve- 
ning the singer got little. If she is to succeed 



in this single on big time new numbers are neces- 
sary, otherwise Miss Bond, a fairly comely 
brunette with a dimple, but no particular mag- 
netism, may be considered a classy act for small 
time. If she continues over the big time in this 
turn, Miss Bond will be just luckily slipping 
past. . Sime. 

Morning 'Telegraph" Said: 

Betty Bond Gives Musical Comedy "Flights" 
Has an Act That Is Different 

Betty Bond, formerly of the team of Bond & 
Casson, is* making her metropolitan debut as a 
single in a novel routine by Charles McCarron, 
called. "Five Flights of Musical Comedy." 

Miss Bond has a novel way of- making her 
entrance through an elevator door and, on this 
score alone, must receive credit for an act that is 
different. Her five "flights" represent "An Inno- 
cent Kid," the "Little Italy Girl," "365 Days in 
the Year," "Military Eyes" and, finally, Betty 
Bond as herself. As an encore, she appears in 
natty military costumes, for a special number of 
a patriotic nature, which, referring to the na- 
tion's Chief Executive, says, in song, that "He 
Has Military Eyes," and that were we in need 
of money to see us through, "he'd hock the 
Kaiser for a dollar or two." This line brought a 
hearty response, but not essential to Miss Bond's 
success. 



In Five Flights of Musical Comedy Booked by Arthur Klein for Forty Weeks over the U. B. O. Time, 

Starting in August. 



MARIE STODDARD 



In "A Vaudeville Caricature " 



Just returned after a most successful tour of all the B. F. Keith and Orpheum Theatres. 

Now at B. F. Keith's Colonial Theatre 

Direction— MAX HAYES 



Americans Representative 
Dancers 

ADELAIDE 

and 

HUGHES 



SOPHIE 
TUCKER 

and her S Kings oj 

Sjncepatlon 



M'z't Max Hart 



WALTER 

DE LEON 

and 
MARY 

DAVIES 

'Behind The Front" 

DIR. MAX HART 



SYLVESTER 

AND 

VANCE 

inaskit byWUlord Math 
DIR. PETE HACK 



NAN 
HALPERIN 



Management 
E. F. Albee 



ROBERT 

D O ft E 

The Eminent Barytone 
Direction Paul Durand 



GEORGE M. 
ROSENER 

The Representative 

Character Actor 

of American 

Vaudeville 



CHAS. McCARRON 
presents 

BETTY 
BOND 

In Fivt Flights of Musical 

Conudy. Captured Bl> 

'Arthur Klein. 



CHARLIE 
HOWARD 



Management 
Max Hart 



EDYTHE 
& EDDIE 
ADAIR 

im 

"At the Shoe Shop" 

STOKER & B1BRBAUER. 



ELIZABETH 

M. 

MURRAY 



Dir. Alj. T. Wilton 



WILLIAM- 



H ALLEN 



and 
ETHEL 



HUNTER 

Directum— Pete Mack 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 





Routes Must Reack THI. Offic« Not Later 
Than Saturday 

Barrie's, J. M., Flayers (Chas. Frohman, Inc., 

mgr.) — Empire, New York, lndef. 
"Brot, Tbe" (Oliver Horosco, mgr.)— Moros- 

co.. New York, lndef. 
Collier, Wm. (H. H. Frazee, Mgr.) — Long- 
acre, New York, lndef. 
Cowl, Jane (Selwyn & Co., mgrs.) — Harris, 

New York, indef. 
Clarke, Harry Corson and Margaret Dale 

Owen — Calcutta, India, lndef. 
"Pair and Warmer" (Selwyn & Co., mgrs.) — 

Park Sq., Boston, lndef. 
"Her Soldier Boy" (Tbe Shuberts, mgr.) — 

Shubert, New York, indef. 
"Highway, The" (The Shuberts, Mgr.) — 

Shubert, Boston, lndef. 
"His Little Widows" (O. M. Anderson & 

Lawrence Weber, mgrs.) — Astor, New York. 

lndef. 

•His Bridal Night," with Dolly Sisters (A. 

H. Woods, Mgr.) — Wilbur, Boston, lndef. 
"Knife, The" — Bijou, New York, indef. 
"Love o' Mike" (Elizabeth, Marbury. mgr.) — 

Muxine Elliott's, New York, lndef. 
"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 

mgr.) — Playhouse, New York, lndef. 
"Oh Boy" — -Princess, New York, lndef. 
"Our Betters" (John D. Williams, Mgr.) — 

Hudson, New York, 4-9. 
"Pals First" (J. Fred Zimmerman, mgr.) — 

Fulton, New York, lndef. 
"Passing Show of 1917" — Winter Garden, 

New York, lndef. 
"Peter Ibbetson" (Lee Sbnbert, mgr.) — Re- 
public, New York, indef. 
"Pawn, The" — Princess, Chicago, lndef. 
"Smarter Set" (C. I* Convell. mgr.) — Cam- 
den, N. J., 4-9; Baltimore, Md., 11-18. 
"Seven Chances" (David Belasco, mgr.) — 

Cort, Chicago, lndef. 
"So Long Letty" (Oliver MoroBco, mgr.) — 

Lyric. Philadelphia, lndef. 
"Tbe 18th Chair" — Forty-eighth Street. New 

York, indef. 
"Turn to the Right" (Smith A- Golden, Mgrs.) 

— Gaiety, New York, lndef. 
"Turn to the Rlgbt," (Smith & Golden, Mgrs.) 

- -Grand. Chicago, indef. 
"Treasure Island* 1 (Chas. Hopkins, mgr.) — 

Hollis. Boston, lndef. 
"Tailor-Made Man" (Cohan & Harris, Mgrs.) 

— Tremont, Boston, lndef. 
"Upstairs and Down" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 

— Cort, New York, lndef. 
"Very Good Eddie" (Marbury, Cometock Co., 

mgrs.) — Garrlck, Chicago, lndef. 
Washington Sq. Players — Comedy, New York, 

Indef. _ „ 

"When Johnny Comes Marching Home" (F. 

C. Whitney, mgr.) — Manhattan, New York, 

lndef. 
"You're In Love" (Arthur Hammerstein, 

mgr.) — Casino, New York, indef. 

STOCK 

Academy Players — Haverhill, Mass., lndef. 

Auditorium Players — Maiden, Mass., lndef. 

Alcazar Players — San Francisco, lndef. 

Albee Stock (Chas. Lovenberg, mgr.) — 
Providence, n. I., lndef. 

Angell Stock (Joe Angell, mgr.) — Park, Pitts- 
burgh, lndef. 

Aogell's Comedians (Billy O. Angelo, mgr.) 
— VilllBCa, la., 4-9. 

Arlington Stock— Bed Cloud, Neb., 4-9, Mc- 
Cook. 11-16. 

Baker Stock — Portland, Ore., lndef. 

Bryant, Marguerite, Players — Altoona, Pa., 
3, indef. 

Brown, Clark, Stock — Montreal, Can., indef. 

Brown, Clark, Stock — Hamilton, Can., lndef. 

Bishop Players — Oakland, Gal., indef. 

Bonstelle, Jessie, Stock — Detroit, lndef. 

Boyer, Nancy, Stock — Kalamazoo, Mich., ln- 
def. 

Brndy, PauL Players — Greenville, O., 3-9. 

Columbia Musical Stock — Oakland, Cal., in- 
def. 

Cornell-Price Players — Wauseon, O., indef. 

Columbia Stock — Georgetown, DeL, 4-9 ; 
Lewis, 11-16. 

Dale, Kathryn, Stock — Omaha, Neb., indef. 

Desmond, Mae, Co. (Ed. Cuddy, mgr.) — 
Schenectady, N. Y., lndef. 

Dainty, Bessie, Players (I. E. Earle. mgr.) — 
Dallas, Tex., indef. 

Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.) — Sharps- 
burg, Pa., lndef. 

Emerson Players — Lowell, Mass., lndef. 

Garden Theatre Stock — Kansas City, Mo., 
lndef. 

Glaser. Vaugban, Stock — Alvln, Plttsbnrgh, 
indef. 

Gordinler Bros., Stock — Ft. Dodge, la., lndef. 

Horne, Col. F. P.. Stock — Akron, O., indef. 

Jewett, Henry, Players — Copley, Boston, ln- 
def. 

Keith's Hudson Theatre, Stock — Union Hill, 
N. J., indef. 

Keith Stock — Portland, Me., lndef. 

Knickerbocker Players — Syracuse, N. Y., in- 
def. 

Lawrence, DeL, Stock — San Francisco, lndef. 

Lyric Theatre Stock — Bridgeport, Conn., in- 
def. 

Lyric Light Opera Co. — Providence, R. I., 
lndef. 

Morosco Stock — Lob Angeles, lndef, 

Manhattan Players — Rochester, N. Y., lndef. 

McWatters & Webb Stock— Saginaw, Mich., 
indef. 

New Strand Stock — Mobile, Ala., lndef. 

Opera Plavcrs — Hartford, Conn., lndef. 

Orphenm Players (Geo. Ebey, mgr.) — Oak- 
land, Cal., indef. _ 

Oliver, Ot|s, Players (Harry J. Wallace, 
mgr.) — Lincoln, Neb., 8, lndef. 



Oliver, Otis. Playera — Richmond, Ind., lndef. 

Payton, Corse, Stock — Lexington, New York, 
Inder. 

Poll Players — Poll's, Washington, lndef. 

Poll Players — Worcester, Mass.. lndef. 

raekard, Jay, Stock — Newark, N. J., lndef. 

Price, Stanley, Players — Grand Rapids, 
Micb., lndef. 

Robins, Edward, Stock — Toronto, Can., lndef. 

Shubert Stock — Milwaukee, lndef. 

Shubert Stock — St. Paul, lndef. 

Somerville Theatre Players — Somervllle, 
Mass., lndef. 

St Clair, Winifred Stock (Earl Sipe, mgr.) 
— Trenton, N. J., Indef. 

Toler, Sydney, Stock — Portland, Me„ indef. 

Trovers-Douglas Stock — Grand O. H., Brook- 
lyn, Indef. 

Van Dyke & Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 
Joplln, Mo., lndef. 

Vees, Albert, Stock — Wheeling, W. Va., lndef. 

Wilkes Musical Stock — Vancouver, Can., ln- 
def. 

Wadsworth Dram. Stock (Edward Ornsteln, 
mgr.) — Toledo. 0., lndef. 

Williams, Ed., Stock— Elkhart, Ind., lndef. 

Williams. Ed., Stock — Qutncy, 111., lndef. 

Woods, Lew, Stock — Syracuse, N. Y., lndef. 

Walker, Stuart, Players — Indianapolis, Indef. 

Woodward, O. D.. Players — Denver, lndef. 

Wilkes Players — Seattle, Wash., 10, indef. 

COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS 

Permanent and Traveling 

Gramllck's, Chas., Follies of the Day — Moose 

Jaw, Can., lndef. 
Jewell Golden Jubilee Co. (Max Golden, 

mgr.) -^-Atlanta, Go., 4-9. 
Lord & Vernon Mus. Com, Co. — Henryetta, 

Okla., 4-9. 
Reldway & Burton M. C. Co. — Mlnot. N. D., 

lndef. 
Shaffer's Boys and Girls — Dnrant, Okla., 

8-11; Dennlson, Tex., 10-16. 
Submarine .Girls (Mersereau Bros., mgrs.) — 

Drumrigbt, Okla., 3-9. 
Tabarin Girls (Dave Newman, mgr.) — Brad- 
dock, Pa., 4-9. 
Walker's Music Bugs (Ed. M. Moore, mgr.) — 

McKeesport, Pa., 4-6 ; Greenville, 7-9 : 

Meadvllle, 11-16. 
Zarrow's American Girl Co. — Parkersburg, 

W. Va., 4-9. 
Zarrow's Little Bluebird Co. (Jack Fuquay, 

mgr.) — Corry, Pa., 4-9. 
Zarrow's Variety Review (D. J. Lynch, mgr.) 

— TJniontown, Pa., 4-9. 

CARNIVALS 

Allen, Tom W., Shows — Nebraska, Neb., 4-9. 
Brown's Greater Shows — Weston, W. Va., 

4-9. 
Barkoot, K. G., Shows — Paterson, N. J.. 4-9. 
Bernard! Greater Shows — Le Mars, la.. 4-9. 
Clifton-Kelly Shows— Clinton, Ind., 4-9. 
Copping, Harry, Shows — Phllllpsburg, Pa., 

4-9. 
Dreamland Expo. Shows — Sciotoville, O., 4-9. 
Eastern Amuse. Co. — Lewiston, Me., 4-9. 
Evans, Ed. A., Shows — Dixon, 111., 4-9. 
Great Patterson Shows — Ottumwa, Mo., 4-9. 
Ferari, Francis, Shows — Cambridge, O., 4-9. 
Greater Parker Shows — Logansport, Ind., 4-9. 
Great Excelsior Shows — Huntington, Pa., 

4-9. 
Great American Shows — Flint, Mich., 4-9. 
Great Cosmopolitan Shows — Clinton, Ind., 

4-9. 
Jones, Johnny J.. Show — Warren, Pa., 4-9. 
Kennedy, Con. T.. Shows — Washington, 4-9. 
Llttleiohn'B United Shows — Danville, Ky., 

4-9. 
Metropolitan Shows — Greenville, N. C, 4-9. 
Murphy's, F. F., Shows — Hlnton, W. Va., 4-9. 
Rutherford Greater Shows — Rankin, Pa., 4-9. 
Reynolds, George, Shows — Clarksburg, W. 

Va., 4-9. 
Veal's Famous Shows — Catlettsburg, Ky., 4-9. 
World at Home Shows — Anaconda, Mont., 

4-9; Butte, 11-16. 
Zeldman & Pollle Shows — Milwaukee, 4-9. 

CIRCUSES 

Barnes, Al. G. — Ritzvllle, Wash., 6 ; Rosalia, 
7 : Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, 8 ; Spokane, 
Wash., 9. 

Cole Bros. — New England,' N. D.. 6: Mott, 
7; Mcintosh, S. D., 8; Hettinger, 9. 

Cook Bros. — Smethport, Pa., 6: St. Marys. 
7; Brookville, 8: Ford City. 9; Breckeu- 
ridge, 1 1 ; Cannonsbnrg, 13 ; McDonald. 
14 ; Cadiz. O., 15. 

Honest Bill — Spalding, Neb., 6 ; Cedar 
Rapids. 7 : Belgarde, 8 : Fullerton, 9. 

La Tenaa— BcUcvue, O., 6 ; Wauseon, 7 ; Au- 
burn. Ind., 8; Goshen, 9. 

Rlngllng Bros. — Boston, 4-9 ; Lynn, 11 ; 
Salem, 12 ; Lowell, 18 ; Lawrence, 14 ; 
Manchester, N. H., 15 ; Fltcbbnrg, Mass., 
16. 

Sells-Floto— Gary, Ind,, 7; Streator, 111., 13; 

Aurora, 14 ; Evanaton, 15 : Elgin, 16. 
Wlllard, Jess. & Buffalo Bill Wild West — 
New Haven, Conn., 6 ; Torrlngton, 7 ; 
Waterbury, 8; Hartford, 9. 

BANDS AND ORCHESTRAS 

Franko, Nahan — Willow Grove Park, Phlla.. 
indef. 

Tinker's Singing Orchestra — Easton. Me.. 6 ; 
Mllllnocket", 7; BrownviUe Jet., 8; Ban- 
gor, 9 ; Exeter, 11 ; Lincoln, 12 ; W. En- 
field. IS: Dexter. 14: Newport. 15: Au- 
burn, 16. 

{Continued on page 34.) 



Who Is This? 

It is one of the acts to appear at 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre, 

week of June 1 8. 



\ "-■ ' ■>■ ^iaSsfeftH 


HflH 




-"4k / 

By 


^al^v 


BJHy .J? 


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ksr .^bW 






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- -*^- "jy^BPir ' i^^ " 1 "t5I 




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■ ,',■'''/■ "■.■."":-■ aM 

'/■•:■ -. '■■■ ^'A'-'-'-'HBl' - 


lit - \ 



The first successful guesser of this 
cut-out puzzle will receive two box 
seats to a performance at the Palace 
the week of June 18, where the 
original will be on view. 

Send solutions care of "B. V. D.," 
Clipper, New York. 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



Two Newcomers in Burlesque and Grsatmg a Gcnninn Sensation at tha Olympic Thaatre, Can Ba Saas in Their Second Week an Fourteenth Street, n—lllllllia To 

Offer* Invited for Nat P 



MORRIS PERRY 



AND 



DIXIE DeVERE 



HEBREW COMEDIAN AND PRODUCER. DIRECTION OF ROEHM & RICHARDS, STRAND THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY. VIOLINISTE AND INGENUE. 



MANAGERS. ATTENTION! TWO GOOD MEN FOR BURLESQUE OPEN FOR NEXT SEASON 

jack SIX/IITM arid 1—IE.EZ milton 

STRAIGHT CHARACTERS 
Can Write and Produce Special Numbers. Address Room 6, 1604 Broadway, New York. Care Sid. Rankin 


AT LIBERTY 

JIM PEARL 

THE VERSATILE COMEDIAN AND 

ECCENTRIC DANCER 

DOING IRISH THIS WEEK at the OLYMPIC 

"I Don't Stop the Show, I Keep It Going" 

Address 201 W. 38th St.. New York 

Direction— ROEHM and RICHARDS 


Let the Clipper Get You 
Your Liberty Bond 

It is the patriotic duty of every Americas to aid in financing the war, 
and everyone in the Amusement Business should subscribe (or his share of the 
Liberty Loan. 

This ABSOLUTELY SAFE investment pays three and one-half per cent. 

"Not a cent of money invested in Liberty Bonds will leave the country," 
Assistant Secretary of Agriculture Vrooman fays. "Every dollar of the 
92,000,000,000 Liberty Loan," he adds, "bonds of which are now on public 
sale, will stay in the United States. Funds placed at the disposal of the Gov- 
ernment through patriotic purchases of Liberty Bonds will be. spent in this 
country, providing funds for wages and purchases of food, supplies and other 
things needed by our armies and the armies of our allies and their people. 
This great war chest fund cannot be expended without promoting prosperity. 
It means a free circulation of funds with substantial prices." 

F01 out this blank at once and mail it to the 
LIBERTY BOND DEPARTMENT 

of The New York Cupper, 1604 Broadway, New York. 

TEAR OFF AND MAIL 


WANTED FOR CHAS. M. BAKER'S 

SPEEDWAY GIRLS 

on the American Burlesque wheel 

PRINCIPALS and CHORUS 

The Best in Show Business 

Room 617, Gaiety Theatre Bldg., New York 


To the LIBERTY BOND DEPT., 

NEW YORK CUPPER. 
I want to subscribe to the Liberty Loan. Please send me application 
blank and terms of payment. 


WANTED 

MUSICAL COMEDY PEOPLE, Principals and Chorus. Directors with A No. 1 
Scripts. Must be First Class. For Summer Parks. Have opening for organized 
Musical Comedy company with reputation. EL A. PROVENCHER. GenL Park 
Manager, Bay State Street Ry- Co., IS Milk St., Boston, Mass. 


Address. 




Write name and 






FOR SALE 

Fourteen Sets of Beautiful Interior Scenery 

Practically new. AH 14 ft. high. Some sets costing $300.00. The first $40.00 
takes the first set and so on, until they're gone. Write or wire HARRY COLE- 
MAN 1523 No. 19th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 


D;A. V E FRED 

FOX ano MAYO 

IN VAUDEVILLE Direction LEW LESLIE 






= AX LIBFIRTY 

MILDRED HASTINGS 

Characters Heavies 

Account Chase Lister House show closing 40 weeks' engagement. One management five years 
previous. Height S ft. PA in., weight 150 lbs.. age 35. A-l appearance and wardrobe on and off. 
Versatile. Reliable managers only. Per address, MILDRED HASTINGS, Clowery Court, Apart- 
ment L. 17th and Chicago Sts.. Omaha. Neb. 


Dave Station Dewey Weinglass 

4-DANGING DEMONS-4 

ACROBATIC, ECCENTRIC AND RUSSIAN DANCING 

Lillian Williams Direction, Chas. Fitzpabick Madge Davis 






ZELLA RAMBO 

IN VAUDEVILLE 


Stffii^S B O Y I_ A 1M 

In Spectacular Novelty Dances 

JUNE 4-5-6: Windsor, Chicago; JUNE 7-8-9-10: Kedne Chicago 
W. V. M. A. Time Direction Harry Spingold 



June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 




MANY CHANGES 

MADE IN FOX 

COMPANY 

CUMMINGS, HOLMES, VINCENT, OUT 



The Fox producing organization baa 
undergone a somewhat radical overhauling 
in the past few weeks through the depart- 
ure of Irving Cummings, Stuart Holmes, 
Violet Palmer and Director James Yin- 
cent, besides several members of the me- 
chanical staff, including camera men and 
staging crews. 

The most interesting of the changes was 
the departure of Stuart Holmes, who bad 
been considered a fixture with the Fox or- 
ganization, be having been connected with 
the concern since its entry into the pro- 
ducing business. It was learned that 
Holmes took his departure after having 
interfered in the business affairs of his 
company, in such a way as did not re- 
ceive the sanction of Samuel F. Kingston, 
in charge of the producing department. 

Cummings has been playing the leads 
opposite Virginia Pearson and appeared in 
two pictures with her. It was learned that 
he had a two-year contract with the con- 
cern, made about six months ago. It is 
understood that he tendered his resignation 
two weeks ago. After leaving the concern 
he organized a film producing company, 
with Lois Meredith, and is now engaged in 
the production of features. 

Vincent, who has been directing Miss 
Pearson since she joined the Fox forces, 
left, it was learned, after fault bad been 
found with bis work. With him went 
A. O. Huehn, his assistant, who was im- 
mediately employed by Cummings to act as 
director of his pictures. The entire stage 
crew that worked with Vincent left with 
him with the exception of Gilbert Van 
Osdale. 

Carl Harbough, who has been acting as 
director for the Holmes company, was 
shifted to the directorship of the Pearson 
company. Harbough is said to stand highly 
in the regard of William Fox, and this 
move, it is said, is a step toward pushing 
him to the front in the ranks of directors. 
Violet Palmer, who worked with the 
Holmes company, also left, and Wanda 
Petit, who likewise, was a member of this 
company, has been transferred to the Will- 
iam Farnum Company, which came from 
the California studios and is now engaged 
in making pictures under the direction of 
Frank Lloyd at Sag Harbor, L. I., Far- 
num's country home. 

It is rumored that Harry Hilliard, play- 
ing the lead opposite June Caprice, will 
also leave the organization upon the com- 
pletion of a picture he is now appearing 
in with Miss Caprice. 

Frank C. Kugler, one of the oldest cam- 
era men in point of service with the Fox 
organization, has also left. Karl Gregory, 
his assistant, was appointed in his stead, 
with Director Buell. Joe Ruttenberg has 
been promoted to the position of camera 
man, Director William Nigb's company. 

It was learned that when Director 
Raonll Walsh arrives from California 

within the next few weeks, he and Mr. 
Fox will take up the matter of making more 
radical changes in the producing organiza- 
tions at the Eastern studio. 



BUYERS IN TOWN 

Among the state rights buyers who ar- 
rived in the city during the last few days 
were: 

J. RifWns, Eastern Feature Film Co., 
Boston. 

H. G. Segal, Globe Theatre, Boston. 

Joseph Lewis, Owl Feature Co., Chi- 
cago. 

R. C. Dresner, Washington, D. C. 

Barrett CHara, Chicago. 



SENNETT DENIES SHIFT PLAN 

Thomas Ince and Mack Sennett, of the 
Triangle-Keystone forces at Hollywood, 
who have been in New York for about 
two weeks, are reported to be negotiating 
for new distributing connections. Sen- 
nett issued a- denial of this to The Clipper, 
but phrased his statement with certain 
restraint. 

"I don't contemplate making any change 
at this time," he said. 

In view of persistent rumors that a 
change has been under discussion, how- 
ever, it is generally believed that Sen- 
nett and Ince, though they may not shift 
at this time, are likely to have new rela- 
tions at a not distant date. 



"REDEMPTION" RUN EXTENDED 

The feature film, "Redemption," re- 
leased to state righters by Julius Steger, 
Longacre building, New York, bas received 
an extension of its run at the George M. 
Cohan Theatre. The film is now in its 
third week. The drawing power of Evelyn 
Xesbitt and her son Russell Thaw, leading 
characters in tbe film, is given credit for 
its success. 

It was only intended to run the picture 
for two weeks in the present engagement, 
but the attendance so far exceeded expec- 
tations that tbe extension was decided 
upon. 



FAIRBANKS FIGHTS REISSUE 
Stating that the Triangle is doing him 
a great injustice, in assembling the dis- 
carded scenes of his various Fine Arts 
productions, and releasing them as new 
two-reel pictures, Douglas Fairbanks this 
week communicated with the New York 
Artcraft office, soliciting their aid to ad- 
vise exhibitors that all the pictures made 
during the life of his Triangle contract 
have already been released, the last one 
being "The Americano." 



"PARENTAGE" SHOWING TODAY 

Frank J. Seng's elaborate feature film 
"Parentage," described as a powerful 
sociological message, will have its first trade 
showing at 10 o'clock this morning at tbe 
Rialto Theatre. Mr. Seng expects to re- 
lease this picture to state rights buyers. 
His offices are at 505 Times building, New 
York City. 



"SUBMARINE EYE" DRAWS WELL 

Williamson Brothers are making arrange- 
ments to have their super feature "The 
Submarine Eye" put on for a run at the 
Bushwick Theatre, in Brooklyn. The film 
bas been doing an unusually heavy busi- 
ness at the Liberty Theatre in New York. 



LINCOLN CYCLE AT GLOBE 

Benjamin Chapin's stirring photo-play 
series, "The Lincoln Cycle," which during 
the last week entertained big crowds at 
the Strand Theatre, moved into the Globe 
Theatre this week for an unlimited en- 
gagement. 

"UNCLE SAM AWAKE!" PROSPERS 

"Uncle Sam Awake," tbe preparedness 
film released to state rights buyers by the 
Uncle Sam Awake Co., of 220 West Forty- 
second Street, has been having a good run 
in Chicago. Burr Mcintosh is an added 
attraction, with his preparedness lecture. 



HOFFMAN GETS NEW OFFICES 
Tbe M. H. Hoffman Feature Film Co., 
releasing "The Sin Woman," and the 
Bernstein productions, has moved from the 
seventeenth to the seventh floor in the 
Godfrey building, obtaining more spacious 
quarters. 



SHOW "CHRISTUS" FRIDAY 

Historic Features, Inc. announce a 
special trade showing of "Cbristus" at the 
Criterion Theatre Friday morning at 1030 
o'clock. Buyers and exhibitors are in* 
vited. Tbe film deals with the life of 
Christ 



LOW ADMISSION 

HOUSES ESCAPE 

WARTAX 

ONLY HIGHER PRICED ONES TO PAY 



Tbe motion picture industry obtained a 
notable victory last week through the de- 
cision of the Senate Finance Committee 
at Washington to exempt all film theatres 
charging twenty-five cents or less for ad- 
mission from the proposed war tax. The 
action took place after a strenuous fight, in 
which first the five-cent and then the ten- 
cent admissions were removed, by sepa- 
rate votes, from taxation. 

The sentiment clearly was to relieve the 
poor man's amusement from the burden of 
war cost The exemption of 25-cent ad- 
missions finally carried by only one vote. 

Taxation upon admissions at legitimate 
theatres, circuses, ball games, and other 
attractions was allowed to stand. The bill 
also retains tbe clause imposing a tax 
upon excess profits in the manufacture of 
films. 

It is regarded as certain that the full 
Congress will support the committee's ex- 
emption of the poorer class film theatre 
from any admission tax. 



TRIANGLE RELEASES CHANGED 

There has been a rearrangement of the 
Triangle release schedule for June. "Wolf 
Lowry," the William S. Hart production 
which was originally announced for re- 
lease June 10 was put forward on the 
program two weeks and shown in first- 
run houses May 27, together with "The 
Millionaire Vagrant," in which Charles 
Ray is being starred. 

DESTROY "INTOLERANCE" SET 

The "Intolerance" set of D. W. Grif- 
fith at Hollywood, which has been held 
intact for two years, is being torn down. 
A new one will be built for the producer 
to work with. 



GOODWIN STARTS COMPANY 

Nat Goodwin, who arrived recently in 
Los Angeles, plans to build a studio on 
his San Jacinto ranch. He has organized 
a company. 



FRANCISCO MAKING FILM 

R. M. Francisco, who promoted tbe mo- 
tion picture version of "The Daughter of 
the Don," is producing a new picture at 
Monrovia on the coast. 



SALISBURY WITH BARA 

Monroe Salisbury has been engaged by 
The Fox Film Co. to support Theda Bars 
in her forthcoming production on tbe 
coast. 



LASKY EMPLOYEES GIVE $75,000 

Following closely the announcement 
that the Famous Players-Lasky Corpora- 
tion, through the chairman of its finance 
committee, Frederic G. Lee, has subscribed 
$100,000 to the Liberty Loan, there comes 
the news from Hollywood that the em- 
ployees of tbe Lasky Studio have already 
purchased $75,000 worth of bonds, thus 
adding to the patriotic action of the giant 
producing concern itself, their own sub- 
stantial tribute to the great cause over 
which the nation is now at war. 

Another substantial demonstration of 
the patriotic zeal of the Laskyites is to 
be found in the remarkably efficient Home 
Guard unit which has been organized 
among the Lasky players and studio 
workers. The Lasky Home Guard com- 
prises an Infantry company of 125 men, 
a band of 30 pieces, a Signal Corps Unit 
and two Machine Gun Sections. It is 
under the command of Cecil B. De Milk-. 



SCHERTZINGER DIRECTS RAY 

Director Victor Schertzinger, with 
Charles Ray and Sylvia Bremer, and a 
company of twenty people, returned to 
Culver City this week, from Felton, Cal., 
where they have filmed tbe principal scenes 
of "Sudden Jim," by Clarence Kelland, in 
which Thomas H. luce will present Kay as 
a star. A trestle, nine hundred feet long 
and eighty feet high, in places, which had 
been abandoned by a lumber camp, was 
turned over to the Triangle-Ince players 
for destruction. 



WOMAN BECOMES DIRECTOR 

Mrs. George E. Wyre has been named 
successor to Louis Hooper as casting di- 
rector of the Metro studio. Mr. Hooper 
Bevers his connection with the studio so 
that he can go to Canada and enlist under 
the British flag. His successor is the 
widow of George A. Wyre, a brilliant 
lawyer, and at one time assistant district 
attorney of Rockland county. 



PENNA. TAX IS BEATEN 

Reports from HarriBburg, Pa., tend to 
show that tbe legislative committee on the 
proposed film tax of 1 cent a foot on film 
product, is beaten. It is expected the 
measure, which would have meant a $700,- 
000 annual increase of taxation in Penn- 
sylvania, will not be reported out. 



HILLYER IS DIRECTOR NOW 

Director Lambert HiUyer began work on 
Olive Thomas' second starring vehicle 
under the Triangle-Ince banner. Hlllyer is 
the sutbor of the story, as well as tbe 
director. Charles Gunfl has been selected 
as the leading male character. 



SHOW "TODAY" TOMORROW 

The super feature "To-day," produced by 
Harry Rapf, will have its first private 
showing to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock 
at the Rialto Theatre. 




WILLIAM A. BRADY, Director-General. 

Brady-International Service 

WORLD-PICTURES 

Present 

SUSAN GRANDAISE 

THE SWEETEST GIRL IN EUROPE 

"A NAKED SOUL" 

EH roc tod by LouU Mercanton 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



Chart No. 4 June 6. 1*17 

A REVIEW OF REVIEWS 

FROM TRADE CRITICISMS 

Compiled by THE NEW YORKf CLIPPER 

Cut out this chart and paste in scrap book for reference. Use our list of releases as an index. 


1 


Name of Film 


CLIPPER 


WORLD 


NEWS 


TELEGRAPH 


TRADE REVIEW 


"THE JAGUAR'S 
CLAWS" 

Mexican border drama. 
Lasky five reels. Re- 
leased Jane 11 by Para- 
mount. Featuring Sessue 
Hayakawa. 


"It is a real feature, 
and good for the entire 
run. Sessue Hayakawa 
once again proves himself 
to be one of our very best 
screen actors. 


"A vastly entertaining 
melodrama with a strong, 
healthy kick in it" 
(Issue June 16.) 


"Better than average 
because of fine work by 
Mr. Hayakawa. The 
climax was very weak." 
(Issue June 16.) 


"Entertaining in its 
action and has moreover 
one excellent cHon ar- 
tistically done." 

(Issue June 3.) 


"A zestfuL stirring 
melodrama that arrests 
attention. The support- 
ing cast is unusually cap- 
able." 

(Issue June 9.) 


2 


"SUBMARINE EYE" 

Drama. Williamson 
Bros. State rights. Di- 
rected by Winthrop 
Kelly. 


"Embodies about all 
the known elements that 
go to make a success of 
any dramatic entertain- 
ment." 


"The story * • • is 

necessarily much broken 

— more attracted by the 

submarine photography." 

(Issue June 16.) 


"A picture that will 
stand the exigencies of 
time without losing in- 
terest. Dull moments are 
conspicuous because of 
their absence." 

(Issue June 16.) 


"A film which might be 
called the eighth wonder 
of the picture world." 
(Issue June 3.) 


"Fascinating and thril- 
ling. Nothing can be 
found lacking that would 
increase its entertaining 
qualities." 

(Issue June 9.) 


3 

• 
■ 


"A DOLL'S HOUSE" 

Drama. Bluebird. Five 
reels. Released June 11. 
Featuring Dorothy Phil- 
lips. Director : Joseph 
De Grasse. 


"Skillfully handled and 
admirably presented. Fur- 
nishes entertainment of 
the highest character." 


"Prepared with intel- 
ligence and the screen is 
able to tell the story 
clearly and concisely." 
(Issue June 16.) 


"A dramatically fine 
piece of work in every 
respect Distinctly apart 
from the usual five reel 
photoplay." 

(Issue June 16.) 


"Follows the play 
closely and difficult as it 
was to visualize — the in- 
terest never flags and is 
sustained to the end." 
(Issue June 3.) 


"Patrons will probably 
accord a warm welcome 
to the feature. Prom- 
ises to provide a good at- 
traction." 

(Issue June 9.) 


4 


"CALL OF HER 
PEOPLE" 

Drama — Metro. Seven 
reels. Special release. 
Starring Ethel Barry- 
more. Director: J. W. 
Noble. 


"Decidedly interesting 
from every angle. Splen- 
didly stage and directed." 


"Has been admirably 
adapted to the screen." 
(Issue June 16.) 


"The big moments of 
the picture failed to regis- 
ter effectively and some of 
them even drew laughs 
in place of gasps." 
(Issue June 16.) 


"One of Metro's most 
elaborate features. In- 
teresting by its story 
force." 

(Issue June 3.) 


"Highly commendable. 
Is distinctly in the class 
of special offerings." 
(Issue of June 9). 


5 


"THE FALSE 
FRIEND" 

Melodrama — World. 
Five reels. Released Jane 
11. Featuring Robert 
Warwick and Gail Kane. 
Director: Harry Daven- 
port. 


"The audience will sit 
on the edge of its chairs 
watching this picture." 


"Commands attention 
by force of its numerous 
complications and physi- 
cal action." 

(Issue June 16.) 


"It can be relied upon 
as a sure-fire entertain- 
ment for Mr. Brady's 
usual audiences." 
(Issue Jane 16.) 


"Makes up in vigor for 
what it lacks in original- 
ity. The names of the 
two stars are the pic- 
ture's biggest asset." 
(Issue June 3.) 


"Fulfills all that could 
be asked from a melo- 
dramatic standpoint." 
(Issue June 9.) 


6 


"THE SILENT 
MASTER" 

Modern Drama — Selz- 
nick. Six and a half 
reels. Starring Robert 
Warwick. Director: 
Leonce Perret. 


"Is a record of episodes 
and the big ideas are. 
buried. Wonderful scenic 
effects will prove very in- 
teresting." 


"An especially attrac- 
tive moving picture melo- 
drama." 

(Issue June 16.) 


"An unusual produc- 
tion. The life of the 
Apache is unmistakably 
reflected with striking 
correctness." 

(Issue June 16.) 


"It lacks the touch of 
imaginativeness that 
would have made it a 
success. The illusion of 
romance and adventure 
are lost" 

(Issue June 3.) 


"May be recommended 
as having some value as 
an attraction, though the 
impression is that the 
material has been drawn 
out beyond its natural 
length." 

(Issue June 9.) 


7 


"MAGNIFICENT 
MEDDLER" 

Western Drama — Vita- 
graph. Five reels. Re- 
leased June 4. Featuring 
Antonio Moreno. Di- 
rector: William Wolbert. 


"Is a Western story of 
the old-time thriller type. 
Antonio Moreno wins ad- 
miration." 


"An entertaining story 
• * * acted with an 
amount of dash and skill 
that makes it doubly 
worth- while." 

(Issue June 16.) 


' "A most pleasing pic- 
ure. Gets many a laugh 
and many a thrill." 
(Issue June 16.) 


"An excellent hour's 
entertainment. May be 
booked satisfactorily in 
any class of theatre." 
(Issue Jane 3.) 


"A thoroughly enter- 
taining and somewhat 
sensationally thrilling 
photoplay. Is entirely 
worthy of the exhibitors' 
attention." 

(Issue June 9.) 


8 


"GREAT WHITE 
TRIAL" 

Drama — Whartons. 
Seven reels. State rights. 
Featuring Doris Kenyon 
and Thomas Holding. Di- 
rected by Leopold B. 
Wharton. 


Worthy of the reputa- 
tion of the Whartons as 
producers of exceptional 
pictures. A picture of 
the highest quality. 


(Review not available 
to date.) 

(Issue June 16.) 


"A well done melo- 
dramatic picture. Will 
instantly awaken the in- 
terest of the majority of 
picturegoers." 

(Issue June 16.) 


"Solid melodrama pro- 
duced after a tried-and- 
true pattern, with all the 
earmarks of a substantial 
success. Is as refreshing 
. as a sleigh ride." 

(Issue June 3.) 


"Abounds in thrilling 
episodes, smoothly con- 
nected, splendidly staged 
and absolutely certain to 
win the favor of all ad- 
mirers of romantic ad- 
venture." 

(Issue June 9.) 





The Two Best 

Bets of the 

Week 



DOROTHY PHILLIPS 

BLUEBIRD STAR 
la Henri* Ibsen's Dramatic Masterpiece 

"A Doll's House" 




June 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



"THE SUBMARINE EYE" 

Williamson Brother/. 
Cast 

PBOLOGUE 

Marcel Lupin Fred HadcUffe 

Denis de Fontenelle Lillian Cook 

Monsieur de Fontenelle E. Hudson 

MAIN THEME 

John Fulton, Chester Barnett 

Captain Bob IAndsey Hall 

Joe Lee Charles Hartley 

Nancy Edith Conway 

Dorothy Morgan Barbara Tennant 

Cyrus Morgan Charles Blattery 

Parker Nell Blattery 

Earl of IAnwaod Eric Mayne 

Murphy Edward Butler 

An officer of the Condor, 

Gustavo Fischer 

Bullcr By Himself 

Stoiy — By J. Ernest Williamson. 
Director — Winthrop Kelly. 
Photographed — By Harold Sintzenich. 
Action — Plentiful. 
Continuity — Excellent. 
Suspense — Inten se. 
Detail — Superb. 
Atmosphere — Excellent. 
Photography — Magnificent. 

Remarks. 

In the "Submarine Eye" the Williamson 
Brothers have given the screen a produc- 
tion, tbe excellence of which will be more 
and more appreciated as greater numbers 
of people see the picture. 

Not only is tbe feature remarkable 
through its mysteriously thrilling under- 
water scenes, but the production, as a 
whole, embodies about all the known ele- 
ments that go to make a success of any 
dramatic entertainment. None of us ever 
become too old to be interested in tales of 
adventure and lost treasure. The sea, and 
more particularly, its mysterious depths, 
has a fascination for every one. Romance, 
to a greater or less degree, attracts all. 

The story in brief tells of a chest of 
gold placed upon an uninhabited island, 
which is later found by a sea captain, 
who, in turn, loses it at sea. Years later, 
a young inventor of an instrument known 
as "The Submarine Eye" succeeds in in- 
teresting his fiancee's father in financing 
an expedition to search for the lost treas- 
ure, using his invention. All sorts of ad- 
ventures are encountered both on land 
and on the floor of tbe sea, resulting in 
many thrilling scenes. 

Box Office Value. 

The full run. 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"THE GIRL, GLORY" 

Ince-Kay Bee. Five Reels. 
Released June 10 by Triangle. 

Cast 

Glory Wharton Enid Bennett ' 

Jed Wharton. Walt Whitman 

Bruce Crawford William Warters 

Sally Barton Margery Bennett 

"Sport' Morgan Darren Foss 

Jake Morgan J. P. Lockney 

Story— Drama. Written bv C. Gardner 

Sullivan. Directed by R. Win. Neill. 

Featuring Enid Bennett. 
Action — Interesting. 
Continuity— Consistent. 
Suspense — Very little. 
Detail— Good. " 
Atmosphere— Convincing. 
Photography — Good . 

Remarks. 

Here is a story of a young orphan girl 
who dotes on her grandfather, a drunkard. 
There is only one saloon in the town, the 
proprietor of which lives up to the law 
forbidding a girl drinking in the place. 

By a subterfuge she gets into a room 
off the barroom and pretends to be drunk. 

The saloon man loses his license and the 
grandfather promises never to drink again. 
Incidentally, a young minister wins the 
girl's love. 

While there are no tense moments and no 
suspense, tbe simple story 1b appealing and 
holds interest. The direction and acting 
are good. Miss Bennett's charming per- 
sonality has much to do with making the 
picture worth while. 

Box Office Value. 

One day. 



"THE FALSE FRIEND" 

World. Five reels. 

Released June 11. 

Cast 

William Ramsdell Robert Wartoiok 

Virginia Farrell Gail Kane 

Robert FarreU Jack Drumier 

De Witt Clinton '. . .Earl Sohenck 

J. Carlton Clinton B. J. Rolloto 

Byron Louis Edgard 

Marietta Pinna Nesbit 

Story— By Florence C, Bolles. Directed 

by Harry Davenport. Photographed by 

Philip Hatkin. 
Action — Too much. 
Continuity — All right. 
Suspense— Strained. 
Detail — Very fine. 
Atmosphere — Correct. 
Photography — Excellent. 

Remarks. 

The audience will sit on the edge of its 
chairs watching this picture. In the end, 
however, the overtax on its sympathy and 
the long strain of worry imposed upon it 
by multiplied acts of villainy in the picture, 
will outbalance the interest tbe film ex- 
cites. 

An evil creature blackmails the .butler 
into drugging the drink of his rival in 
love. The basis of the blackmail, a murder 
committed by the butler largely under the 
coercion of a trickster, is flimsy, for it 
is apparent the hireling could have betrayed 
the trickster as easily as tbe latter could 
betray him. 

Having drugged the rival, however, the 
conspirators plant a drug outfit on the 
victim. Then the trickster easily captures 
the girl's consent to marriage, and does 
marry her. This shouldn't happen. 

Way out in the mountain, a year later, 
all tbe characters meet again by wild coin- 
cidence. The girl surrenders her revived 
love to the forgotten sweetheart a little too 
readily. Finally the butler confesses all 
the hideous facts of the past. The villain 
is killed and everything ends happily. 

There are lots of fine scenes in the film. 

Box Office Value. 
Worth the full run. 



"THE CIRCUS OF LIFE" 

Butterfly. Five Reels. 

Released June 4 by Universal. 

Cast. 

Danny Pomeroy Cannon 

Mamie Elsie Jane Wilson 

Bouvais Harry Carter 

Kate Mignon Anderson 

Tommie Emory Johnson 

George Bertram Bertram Grassby 

Daisy May .' Zoe Rae 

Story — Dramatic. Written by E. J. Claw- 
son. Directed by Rupert Julian. Fea- 
turing Pomeroy Cannon and Elsie Jane 
Wilson. 
Action — Has interest. 
Continuity — Fairly consistent. 
Suspense — Well sustained. 
Detail— O. K. 
Atmosphere — Good. 
Photography — Good . 

Remarks, 

A young couple of the working classes, 
together with their child and a tempera- 
mental artist, form the pivot on which this 
story revolves. 

While there is strong interest, at times, 
in this picture, the author, with the evident 
intention of stretching the story to the full 
five reels, devotes too much attention to 
side issues which develop little and serve 
to break the continuity of the real story. 

The acting is excellent. Pomeroy Can- 
non makes a fine type of husband, and 
Miss Wilson is all that can be desired 
as the wife. The real star of the picture, 
however, is little Zoe Rae. She is one of 
our very best actresses among the kiddies 
on the screen. Her work in this picture 
has rarely been excelled. 

Box Office Value. 
Good for full run. 



"THE SILENT MASTER" 

Selznick. Six and a naif reels. 

Open Booking. 

Cast 

Marquis de Somlreuil. . . .Robert Warwick 

Marquise de SombreuU Olive Tell 

Eugene Arlen Donald Galaher 

Jaqueline Anna Little 

Juliette Juliette Moore 

Le Beau Robert Henri Talbel 

Mrs. Garlingford Valentine Petit 

Mr. Garlingford George Clark 

Story — Melodrama. Taken from the storv 
"The Court of St. Simon," by E. Phil- 
lips Oppenheim. Featuring Robert War- 
wick and Olive Tell. Directed by 
Leonce Perret. 
Action — Rather jerky. 
Continuity — Full of gaps. 
Su spense— Strong. 
Detail— Good. 
Atmosphere — Rieh. 

Photography— Good. 

Remarks. 

There are about four separate and dis- 
tinct stories crammed into this film. Tbe 
production, therefore, is a record of epi- 
sodes, and the big ideas are buried. 

The Marquis de SombreuU, a wealthy 
nobleman, is secret head of an Apache 
band. He causes the underworld scoundrels 
to kidnap wealthy persons. He arraigns 
these victims in a mysterious court. 

The Marquis, in a whimsical mood, per- 
mits an immature American youth, Eugene 
Arlen, to see the workings of his under- 
world court and followers. The boy, him- 
self, falls into crime. The Marquis, 
meantime, goes to America and marries 
the sister of the boy he has unwittingly 
led into evil ways. Illogical twists fol- 
low the wife's discovery of De Sombreuil's 
past. 

Box Office Value. 

Worth usual run. 



"MAGNIFICENT MEDDLER" 

Vitagraph. Five Seels. 

Released June 4 by V. L. S. B. 

Cast 

Montague Emerson Antonio Moreno 

Bob Gill, cartoonist Otto Lederer 

Jess Roth Mary A nderson 

Pete Marillo '. Leon D. Kent 

Story — Drama by Lawrence AlcCloskey. 

Williams Wolliert, director. 
Action— Interesting. 
Continuity — Even. 
Suspense— (tripping. 
Detail— Fair. 
Atmosphere — Good. 
Photography — Hood. 

Remarks. 

"The Magnificent Meddler" is a Western 
story of tbe old time thriller type. All 
tbe old melodramatic tricks are there — 
cunning Mexican, in league with corrupt 
politician, kidnapping, chase by the hero, 
who is doing uplift work. 

Montague Emerson buys a newspaper in 
a town called Hoizen, and starts to clean 
up tbe town. He has the support of tbe 
business element, but tbe corrupt section 
bitterly oppose him. One of the latter la 
the father of the girl he falls in love with, 
but all is righted in the end, father giving 
in to all demands, when daughter de- 
nounces him. 

Box Office Value 

Full run. 



FILM AROUSES INTEREST 

The Master Drama Features, Inc., of 
1493 Broadway, report the receipt of 
scores of inquries from film distributors 
for information on "Who's Your Neighbor," 
which the company has. announced for early 
release. 

The film is a seven-part drama treating 
of sociological questions in a vigorous way. 
It was written by Willard Mack, and is 
directed by S. Rankin Drew, who departed 
on completion of the picture, to serve 
with the American ambulance corps in 
France. 



'TtetfiiTmoPie soMeat 
[fondtedaffimed aiimi/ 

Julius Sreger prints -**""*« v " lM * 



MlSftllf 

KDEMFTION" 

A Photo Drama from Life 
L DepJcred v/'itfi RelenHessTrutr. 



Directed by Julius Siegers Joseph A Golden 
flew playing af 6K).nC0HAHS THEATRE IWforrf af fr scale 




"Courageous Womanhood — strong appeal." — N. Y. Times. 
"Exhibitors will do four times the business." — N. Y. Evening Journal. 
"A Surprise — a Revelation." — Aferm'iig Telegraph. 
"Almost crushed into a pulp, trying to get into the theatre." — Rev. 
Thomas B. Gregory, N. Y. American. 

"Box Office Magic A certainty for State Right Buyers." — Motion 
Picture News. 

"Many worthy folk will approve and enjoy it."— Motion Picture World. 
• " "Flaying to capacity at every performance." — Variety. 

"A veritable sensation."— Sew York Star. 

for flafe Bi§h& apply lb Juife 524 tpnfrcreBld&. HYC 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 6, 1917 



WANTED 

FOR R. T. RICHARDS 

SUPREME SHOW OF THE WORLD 



Performers in various branches, Novelty Acts, 
Riders, Clowns, Acrobats. 

ADDRESS ALL THIS WEEK, TROY, N. Y. 




BACHMANN'S CONCERT ORCHESTRA 



Late of Panama Exposition, San Francisco. At liberty for Young's Pier, Atlantic City; 
hotels, parks, cafes, summer resorts and theatrical Vork. Agents communicate. Address 
MAX BACH.MANN. Musical Director, IMS W. 12th St., Chicago, 111. 



DR. JULIAN SIEGEL, the Theatrical Dentist 



Suite 34 PUTNAM BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



Phone Bryant stSZ 



EXCEPTIONAL RATES TO THE PROFESSION 



FEENEY, MANNING S KNOLL 



New Act by JOHN P. MEDBURY. 



Direction TOM JONES 



Tenney 



The vaudeville writer of vaudeville** beat acts, sketches and mono- 
logues. If you owe yourself a good act, better let me write it for 
you now. 

ALLEN SPENCER TENNEY. 1493 Broadway, New York. 



AT LIBERTY FOR SUMMER AND COMING SEASON 
HAL C. WOR.TH LENORE 



leads. Jurenllej. Light Comedy. Age, 27; 160 Da.; 
bright. 5 ft. 11 in. 

Single snd Doable Specialties. Wardrobe, exptrleoa. amity. Stock. Sep.. One Piece. 
Join on vlre. Address HAL C. WOKTH, 1725 Sorts 12th St. 



IofrosM ud Second Business. Are, 23; height 

4 ft. 5 In.; 115 lba. 

Besoonslble miasm only. 
Skiissisis. WIscsssls. 



T fT' FTAICtFrFa? IHEATRICAl UPHOLSTERING 

♦£-* • a t >» M. /^IJl—ilX IN All TTS BRANCHES 

Repairing Box Springs. Mattresses, Cushions, Slip Covers, etc This is a specialty 
with us. 41 W. «5(h Si. NEW YORK Telephone, Bryant 1677. 

TWELVE YEARS SUMMER AND WINTER 

Happy Lod Whitney Stock Company Wants 

Mao and woman for heavies and characters; only congenial people who have wardrobe and can 
act wanted. State all lowest salary. Pa, own. WELSH AND WALBOURNE, Alma, Mich., 
Week June 4; Be ling, Mich., June 11. " 

MADDOCK'S PARK PLAYERS WANTED AT ONCE 

Singing and dancing sketch team, or man and woman, and good single, that can 
change. Long engagement to right people. Gussie and Joe wire. FRANK L. 
HADDOCKS, Care Gilbert Hotel, Richmond, Va. 



MADISONS' BUDGET No. 16 

Is the model publication of rauderille and Its 
allied branches and contain. James Madison's 
beet original material. Including 12 monologues. 
8 acts for 2 males. 7 for male and female. 4 
minstrel first-parts, a number of erackerjack 
parodies, a tabloid farce, besides hundreds of 
sure-are gaga. etc. Price one dollar. Send 
orders to JAJCES afArHBOS, 1052 Third Are- 
na*. N.w York. 



WaANTED— PARTNER 

for Repertoire Co., have scripts, scenery, 
paper, cuts. Also scripts for sale cbeap. 
CHARLES KYLE, 1» Winthrop Avenue, New 

H»ven, Cosnn. 

Wanted: Twenty Thousand Dollars 



UP-TO-DATE SONGS FOR SALE 

Old Glory— Mother's Day— We Are 
Ready, Uncle Sam — The Spirit of 1917 — 
One and All for the U. S. A.— There's a 
little Girl at Home That Waits for Me— 
When the Mysterious Aviator Flies O'er 

the Sea— For America You Must Fight- 
Well Be Loyal and True— Stand by the 
President — Girls Are Hard to Understand 
—Fighting for U. S. A. and You— When 
My Little Sister Steals My Best Bean's 
Heart Away — Your Eyes Make Me Think 
of Ireland — America's Battle Cry — Your 
Country Needs You, Volunteers — The 
Nuptial Night — Go Enlist in the Service 
Today— When Bill Fell Out With Uncle 
Sam — The Stars and Stripes of My Coun- 
try— I'd Like to Hear the Band Play 
Swanee River — For Dear Old America — 
Uncle Sam's Reply— Lift Up the Flag— 
111 Tell You All About It When I Get 
Back— The Glorious Flag— Three Cheers 
for Our Flag, the Red, White and Blue — 
Cheer Up, Mother— Let Us All Be True 
to the Red, White and. Blue — Help Pro- 
tect the Red, White and Blue— Fling Out 
the Banner— Jeweled Hours of the Past 
— Sons of Uncle Sam — Your Country 
Calls — Be Up and Doing, Do It Now — I 
Would Ride With the Man in the Moon 
— Happy Little Sunshine Sue — Come 
Boys, Join the Army — The Story the White 
Rose Told— We Are the Boy Scouts — 
Dancing the Overlanding Leu — Along 
Come3 the Yankee Soldier— Old Glory. 
BRENNEN, 1433 Broadway. New York 



on first mortgage. Security on land. 
M11HS, GlanvHIa, aCna. 



CLYDE 



FIRST TO WIN 

auccess is the performer who has up-to- 
date vaudeville Comedy Material, the 
kind that* a la 

THE NEW No. 2 

McNALLY'S BULLETIN 

Everything New, Bright and Original 
PRICE Sl.OO 

HoHALLTS BuT.T.FTnf Ho. S contains 
IT SCnZASmrO KOHOLOQTJES. for He- 
brew, Irish, Black and White Pace. Dutch, 
Tramp, Wop. Female and Stump Speech. 

10 GBEAT ACTS TOE TWO KALES. Each 
act an applause winner. 

» SOARING ACTS FOE KALE AHD FE- 
sT AT.F The y'll make good on any bill. 

82 STTEE-rrEE PARODIES. On all of 
Broadway's latest Song Hits. 

A COMEDY SKETCH. Entitled "ANXIOUS 
TO GET RICH." Ifs the FUNNIEST 
SKETCH In Vaudeville. 

s. mT.T. va MERRY aUHBT&ELS. Con- 
sisting of six corking FIRST PARTS, end- 
ing with a screimlcg Finale. "NOT 
GOTXTY." 

A TABLOID COMEDY AHD BUBXESftUE, 
entitled "IT'S YOUR WIFE"; also hun- 
dreds of Crosa-Flre Gags and Jokes sad 
additional Comedy Surprises. Remember 
the price of McNALLY'S BULLETIN No. 
2 1* only ONE dollar per copy, wttb 
money-back guarantee. 

WM. McNALLY, 81 E. 125th St., New York 



"The Theatrical 
Route" 

Comfortable steamers leave New 
York, Pier 32, N. R., foot Canal 
St. 6.00 P.M., West 132d St. 6.30 
P.M. daily, including Sunday; also 
Sunday morning at 9.30 for Al- 
bany, Troy and the North. 

Save money 
Travel in comfort 

HUDSON NAVIGATION COMPANY 



MAUD MASSEY VAN BERGEN 

l_»dv Director el Orchestra. De Luxe Cafe, 
Chicago. 




Will be the rage from ocean to ocean — the Patriotic Slot 

Sure We Are Some Big America ! 



To Singers and Orchestra Leaden: Piano Bean— words 
Bene and taehettn tloe complete for 25c. No time 
jrofeadonal copies. Money back for the asking. 
■UIY wsLFE, rsk., Samsssri. Pa. 



JOE NATHAN'S WILL IS FILED 

The will of the late Joseph S. Nathan, 
musical composer, has been filed for probate 
in the Surrogate's Court- By its terms the 
testator's widow, Dorothy Nathan, is made 
sole legatee and executrix. 

VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(Continued from page 27.) 

jamesvtxle. wis. 

Appalls (Last Half)— Jas. & Dot. Palmer— 
Planoaong Poor. - - 

MASON CITY, IOWA, 

Cecil (Last Hair) — Exposition Four — Cooper A 
Hlckey. 

MARSHALLTOWir, 1A. 
Casino (Last Half) — Orrin Craig Trio— Ray A 
Marlon — Worden'a Birds — Al. Wohlman — HaU A 
Gilds. 

ST. CLOUS, MINN. 
Memo (One Dsy)— The Msrrendas — Rem! Duo— 
Rogers A Mack — Cooper A Hlckey — Sorority Girls. 

POU CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 
Poll (First Half)— Dalbeanle A Co.— Norton A 
AUen — Joe Bernard A Co. — Barns A Qulnn— 
"Story land." (Last Half)— BIckxeH— Crater & 
Ben— Gygt A Vadle— Al Shame — Loin Beeson a 
Co. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Palace (First Half)— Selgle A Matthews— Con- 
ners A Foley — Al Shayne — Graser A Ben. (Last 
Half)— Two Little Days— C. V. B. A. Poor. 

PoU (First Half) — Lilette — Elk-Ins Fay A Elklos. 
(Last Half)— Walter Ward & Useless— John T. 
Clark — Jimmy Lucas ft Co. — "Storyland." 

HEW HAVEN, CONN. 
Bijou (Plrst Half)— Two Little Days — Gygl A 
Vadl— Elm City Four— Lulu Beeson A Co. (Lsst 
Half) — Dalbeanle A Co. — Alton A Allen — Bice A 
Werner — Bums A Quln — "Dream Fantasies." 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

Plaza (First Half) — Waiter-? Ward A Useless- 
John J. Clsrk — C. T. B. A. Poor. (Last Half)— 
Lilette— Elklns Fay A EUtlns. 

PoU (First Half)— Jlmmie Lucas A Co.— 
"Dream Fantasies." (Lsst Hslf) — Connors ft 
Foley — Joe Bernard & Co. — Jasper. 



and 
for 



COMPANY ROUTES 

(Ctmrinurd from page 29.) 

BURLESQUE 

Colombia Circuit 

Hastings' Big Show — Casino. Brooklyn, 4-9; 
- Columbia, Chicago. 15. lndef. 

Hip, Hip, Hooray Girls — Columbia, New- 
York, 21, lndef. 

Liberty Girls— Cleveland. 28. lndef. 

Williams. Mollie — Empire. Brooklyn, 4-9; 
Casino, Brooklyn, 11-16. 

American Circuit 

Record Breakers — Standard, St. Louis. 4-9 : 
Manlon's Garden, St. Louis, 11, lndef. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Ripley's Picture * Yaude. Show — New Wood- 
stock, N. Y-. 4-9: Demster, 11-10. 

Nash-Townley Co. 

Featuring Charlotte Mayate Claire. Want 2 single ntec 
not ortr 30 who can play parts and do specialties, or 
double In band. Stale lowest sun salary. Other people 
doing 3 or pore, special ties write. Long engagement rasr- 
anteed. S. F. SASH, afar.. Warsaw. III. 

RICHARD LLOYD 

AT LIBERTY JUNE 
Age 28, height 5-11, weight 180 lbs. Versatile 
general business actor. Strong specialty — 
songs and whistling. Appearance on and off. 
Ticket? Yes. General Delivery, Alma, Mich. 
After June 10, Revere House, Chicag o, 111. 

AX LIBERTY 

COMEDIAN 
First class wardrobe, all essentials, 
play any line; good appearance and 
good specialties. Scripts. MILLER, 
250 W. Exchange, Akron, Ohio. 

NOTICE 

To people engaged with the Mack-Guy, 

attraction 
Opening pottpoc&ed indefinitely on account of 
wreck of four trucks during their transports* 
tion to opening town. C C. GUY, Worthin-j- 
ton. lad. ' 

WANTED FOR 

"American Musical Revue" 

Dramatic people that can sing and good 
comedian sister teams. Chorus girls. All 
state age, height, weight and lowest salary. 
Address by mail only, AMERICAN MUSI- 
CAL REVUE, Hotel Kexford, Boston, Mass 

LAYS, SKETCHES WRITTEN 

Terms for a stamp 

E. I_ GAMBLE, Playwright, 

East Liverpool, O. 



ACTS 



lune 6, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



JOHN BRUNTON STUDIOS 

Productions of Every Description 

For Public, Private, Profeaaional and Non-Professional Performance! 

SCENERY, PROPERTIES, STAGE FURNISHINGS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Telephone: Bryant 59 1 4 226 WEST 4IST STREET, NEW YORK 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Books for borne 
amusement, Negro Flays, Paper, Scenery, Mrs. .farter's Wax 
Works. Catalogue Free! Free! Free! 

SAMUEL FRENCH, 2s West 31th St.. New York 



ftwraflffi 



^BBTtrIi^dtobUILT 




TAYLOR'S 

No. 2 

CIRCUS 

SPECIAL 

TRUNK 

This trunk has 
improve men ta 

that will bs 

sure to Interest 
yoo. Guaran- 
teed nos-leax- 
for a rood 



■and for roll particulars and our NBW 
1S17 C AIAIyOwTJB. 

C A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 
•71 N. Hatotaa St, Chicago, IB. 
HI W. 4Mb St, New York. N. Y. 



THEATRES AND PRODUCTIONS, 
VAUDEVILLE ACTS EQUIPPED 

New and Second Hand Scenery fas Stock 

MURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO 

Columbia Theatre Brag, 47tb * Broadway 
Tel. Bryant 1243 Tom Creamer, Mgr. 





OFFICIAL 
DOCTOR 


N. 


V.A. 


Dr. 


William H. Goldberg 




S3 WEST (3rd STREET 


Tel. 5*28 Schuyler 




NEW YORK 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, $S.OO 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Also a few 
Second Hand Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunks, $10 and $15. A few extra large 
Property Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunks 
and Bal Trunks. 
Parlor Floor, 28 W. Slat St, New York dty 



U1alk L « 



•all colors. Entire cetBoan- 1 
*«t fitted in 24 hms. ' 



155^ BUUfly 



6659 Bryant 

MOVING PICTURE and DRAMATIC 
-INSTRUCTION] 

SOCIETY FILM INSTRUCTION COMPANY 

offers free try-out to those possessingfcjlent 
desirous of entering profession. E- COOPER 
WILLIS, Director, 247 W. 42nd St, Now York. 



MAGIC' 



I ACTS FOB bat.w CHEAP. We 
Buy, Sen or atxeaange need 

' Apparatus, Professional Cata- 
log 10c. Parlor Tries catalog FRRB. Write or 
Call. Hornman Magic Co.. 8ta. 1, 470 8th At., K.Y. 



TONIGHT BILLS 

Ose side Two Sides 

5.000 4x12 ToeUhten 36.00 38.00 

10,000 4x12 Tonigbters 9.00 11.50 

15,000 4sl» Toaigalers 11.50 14.50 

20,000 4112 Tonlghtrts 13.50 17.50 

30.000 4il2 Tonlgnters 20.00 22.50 

(6s» size same price as 4il2 In quantities ss 
abrte slated) 

5,000 3x8 Tonlgbten 5.50 7.00 

10.000 3x8 Tttolcbters 8.50 10 50 

15.000 3x8 Trjalghters 10.00 13.00 

20.000 3x8 Toolghters 12.50 15.50 

30.000 3xS Tonlihters 17.50 20.00 

(On orders of 30,000 snd over of Toolgut Bills, either 
one, two. three or six different styles, evenly divided. 
may be had il no additional tost. One-side Tonlghters 
hating on them the ran and synopsis of plays nil he 
charred for at the two-side rate.) For other theatrical 
printing send for price list. Route book, samples, etc.. 
lOe. In stamps. Owing to unsettled market conditions all 
prices sub]ert to change without notlte. THE GAZETTE 
SHOW PRINTING CO.. -attoti. Illliwli. Terms: Cash 
with order. 

TIGHTS 

Cotton Tights, very good quality, 
a pair 90c Worsted Tights, 
medium weight. $2.00 a pair. 
Worsted Tights, besvy weight. 
$2.75 s pair. Imported auk 
plaited tiibta. In bright Bed snd 
golden Brown, only $2.50 a 
pair. ailkollne Tights h) all 
colors. $2.50 a pair. Heavy 73 
per cent. Imported atlt tlgbss. 
In bright red only, reduced from 
$4.00 to $4.00 a pair, rail 
sleeve Shlrti to match tignta. 
same price as tights. Orders 
ailed promptly. Clipper Catalog 
free on application. 

BERNARD tVf>VNDL 

210-212 W. MADISON ST. CHICAGO. ILL 




B B & B Special 

Wardrobe Trunk 

5 Ply Fibre Covered 
Chicago: Marshall Field & Co. $45.00 



Send for Catalogue 



B B 4k B TRUNK CO., 



Pittsburg, Pa. 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS. ETC 
N. Y. PLAY BUREAU, Tre- 
mont Theatre, N. Y. City. 

Stamp for catalog. 



NEW DROPS, $10.00 

Painted to Order. Any size up to 15x20 feet 
in either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colors. 
$2.00 deposit with each order. Scholia Scenic 
Studio, Columbus, O. 



MAX ROGERS AGENCY 

Now at 1S62 Broadway 

WANTS NOVELTY ACTS FOR 

CABARET 

NOW READY 

THE | CUPPER 
RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

For Season 1916-1917 

It contains the names and addresses of Man- 
agers, Vaudeville and Dramatic Agents in New 
tork, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh, San Francisco, Canada; Music Pub- 
lishers; Theatrical dubs and Societies; Mov- 
ing Picture Firms, and other information. 

Sent only on receipt of 2c stamp, accom- 

YORK clrp a pE C il aPOXl CUt fr ° m ™ NEW 



CUT OUT AND 

Send this Coupon and 2c stamp for a 

copy of 

THE CLIPPER RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 
(For l»is-ni7) 

To THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

1M Broadway. Nov York 



New Victoria Hotel 

IN NEW YORK AT broadway and 

aav ItlaM tvIUa LONG ACRE SQUARE 

145 to 155 West 47th Street 

"The Vary Heart oJ New York" 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 
350 ROOMS 250 PRIVATE BATHS 

Every Modern Convenience European Plan Exclusively 

ABE MlERS, Manager of Cafe Drop in at any time 

Single rooms, hot and cold water 1 

Single rooms, private hath $1 JO and up 

Suite, parlor, bedroom and bath $4 and up 

Suite, parlor, 2 bedrooms and bath $3 and up 

The Best 50c. Dinner in New York 

C. A. HOLLINGSWORTH New York City 





Others Succeed. Why Can't Tout 

STAGE TRAINING 

Oraaa. Csasgy, Vaiirvllli. Stan Daet- 
In an 4 Photo Day Target. Technical 
and Practical Courses. Celebrities who 
studied under Mr. Alviene: Annette Kel- 
lermann, Nora Baves. Basel Dawn, 
Joseph Saotley. Barry Plleer. 1411a. 
Daxie. Mary Fuller. Dolly Sisters. Taylor 
Holmes. Vivian Frtseott. Eleanor Painter 
and others. Write for eatalocoe men- 
tioning study desired. 

AtnasM Thestre School of Acta*, 

57th St.. at Broadway 
Entrance 225 W. 57th 81. New Tort. 



SECOND-HAND 

GO WN S 



ANDREWS. 5043 S. State St, CHICAGO 



WIGS »« BEARDS 

Its All Sty lea and Qual ities 

THEATRICAL JEWELRY AND 
SPANGLES, TIGHTS, OPERA HOSE 
AND STOCKINGS, FANCY BRO- 
CADES, VELVETS, SATINS, GOLD 
and SILVER TRIMMINGS, and all 
Good* Theatrical. 

Hi gh Grade Qualities at Lowest Prices 

CATALOGUES and SAMPLES upon re- 
quest. When asking for Catalogue, 
please mention what goods are wanted. 

SIEGM AN & WEIL 

S. W. Cor. 7th St., & Madison Ave. 
NEW YORK 

The Theatrical Supply Emporium 



Tel. 4754 Murray Hill 



Estab. 1889 



TO THE PROFESSION 

Your Furs stored and repaired during the sum- 
raer months. Many noted actors are among 
our customer*. 

O. STEINLAUF 

26 Eaat 33rd St. NEW YORK 

(Between Madison and 5th Avenue) 
Telephone Greeley 2926 

YOU CAN RENT SCENERY 

For Try Outs, for Vaudeville Acta, 



We 



C L I F» F» E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding one line in 
length will be published, properly classified, in 
this index, at the rate of $10 lor one year (S3 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while tha 
advertisement is running. 

CHEWING GUM-BAIX-CANDY COATED. 
Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factories Bldg., 
Toledo. O. 

LAWYERS. 
F. L» Boyd, Attorney, 17 N. La Salle St., 

Chicago. 
E. J. Ader, 10 South La Salle St., Chicago, Hi. 

MUSIC COMPOSED. ARRANGED. 
Chas. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
Howard Tuttle, 141 Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

581-583-585 South High St., Columbus, O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 

Wm. W. Delaney. 117 Park Row. New York. 

STAGE LIGHT EFFECTS. LAMPS 

(Bought. Sold) 

Newton Art Works. 305 W. 15th St.. New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C Goss Co.. 10 Atwater St.. Detroit. Mick. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co.. 387 Washington St.. Boa- 
ton, Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardware Co., 47 Eliot St., Bottom, 
Mass. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 
E. Walker, 309 W. 39th St., New York. 
TRANSFERS. 
I Walton, 455 W. 33d St., N. Y. 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hob son, 910 Prospect Ave., N. Y. C 

Telephone 4239 Greeley 

FIRST CLASS HALL 
FOR REHEARSALS 

436 West 38th Street 

(Near 9th Ave.) 
Suitable for reheaj-alng productions of all 
kind*. Stage, piano, ate. Terms Raasocahia. 



Try Outa, for Vaudeville 

Complete Production* 
Supply Amateurs and Stock Com- 
panies with Everything 

MILLARD E. FRANCE CO., Scenic Studios 
S4V4-SM West 38th St. New York 

Enlarged and Beautified 

MOUQUIN'S 

6th Ave., bet. 27th and 28th Sts., N. Y. 

MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC wJ» P. M. to 1 A. M. 




LET OS PROVE 
l aaad Ma, far aarn plea. 



mem 



_ IT 18 BEST. 
11* -W. attat tv,. ». Y. 



WIGS 



TOUPEES, GREASE 
PAINTS, ETC 

A. M. BUCH a CO. 

lit N. Ninth St_ Philadelphia 



NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Fall Dress, Tuxedo sad Prince Albert Suits 

LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St.. Cnicaga 

MUSIC ARRANGED 

PIANO, ORCHESTRA. Melodies written to 
song poems. W. H. NELSON, Astor Theatre 
Bldg., 1531 Broadway, N. Y. 



CHICAGO 

manuscript co 



MANUSCRIPT PLAYS. 



fHUSICAt - C O H 1 81 1 « 
'TABLOIDS. ETC. 



,31 ■*->■ CLARK ST. CmCACO-luC 



1MPORTANT.-EVERETT J. EVANtS, Cos- 

poser-Arranger, makes a specialty of writing 
music for new authors, and assists publicities*. 
Send your poems or complete songs. Estab. 
1900. Suite 505. Astor Theatre Bldg.. 45th sad 
Broadway, N. V. 



WIGS 



Homan Hair, Irish. Delta. Jew. raw. 

ea Bochrrtie or Man Draws wag. 

11.00. 11.60; Item 23c. Set,. 

T5a; Tlgnu. 85c Instant I 

Catalog free. 

Novelties, Preps. 

4« Caster ta.. R. T. 



THE TECHNICAL SUSS. rllW YOSi 



HARRY WEBER 



presents 





In a New Act by 

HERBERT AOORE 

Entitled 



fifi 





'•"iiiiiiilllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiii 



Fully Protected and Copyrighted 




0^ NEW YORK 




THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



ii J <n ;t) m in tn pg m m <v> m m n/i m i» /w nn H 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 191 



THE NEW AMERICAN "TIPPERARY"! 



& 



EDITORIAL 
PAGE OF THE 



SAN FRANCISCO 
MAY 30, 1917 



SAN^P^w©ise©=«fflfi8€^^^*^roCT 



This is 

an 

Extract from a 

Full Page 

Editorial 

in the 

San Francisco 

Call and Post 

of 

May 30th 

1917 

on 

Howard Johnson 

and 

Percy WenricKs 

Sensational Song 



« 



» 



* WHERE DO 
WE GO 
FROM HERE? 



» 



I 



"Where Do We Go From Here, 
Boys?" The New Song They're 
Marching to Today— 

By ANNIE LAURIE 
Today is Memorial Day. 
A year ago we were at peace with all 
the world. 

Today we are plunged into the very 
vortex of a world war. 

Where shall -we be, how shall we stand, 
one year from today? 

Who can say? Who is there that dares 
to even guess? 

"Where do we go from here, boys; 
Where do we go from here?" 
Have you the lilt of it in your blood 
yet? They're singing it in the enlistment 
automobiles on Market street, and down 
on Columbus avenue they've caught the 
song already. I met four young fellows 
swaggering down the middle of the side- 
walk yesterday, singing at the top of their 
voices — 

"Where do we go from here, boys; 
Where do we go from here?" 
And before I knew what I was doing I was 
marching in the best of time. 

Hark! it is the street song again. Are 

I they singing it on the warships in the bay, 

| too? "Where do we go from here, boys, 

where do we go from here?" It is the young 

men who are learning that song today and 

answering it, thousands upon thousands of 

i them, from one end of the country to the 

'other. 

"Where do we go from here, boys, 
"Where do we go from here?" 
We go on, and on to liberty, to justice, 
to freedom. 

We go on to splendor and to fame. 

We go on to brotherhood and universal 

' love— on and on through tears, through 

wounds, through agony, through perhaps 

the very gates of death itself, but on and on. 

Never back, oh, flag of the glorious 

dead — never back— but on! 

This is our pledge to those we honor on 
Memorial Day. 



{ Juttm , «-^a^. 



,1 



It Tells the 

Story 

of the 

New American 

'TIPPERARY' 9 

The Song 

the Boys 

are 

Marching to 

to-day — 

The song 

that will 

soon be on 

Everybody's 

Lips — 

Why not get 

it and sing 

it NOW 

while ifs new? 



\Af . 44*1-. 



BOSTON 

181 Tremont St. 



ST. LOUIS 
7th and Olive St*. 



-J s -i 

CHICAGO 
a O. H. Bldg. 



¥ New York 



PHILADELPHIA 

Broad & Cherry St*. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Pantages Theatre Bid*. 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1853. 



NEW YORK, JUNE 13, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No. 19 
Price, Ten Cents 



AGENTS FORM 
PROTECTIVE 

ASS'N 

COMBINE FOR MUTUAL BENEFIT 



Tbe first steps toward the formation of 
an organization composed of all tbe vaude- 
ville agents operating in big and small 
time, for the purpose of co-operation and 
mutual protection in all matters affecting 
tbe status of vaudeville agents were taken 
Monday night at a meeting held in the 
offices of the Vaudeville Managers' Pro- 
tective Association, lent to the agents for 
the evening. Approximately sixty agents, 
a majority of which .represented small 
time, were present. 

The embryo association is said to be the 
outcome of a number of events which have 
arisen within the last year. And it is 
rumored that tbe steps were taken upon 
the suggestion of the Vaudeville Managers' 
Protective Association. Color is lent to 
this report by the fact that Pat Casey, 
general representative of the latter organ- 
ization, addressed the agents at consider- 
able length, advising them as to the best 
manner in which to carry out the ideas 
which led to their being called together. 

Among the events which, it is said, 
prompted the move, was the action brought 
against Harry Fitzgerald last Pall by 
James Oliver, manager of tbe Six Tum- 
bling Demons, when he made a complaint to 
License Commissioner George H. Bell, that 
Fitzgerald had compelled him to pay more 
than the legal commission allowed to 
agents nnder the employment law which 
Commissioner Bell framed and had pushed 
through the legislature. After many ad- 
journments of hearings in the Magistrate's 
Court Fitzgerald was vindicated and the 
case dropped. 

However, tbe defense of the case en- 
tailed considerable expense, and the con- 
sensus of opinion among agents at tbe time 
was that, inasmuch as the same charge 
might be made against any other agent at 
any time, an organization for mutual pro- 
tection would be a wise move. 

A similar charge was later made against 
Charles M. Blanchard, the outcome of 
which is still undecided. Most cases of 
this type have been defeated in the 
Magistrate's Court, bnt Blanchard's was 
carried further and he was held for the 
Court of Special Sessions, where he is now 
awaiting trial. 

As a result of these cases, persons in- 
terested in vaudeville were not greatly sur- 
prised when Senator' Walters of Syracuse, 
about two months ago, introduced a bill at 
Albany amending Commissioner Bell's em- 
ployment law as to the definition of vaude- 
ville managers and agents. Cnder it 
Senator Walters proposed to extend the 
latitude and scope of operations allowed 
to agents under the present law to a degree 
that virtually made them managers of the 
acts they handled. A public hearing on 
this bill was held before Governor Whit- 
man last Wednesday, at which time 
Maurice Goodman, attorney for the Vaude- 
ville Managers' Protective Association, ap- 
peared in its behalf. - No opposition was 
made, although Commissioner Bell wrote 
(Continued on page 4.) 



NICOLAI WANTS $250 

George Nicolai, general manager of the 
International Circuit, is endeavoring to re- 
cover $250 from Morris Schlesinger, of 
Newark, which he declares is due him and 
Gus Hill as a rebate on an unexpired the- 
atre license surrendered when they gave 
up the operation of the Orpheum theatre 
in that city, last winter. 

At tbe time that Nicolai & Hill re- 
linquished the theatre, Schlesinger took it 
in hand and is said to have promised to 
return the money to them. He shortly 
afterward leased the house to a man named 
Katz who is. at present, operating it with 
stock shows. Representatives of Nicolai 
have been in Newark from time to time 
attempting to collect the money, but bave 
not been able to get Schlesinger to turn it 
over. Nicolai states he does not hold Katz 
responsible for tbe debt but that he is try- 
ing to locate where Schlesinger has any 
resources. Nicolai, when asked whether 
Katz had an International franchise for 
next season, said that the Newark man 
had not taken the matter up with him and 
that in the meantime they were looking for 
a more advantageous location in that city 
in which to book International shows. 



LOEW AFTER SOUTHERN BUSINESS 

E. A. Schiller, general manager of the 
Marcus Loew Southern Circuit of theatres, 
was in New Xork last week conferring with 
Mr. Loew regarding the Summer policy of 
the houses. This will be the first time that 
theatres in the South have been opened dur- 
ing the Summer months and Schiller, dur- 
ing his stay here, arranged with Loew to 
have exceptionally strong bills during that 
period. One big headline act from the 
two-a-day Circuits will be on each bill 
presented. 

Mr. Schiller also arranged to have Mr. 
Loew visit the South in the near future 
and look over a few available houses in the 
large cities tbere. He anticipates having 
at least six more houses next Fall. 



ADAMS SEEKS ANNULMENT 

Louis R. "Doc" Adams, a burlesque ad- 
vance agent, has instituted proceedings in 
the Supreme Court to annul his marriage 
to Marion Adams, whom he married in 
Brooklyn July 29, 1909. In his complaint 
Adams alleges that at the time of his 
marriage to the defendant be was already 
married. He alleges that he was the hus- 
band of Pearl Dayton Adams, whom he 
married in Sedalia, Mo., on June 26, 1908. 
It is alleged that this marriage was still 
in effect, and bad not been annuled, and 
therefore a plea is made for the annul- 
ment of his marriage to the defendant. 
Herman L. Roth is attorney for Adams. 

FOX SEEKING KEITH HOUSES 

A report to the effect that William Fox 
is negotiating with B. F. Albee, in an 
effort to obtain the Colonial and Alhambra 
Theatres for the showing of moving pic- 
tures during the coming Summer, was 
heard on Broadway yesterday, but, up to 
the hour of going to press, could not be 
verified. Heretofore, those two houses 
have been dark during the Summer months, 
although the Keith interests are now show- 
ing films in the Alhambra. 

YANCSI DOLLY WANTS DIVORCE 

In the Supreme Court of New York last 
Monday Tancsi Dolly began suit for a 
divorce from Harry Fox, tbe comedian, 
whom she married in August. 1914. The 
summons and complaint were both sealed 
and filed in the office of the County Clerk. 



CORT OPENS 
FIGHT ON 

HEILIG 

GETS HOUSE IN PORTLAND 



Pobtland, Ore., June U^— Tbe presen- 
tation of "Flora Bella" yesterday at tbe 
Baker Theatre, by John Cort, marked the 
beginning of a theatrical war between 
Cort and Calvin Heilig, which has for its 
object tbe control of tbe Pacific North- 
west territory, long dominated by the 
Northwestern Theatrical Association, of 
which Cort is still general manager and 
Heilig president. 

Early in May, Heilig, and a group of 
Northwestern men, organized for tbe pur- 
pose of eliminating Cort from the Pacific 
Northwest field, claiming that be bad de- 
serted that territory by giving his time 
and attention to New York productions 
and leaving Heilig and bis co-workers to 
shift for themselves. 

This organization, however, did not have 
the effect of wiping out the old N. T. A., 
because Heilig, as president of "t bat organi- 
zation, could not oust Cort from the posi- 
tion of general manager, and Cort was un- 
able to get rid of Heilig. 

But Cort is fearful that bis power in the 
Northwest ia threatened. He takes great 
pride in the fact that it was principally 
through his efforts that the circuit theatres 
controlled by the N. T. A. became a factor 
in the theatrical field, and this pride has 
stirred up the same fighting spirit that 
marked his early efforts. 

The present war, therefore, promises to 
rival that in which he engaged seven or 
eight years ago against the Syndicate, and 
will "be fought in the same cities — Port- 
land, Spokane, Tacoma and Butte. He 
will operate through the N. T. A., which, 
because of him, has a booking arrangement 
with the Shoberts. 

Following the "Flora Bella" production, 
Cort will send "Very Good Eddie," "The 
Passing Show," with Al. Jolson; "The 
Masked Model" and other productions of 
his own and tbe Shuberts, to the four 
above named cities. William T. Pangle, 
speaking for Heilig, said : 

"The Heilig Theatre is booked up for 
June with 'Intolerance,' The Eyes of the 
World' and 'The Boomerang.' These 
shows were originally booked at this house 
and we would have provided for them in 
some of the local theatres had Mr. Cort 
shown an attitude of complying with the 
efforts to bnfld up the theatrical situation 
in tbe Northwest, which had been neg- 
lected. 

"The fight is strictly between Mr. Cort 
and Mr. Heilig, and is the outcome of a 
situation wherein it was sought to bridge 
the gap without serious trouble." 

A representative of Cort, on the other 
hand, said he knew that tbe Shuberts had 
advised Mr. Heilig that whatever attrac- 
tions he booked from them would have to 
have the sanction of Mr. Cort. "Inasmuch 
as Mr. Cort cancelled his bookings at the 
Heilig and arranged for the Baker you can 
see what this means," he said. "We have 
a theatre in Seattle and can get in the 
other cities whenever we choose to do so." 



FISH WON'T RELEASE EMPRESS 
Cincinnati, June 1L — George F. Fish, 
manager and lessee of tbe Empress The- 
atre, made a flying trip to Cincinnati last 
week from his summer home in Ocean 
City, N. J., to contradict stories published 
that he had given up the Empress to 
Thomas J. Hanks, for the International 
Circuit. Fish says bis lease does not ex- 
pire until July 15 and will be renewed 
before that time. He says next season will 
see low-priced vaudeville at the bouse, as 
formerly. He gave the management of the 
house for only four weeks while Hanks 
was to put on popular-priced shows. The 
bouse ran only eight days, when tbe city 
authorities closed it on account of "Her 
Unborn Child." Hanks gave up bis four 
weeks' lease. 



ELEVEN WANT TO JOIN LAMBS 

The May applicants for membership in 
the Lambs' Club are as follows: Profes- 
sional members: Dell Henderson, Will- 
iam D. Garwood, Carl Harbaugh, Henry 
Bergman, Edwin Schneider, David Bennett 
and Sam Ash. Army and Navy Members: 
Clarence M. Stone. Non-Resident Mem- 
bers: Allen Doone, Edward Hart and J. 
MacFarlane Howie. 



MAY DIVORCE DOROTHY RUSSELL 

Pittbbubuii, Pa., June II. — Tbe grant- 
ing of a divorce is recommended in tbe 
submitting of a master's report to the 
Court of Common Pleas here, in the action 
instituted by Edward J. O'Reilly against 
his wife, Dorothy Russell O'Reilly, 
daughter of Lillian Russell. The grounds 
are ascribed as desertion. 



PETE BARLOW IS DEAD 

Pittsburgh, Pa., June 12. — Pete Bar- 
low, the animal trainer, died here yester- 
day. Some years ago, Barlow had a 
' trained elephant act at the Hippodrome, 
and, in the past few years, had been tour- 
ing vaudeville with an act called "Barlow's 
Comedy Circus." 



WHITNEY IS INSURANCE MAN 

Cincinnati, June 11. — Howard Whit- 
ney, remembered as one of the Whitney 
Brothers, who bad a novelty musical act 
a score of years ago, and also for his 
"animal" songs, is now an insurance man 
here. He is operating under the name of 
S. Howard Swope, and is soon to open an 
office in New York. 



MISS RAMBEAU TO GET DECREE 

Counsel for Marjorie Rambeau last Mon- 
day submitted a motion to Justice Guy, in 
the Supreme Court of New York, to con- 
firm tbe report of the referee in the action 
for absolute divorce brought by Miss Ram- 
beau against Willard Mack. 



SHUBERTS TO MANAGE WALNUT 

Philadelphia, June 11. — The Walnut 
Street Theatre, of which Ben Stern bas 
been lessee, will be under the management 
of the Shuberts, who bave secured the 
lease through Leonard Blumberg, next 
season. 



MABEL HAMILTON HAS NEW ACT 

Mabel Hamilton, formerly of the team 
of Clark & Hamilton, will break in a new 
act, written by Blanche Merrill, at Staten 
Island next week. 



"HAPPY" NAULTY DEAD 

Philadelphia, Pa., June 9. — Joseph T. 
(Happy) Naulty, the minstrel man, died 
here yesterday. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



MANAGERS AND 
UNIONS CAN'T 
SETTLERAISE 

DISAGREE AT EVERY CONFERENCE 



After two weeks of argument, discussion 
and looking at the matter from all sides, 
the Executive Board of the International 

Alliance of Stage Employees and Motion 
Picture Operators of the United States and 
Canada, and the managers representing the 
United Theatrical Managers' Protective 
Association, have not been able to reach 
an agreement regarding the increase of 
wages requested for the members of the 
road crews of theatrical attractions. As a 
matter of fact, they are reported further 
from an agreement than they were at the 
beginning of the sessions. 

When the conferences opened, it was 
said that a raise of $5 a week per man 
would be sought, but when the board met 
with the managers, a demand for a $10 per 
week raise for each man was made, and 
the managers are blunt in their refusal to 
grant it. It is expected that the confer- 
ences will continue in session until the 
differences are adjusted. 

It is claimed by the stage hands, that, 
with the existing high cost of living, they 
cannot come ont ahead at the end of the 
season under the present scale of wages, 
and the members of the Board have all 
been convinced that they must obtain this 
increase for the carpenters, electricians, 
propertymen and their assistants before 
the termination of this session. 

It was anticipated when the session 
began that all of the business would be 
finished last Thursday. But, when the 
matter of the increase in wages came np. 
the members of the Executive Board 
found that they had hit a "stone wall." 
They informed the managers of existing 
conditions and expected they say to have 
no trouble in having their request granted. 
It appears, though, that several of the 
managers could not take the same view- 
point, and balked at their request. 

It is said that a large number of the 
members of the organization will be subject 
to the selective draft in September, and 
that, as a result, there will be a scarcity of 
stage employes next season. With the 
problem of the scarcity of help confront- 
ing the managers, those who are attending 
the sessions of the executive board seem 
to feel assured that the latter will quickly 
come to their way of thinking and grant 
the increase asked. 

At the sessions which took place during 
the past two weeks a large number of 
matters from all parts of the country were 
taken up by the Executive Board for ad- 
justment. These matters were all of in- 
terest only to the unions in the district 
they came from. 

An important matter which received a 
thorough thrashing ont, however, was the 
unionization of the Fox and Moss Circuit 
of vaudeville and motion picture theatres. 
A few of the members desired the board 
to take summary action, but after consid- 
erable discussion it was finally decided by 
the board to refer the matter to Inter- 
national President Charles C. Shay for any 
action he sees fit to take. 

It is expected that conferences will be 
held with the heads of these circuits during 
the next week and, if no agreement can 
be reached, the organization will then 
.notify its members that these theatres "do 
not employ Union Labor." 

Those who have been in daily attendance 
at the sessions besides International Pres- 
ident Shay, are William Rusk, W. F. Can- 
avan, Charles MoHoy, Richard Green, 
■ Louis Kraus. F. G. Lemaster, EL A 
Clarke, James Lemke and John J. Barry. 



STAGE HANDS ELECT OFFICERS 

The annual election of officers of Local 
35 of the International Alliance of The- 
atrical Stage Employees and Motion Pic- 
ture Operators of the United States and 
Canada was held last Sunday. The only 
contests that prevailed were for the office 
of recording secretary and members of 
the executive board. Harold Williams, 
who has been acting as business agent 
for the local during the last five years, 
was elected president without opposition. 
Walter Cartwright was elected vice-presi- 
dent. William McVey and J. J. Hagen 
were candidates for the office of recording 
secretary. McVey was elected by a close 
vote. Gus Durkin was re-elected to the 
office of financial secretary-treasurer, and 
Joseph De Brandt was elected sergeant-at- 
arms. 

There were seven contestants for mem- 
bership on the executive board, and John 
Stevens, Sam Joseph, Dan Riley and Ru- 
dolph Otto were those who succeeded in 
gaining the coveted honors. Harry. Dig- 
can was elected business agent to succeed 
Williams. Those elected as delegates to 
the Theatrical Federation of Greater New 
York are Harold Williams, Gus Durkin 
and Harry Dignan. Williams was also 
elected as delegate to" the New York State 
Federation of Labor. The newly elected 
officers will be inducted into office next 
Sunday at the meeting rooms, 409 West 
Forty-seventh Street. 



IJLLIAN HALE SUES ESTATE 
Seattle, Wash., June 6. — TJIIian Hale, 
in private life Mrs. B. S. Dean, on Mon- 
day filed a suit against the heirs of the 
late Peter Dean for a division of his 
estate, of which she claims a one- fourth 
interest 

Miss Hale began an action in San Fran- 
cisco two years ago against her husband 
for separate maintenance, but settled out 
of court. By- the terms of the settlement 
she received a one-fourth interest in 
$125,000 worth of Seattle property, to- 
gether with stocks and property in San 
Francisco valued at $20,000. Miss Hale is 
at present in vaudeville presenting her 
playlet, "The Phantom Rival," with Ben 
Armstrongs the act being known as Arm- 
strong and Hale. They are laying off 
for two weeks in Seattle in order to give 
Miss Hale time to attend to the matters 
of her suit in the court there, after which 
they will return to Chicago. 

MANAGERS CONSIDER CONTRACT 

A meeting of the United Theatrical 
Managers' Protective Association was held 
in the offices of the organization last Mon- 
day afternoon. Marc Klaw, president of 
the organization, who has just returned 
from an extended trip through the West, 
presided. There were about twenty-five 
members present. 

A committee composed of Marc Klaw, 
Lee Shnbert, Sam H. Harris, Al. H. Woods 
and Alf. Hayman was selected to confer 
with a committee representing the Act- 
ors' Equity Association regarding the 
proposed artists' contract. The meeting 
wfO be held the latter part of this week. 
It was decided to hold weekly meetings 
of the association until further notice on 
account of the existing conditions. 

NEW ACT BREAKING IN 

"The Spirit of "76," a spectacular tab- 
leau and singing act composed of twenty- 
four people, is breaking in the first half 
of this week at Proctor's Theatre, Port- 
chester. New York. A number of prom- 
inent society women and men are appear- 
ing in the act, which is sponsored by 
social leaders. Among those in the cast 
are Grace Whitney, Vera Bernard, Albert 
T. Bickford and Robert It. Cullen. The 
act is being handled by Jack Henry. It 
will play New London, Conn., the last 
half of this week, and will then be 
brought into one of the two-a-day houses 
in New York. 



MUSICIANS AT 

ODDS WITH 

COMPOSERS 

UNION TAKES UP FEE QUESTION 



A. E. A. ATTORNEY DEAD 

Charles Burnell Willard, twenty-seven 
years old, who recently gave up his posi- 
tion of associate counsel of the Actors' 
Equity Association, to go into military 
training at Plattsburg, N. Y., died there 
last week from nneumonia. He was a 
graduate of Hamilton College. 



DIAL TO SHOW LOAN RECORDS 

The management of the Rialto Theatre, 
in doing its "bit" for the Liberty Loan, 
has established a dial in front of that house 
upon which will be recorded every purchase 
made in the loan until the campaign for 
$2,000,000,000 comes to a dose on Friday 
at midnight. 



The American Federation* of Musicians 
is very much incensed at the attitude of 
' the American Society of Authors, Com- 
posers and Publishers, with reference to 
the collection of its royalty fee from 
restaurants and hotels, and, as a result, 
are considering the advisability of taking 
measures to combat the organization, 
which may necessitate the refusal of 
their members to play compositions con- 
trolled by members of the society. 

At the convention of the A. F. of M., 
held in Hartford, Conn., last month, dele- 
gates from all parts of the country called 
the attention of the convention to the en- 
deavors of the Authors* Society to collect 
a royalty fee from establishments where 
they were employed. They declared that 
in a number of establishments in the 
territory they represented, the proprietors 
were compelled to cut down the size of 
the orchestra so as to be able to meet the 
license fee demands of the society. Some 
of the delegates reported instances where 
the hotels and restaurants in their dis- 
trict had discharged the entire orchestra 
and suspended altogether the rendition of 
musical numbers in their places. 

It was shown that, as a result of this 
move on the part of the Authors' Society, 
a large number of musicians were thrown 
out of employment. In the Atlantic and 
New England States several hundred were 
thus affected. 

The speakers who brought the matter 
up desired to have the convention take 
summary action. They wanted the or- 
ganization to absolutely refuse to allow 
its members to play any of the composi- 
tions controlled by the members of the 
society. It was argued that there were 
sufficient musical compositions not the 
property of the American society which 
could be played without the payment of 
a license fee to give a satisfactory enter- 
tainment to the patrons of establish- 
ments. 

After considerable debate the matter 
was referred to the National Executive 
Committee, which, in turn, referred it to 
President Joseph Weber of the Federa- 
tion, for investigation. He has been con- 
ducting a thorough inquiry into the mat- 
ter and, during the past few weeks, has 
received a great many complaints from 
all parts of the country regarding the en- 
deavors of the society to collect the fee. 
The locals which have made these com-, 
plaints reported that in almost every in- 
stance where the society had made their 
demand, the proprietor of the establish- 
ment had either cut the size of his orches- 
tra or eliminated it altogether. 

It has been learned that the American 
Federation of Musicians is compiling a 
list of compositions that are not subject 
to the license fee and it will be forwarded 
to its members. When this is done, it is 
said, the members of the Federation may 
refuse to play any selections other than 
those appearing on this list and, in that 
way, avoid any conflict with the American 
Society of Authors, Composers and Pub- 
lishers. 

It is claimed the society has told the 
American Federation they would not hold 
the members of the organization legally 
responsible for the violation of the copy- 
right law in the rendition of their com- 
positions. But it appears that the musi- 
cians are not inclined to accept this 
waiver on the part of the society, and 
will refrain from violating the law by 
not playing the compositions controlled 
by the members of the organization. 

It is not expected that action in the 
matter will be taken by President Joseph 
Weber of the federation before the mid- 
dle of next month. 



NEW PALAIS ROYAL REVUE OPENS 

"Frocks and Frills" is the title of a 
Summer revue which began a ten weeks' 
engagement at the Palais Royal on Mon- 
day night with the following roster of per- 
formers : Daisy Orwin, late of Daly's, Lon- 
don ; Harry Deli, of the Cohan Revue: 
Michi Itow, of "BuaMdo" fame; Charles 
de Haven, late of "Miss Springtime"; the 
Two Briants, late of the Hippodrome; La 
Aylph, an Egyptian dancer; Anita Elson, 
late of the Cohan Revue; Murray Ander- 
son and Cynthia Perot, dancers. The 
entire production was staged and produced 
by Murray Anderson. Fritzi Scbeff and 
her Revue terminated, their engagement at 
the Palais Royal on Sunday night, wheu 
their eight weeks' contract with the man- 
agement had been fulfilled. 



UPPER COURT SUSTAINS FOY 

Sustaining the lower court in the case 
of Morris Rose against Eddie Foy, the 
Appellate term of the Supreme Court last 
week, held that Rose was not entitled to a 
commission as Foy's agent. Rose secured 
an engagement for Foy with the World 
Film Corporation at a salary of $15,000 
for five weeks' work. While Rose was mak- 
ing this arrangement for Foy, the actor, on 
his own behalf, had closed with the 
Triangle concern, accepting an offer of 
$20,000 for six weeks' work. Foy was 
represented by O'Brien, Malevinsky and 
Driscoll. Alexander Rosenthal appeared 
for Rose. 



MRS. HENRY'S MOTHER ILL 

Mrs. Jack Henry, who is in charge of 
her husband's booking offices in the Put- 
nam Building, was called to Hion, N. Y., 
last Friday on account of the serious ill- 
ness of her mother. 



AGENTS FORM ASSTV. 

(Continued from page 3.) 

a letter to Gov. Whitman protesting against 
its being signed. 

At the meeting Monday night, Pat 
Casey is said to have told those present 
that the Governor had signed this measure. 
In explaining the purport of the measure, 
Casey told the members that in the future 
they need not fear any interference on the 
part of Bell in then; operations as they 
would be managers of acts and not agents. 

He then told the agents of the Fitz- 
gerald case and the amount of expense 
which had been incurred in practically 
fighting their battle. He said it was 
enormous and that it wonld be only fair 
for the agents to get together and carry 
on their own fights in the future. 

Mr. Casey then informed those present 
that the Loew agents were to be recognized 
as the brethren of the United agents and, 
in future, they were to co-operate for 
mutual benefit and all were to become 
members of the new organization. 

At the present rime, the Loew agents 
have an organization of their own which 
is called the Vaudeville Artists Representa- 
tives Association of which Irving Cooper 
is president. It is quite likely that, as 
soon as the new organization is in opera- 
tion, the Loew organization will be dis- 
solved, with all of the Loew agents in the 
new organization. 

Casey then told the agents that, even 
though the Fitzgerald matter had been dis- 
posed of, they could never tell when there 
would be a likelihood of some similar 
action and, if it should come, they should 
be prepared to defend it as an organiza- 
tion. For this purpose he suggested that 
they establish a so-called legal fund which 
would be at the disposal of those who 
might at some time or other have legal 
difficulties. i 

He then informed them that, as Maurice 
Goodman had acted for them in obtaining 
the passage of the Walters measure, it 
would be advisable to retain him as counsel 
of the new organization. This suggestion 
was quickly heeded and Goodman will 
direct the legal destiny of the new or- 
ganization. 

Mr. Casey was the only one who spoke 
at length at the meeting, the others simply 
asking questions at various times. Mr. 
Goodman was also present at the meeting. 
Another meeting, at which temporary of- 
ficers will be elected and the plans of 
organization formulated will be held the 
end of this week or the early part of next. 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



ACTORS FUND IS 

LEFT CLOSE TO 

$1,000,000 

STRANGER BEQUEATHS $500,000 • 



Two gifts were received by the Actors' 
Fund of America last week which' aggre- 
gate in tbe vicinity of $1,000,000, when 
tbe contents of the will of Alice M. Fitch, 
mother of Clyde Fitch, tbe playwright, and 
John Hoge, of Zanesville, Ohio, were made 
known. Mrs. Fitch left the entire contents 
of her home, and the rights to all plays 
written by her son to tbe fund. Hoge 
deeded a parcel of property located at 518 
Fifth Avenue, wholly unencumbered, and 
valued at $500,000, to tbe fund. 

Much mystery surrounded the identity 
of Hoge. He was unknown in tbe theat- 
rical business in New York City. He was 
not a first-nighter, not a boulevardier nor 
a man-about-town. No one seemed to 
know who be was, except that be came 
from Zanesville. But it could not be 
understood bow any one not interested in 
show business would make such an unusual 
bequest. 

Only one person knew his identity and 
be was a prominent New York attorney- 
Some months ago this lawyer called upon 
David Gerber, who is the attorney for the 
Actors' Fund, and requested him to furnish 
him with a copy of the constitution and 
by-laws of the Fund. He stated that a 
client of his, a very wealthy man, intended 
to remember tbe Actors' Fund in bis will, 
which was about to be drawn up. The at- 
torney stated that he had an idea that the 
Fund's charter did not permit it to acquire 
real estate beyond a certain amount, and 
that he desired an examination of it for 
this purpose. The request was granted, 
and it was found necessary to have the 
charter amended by the State Legislature 
to enable the fund to receive the gift. 

There was considerable delay in getting 
the measure through the Legislature on 
account of tbe pressure of other business. 
But it was finally signed by the Governor 
two weeks ago. 

Even then, the attorney would not reveal 
the identity of his client, and the only 
clue be would give was that' he was a 
prominent man who had once been in- 
terested in the ownership of a theatre. 

At the time of the severe illness of tbe 
late "Diamond" Jim Brady, it was thought 
that he might have been the man. But 
investigation showed that he bad never 
been interested in tbe ownership of a the- 
atre. 

However, after the bequest was made it 
was ascertained that Hoge was at one 
time the owner of tbe Shultz Opera House 
in Zanesville. 

The property is an eight-story building, 
and the revenue derived from it will go 
greatly toward meeting the $6,000 monthly 
expense of tbe home. 



MORE FUND PRIZES AWARDED 

The members of the theatrical profes- 
sion did not share so badly in tbe allot- 
ment of prizes and awards at the Actors' 
Fund Fair which was held last month in 
Grand Central Palace. The following list 
i of theatrical winners was issued by TYal- 
demar de Bille, executive director of the 
fair, last Monday: Diane Oste, a Kurz- 
man gown; Roscoe 'Tatty" Ar buckle, cut- 
glass pitcher; Eugene Cowles, Chevrolet 
automobile; Dave Marion, the Oldtown 
canoe; Harry C. Broun, manager of the 
Princess Theatre, Edison phonograph ; 
Florence Auer, negligee set; Consuelo 
Bailey, SI ,200 building lot; Marcia Harris, 
twenty-five volume Mark Twain set; 
Elizabeth Gergely, the Elizabeth Gergely 
doll; Wilfred Lucas, Geraldine Farrar 
bag; Yvonne Garrick, French novel; Baby 
Mary Morrisey, hand embroidered dress; 
Isabel Irving, evening coat, and Margaret 
Mayo-Selwyn the cape donated bv Kolin- 
sky. 



"FOUR CHICKS" BEING SHOWN 

The "Four Chicks," a new girt act under 
the direction of Joe Shea, is at the Harlem 
Opera House the first balf of this week. 



EX-CHORUS GIRL SUES ESTATE 

Gertrude Reynolds, once a chorus girl 
and later the wife of tbe late James Pol- 
lack McQuaide, has started an action in 
the Surrogates' Court to obtain a large 
share of the fortune of more than $5,000,- 
000 left by him. Miss Reynolds was the 
third wife of Mr. McQuaide, and married 
again two weeks after his death. She has 
filed a petition in the courts to remove 
Mrs. Sarah S. McQuaide, second wife of 
McQuaide, as administratrix of the estate. 



ERBER LEASES DECATUR HOUSE 

DXCAXUB, IU., June 11. — Nate Erber, 
of Danville, has taken a ten-year lease 
on the Lincoln Square Theatre, and win 
immediately convert it into a motion pic- 
ture house. Legitimate attractions did not 
prove drawing cards here last season, so 
the owners of the house were glad of the 
opportunity to lease it to Erber for pic- 
ture purposes. He will reopen it in July. 



HELENA COLLIER TO CELEBRATE 

Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Garrick will cele- 
brate their silver wedding at their country 
place at St. James, L. I., next Friday. 
Mrs. Garrick was for many years a popular 
comedienne, known to the stage as Helena 
Collier. She is a sister of Willie Collier. 



FOX FILM AT STANDARD 

The Annette Kellerman picture "A 
Daughter of the Gods," will play a two 
weeks' engagement at the Standard The- 
atre, beginning next Monday. After this 
engagement the house will be closed for 
the rammer, reopening on Labor Day. 

ZANESVILLE MGR. ARRESTED 
Zanesville, O., June 9. — E. R. Harris, 
manager of the Orpheum, was arrested last 
week for alleged exhibition of indecent 
posters of the picture "Purity" in front of 
the theatre. The case has been carried 
higher. 



SUNDAY TO TALK TO ACTORS 

Billy Sunday has extended an invitation 
to the members of the theatrical profession 
and their friends to attend a special ser- 
mon at the Tabernacle to-morrow evening 
at 7.30. 



MOUNTFORD TALKS TO ACTORS 

Harry Mountford was among the speak- 
ers at the monthly meeting of tbe Actors' 
Church Alliance held last Thursday. He 
spoke on tbe modern evils connected with 
the theatrical profession. 



TEAM ENGAGED FOR SHOW 

Percy Bronson and Winnie Baldwin re- 
placed Robert Emmett Keane and Hattie 
Burke in the cast of "His Little Widows," 
at tbe Astor Theatre this week. 



"BRONCHO BILLY'S" SISTER WEDS 

San Francisco. Cal., June 10. — Miss 
Leon a Anderson, sister of G. M. Anderson, 
nag been married to Alfred M. Rosenstirn, 
a local real estate broker. 



AL. WHITE SIGNED FOR COMEDY 

AI B. White has been engaged to star in 
"The Naughty Princess," a musical pro- 
duction which William B, Friedlander has 
written. 



MADELINE CAMERON TO MARRY 

The engagement of Madeline Cameron, of 
the Cameron Sisters, and William Gaxton, 
late of "Kisses," has been announced. 



HARRY BUDD ENLISTS 

ClNcnrRATl, June 11. — Harry Budd, of 
John E. Kellard's Shakespearean company 
has enlisted in the artillery. 



BILLY BAUGH REGISTERS 

Ikdianafolis, Ind., June 9. — Billy 
Baugh, of Baugh and Dixon, registered 
here. 



LAWRENCE LEHMAN IN N. Y. 

Lawrence Lehman, of the Orpheum The- 
atre, Kansas City, Mo., is visiting New 
York. 



LIGHTS ARE GAY 

AT FORMAL 

OPENING 

HOLD ELECTION TOMORROW 



Fbeepobt. L. I., June 11. — With the 
weather all in their favor, the Lights of- 
ficially opened their clubhouse for the sea- 
son on Saturday last to a crowd of vaude- 
ville and theatrical folk who made a two 
days' affair of the celebration, starting the 
festivities early Saturday and not abandon- 
ing their revelry until the wee sma' hours 
on Monday morning. 

With tbe first real Summer weather of 
the season, the crowd was quick to take 
advantage of tbe surf bathing and the new 
beach which the Lights have fixed up 
proved to be a very popular resort for the 
members and their friends. 

Tbe formal festivities took place at tbe 
dinner on Saturday night, when the club 
fed more than five hundred persons. The 
dinner was presided over by Victor Moore, 
chief master of ceremonies. But tbe edict 
had gone out that no speeches were to be 
delivered. So the, guests were spared. 
However, there was entertainment aplenty 
during the meal, and some of those who 
helped to entertain were George McKay, 
Harry Breen, George Whiting, Ralph 
Austin, James Conlin and Harry Puck. 

A baseball game on Saturday afternoon 
brought victory to the Lights over the 
Friars by a score of 10 to 2. Paul Morton 
and George Whiting pitched the team to 
victory. They were opposed on tbe mound 
by Sam Hanke. On Sunday, tbe Lights' 
team was not so fortunate, losing to the 
Red Sox by a score of 4 to 0, with Ernie 
Stanton a defeated pitcher. 

Tbe evenings were spent mostly in danc- 
ing, and tbe dance floor was crowded until 
the early hours of morning. 

To-morrow the Lights hold their annual 
election at 8 p. u.. when the officers for 
tbe ensuing term will be chosen. The 
ticket is as follows : Angel, Victor Moore : 
vice-president, Harry Bulger; financial 
secretary, Robert H. Hodge; recording 
secretary, Fritz -Tidden ; treasurer, Frank 
Kauffman. 



"MERRY MAKERS" JOIN ARMY 

Pawtucket, R. I., June 11. — Jack 
Molloy, carpenter of March's Musical 
Merry Makers, left the company last Satur- 
day to join tbe Army. Five other members 
of tbe company registered last week and 
are subject to call for tbe selective draft. 
H. J. Maxwell, manager of the company, 
presented his wife, Ruth Wheeler, with a 
Liberty Loan bond. 



KAY LAURELL SHEEHAN ILL 

White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., June 
11. — Mrs. Kay Laurell Sheehan, formerly 
one of the stars of the "Follies" is recu- 
perating here after a. nervous breakdown 
which she suffered several weeks ago. 
Upon her return to health she will go back 
to the stage, according to her present plans, 
and will be seen in a musical production. 



LONG SUCCEEDS BIRD 

Ralph Long, formerly auditor of the 
Shuberts, bas been appointed to act in the 
capacity of general manager, succeeding 
Charles A. Bird, who retired from that 
position last week. Mr. Bird left for his 
home in Hornell, N. Y., where he will 
spend tbe Summer. 



BROOKE JOINS LETTY SHOW 

Tyler Brooke left for Denver on Sun- 
day, where be will open as juvenile lead 
in Oliver Morosco's "So Long Letty" next 
week. In this piece, Brooke will make bis 
Pacific Coast debut. 



CLOWNS ENGAGED FOR HIP 

Rossi and Brunswick, producing clowns, 
formerly with the Sparks' Show, have been 
engaged for next season's show at the 
Hippodrome. 



WOODS-BELASCO CASE SETTLED 

Al. H. Woods and David Belasco have 
settled their differences with respect to the 
injunction granted the former stopping 
Belasco from producing "The Tiger Rose," 
a play written by Willard Mack. Woods 
has released Mack from a five-year con- 
tract to furnish him with all bis plays and, 
for this release. Mack bas turned over to 
the producer five of his plays, including 
"Kick In," "Broadway and Buttermilk," 
and "Her Market Value." No royalty is 
to be paid the author in the future on any 
of them. 

Mr. Belasco is to have tbe privilege of 
producing "The Tiger Rose" next season, 
and bas guaranteed Woods that he will 
receive for bis share of the royalties of 
this production during the season a sum of 
money that will amount to about $20,000. 
Tbe Mack-Woods contract bas been turned 
over to .Belasco and in tbe future Mack 
will submit all his writings to Mr. Belasco 
for consideration. 



CHOOSE. BROADHURST PLAY 

George Broadhurst's "Bought and Paid 
For" is the first play selected by the 
British soldiers to be produced at the Gar- 
rison Institute and Theatre, Park Hill 
Camp, Oswestry, England. It will run for 
two weeks. Subsequently, with the same 
cast, it will open the soldiers theatre, in 
Kinmel Park,, another English training 
camp. The camp theatre' at Oswestry is 
the first to be organized, controlled and 
operated by tbe British army. 



DANCER WEDS DAN HANNA, JR. 

Indianapolis, Ind., June -11. — Ruth 
Randall, a dancer who was with the Ray- 
mond Hitchcock company last season in 
"Betty," was mariied here Saturday after- 
noon to Daniel R. Hanna, Jr., son of 
Daniel R. Hanna and grandson of the late 
United States Senator, Mark Hanna. 
Young Mr. Hanna is in camp at Fort 
Benjamin Harrison as a member of the 
Officers' Reserve Training Corps. 



SIX RIALTO USHERS ENLIST 

Six ushers at the Rialto Theatre have 
enlisted in the United States Navy. They 
are Henry Ranft, chief usher; Frank Far- 
rell, Louis High, Grant Wood, William 
Senior and Jay Moore. Mr. Rothapfel has 
assured all employes who leave to serve 
their country that tbey may have their 
positions back when they return. 



WOODS GETS ANOTHER FARCE 

"The Private Suite" is the title of a 
new farce which A. H. Woods will place 
in rehearsal on June 25. In tbe company 
will be John Westley. Florence Moore. 
Francine Larrimore; Jane Grey, Dudley 
Hawley, Thomas Meade, Harry LUford 
and Caroline Lilja. 



JESSIE CRISWOLD RE-ENGAGED 

Jessie Griswold. who played Betsy 
Bowers with Clifford Hippie in "Shameen 
Dhu" last season, has been engaged for 
the coming season with Mr. Hippie in his 
new play, "Under the Influence. 

ACTRESS GIVES FLAG TO MAYOR 

Catherine Proctor, the actress, has pre- 
sented to Mayor Mltchel the large British 
flag which was given to her by the Mayor 
of Toronto to decorate the Canadian booth 
at the recent Actors' Fund fair. 



LAMB MUSICAL PLAY RENAMED 

Arthur Lamb's musical play, "The 
Teasers," has been recbristened "Tbe Pearl 
of Yokohama" and Le Comte and Lydiard 
will send out two companies to play it next 
season. 



FRANK PACKWA ENLISTS 

Prof. Frank Packwa, the hypnotist, has 
enlisted in the Red Cross service in the 
Base Hospital Corps. He will soon go to 
the French front. 



"EVE'S DAUGHTER" PRESENTED 

Washington, D. C, June 6. — "Eve's 
Daughter," a play by Alicia Ramsey, was 
given its first production on Monday night 
at the Belasco Theatre by Wm. A. Brady. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



George Has Done It Again 








And His Newest Dancing Star 



EMMA 






THIS WEEK B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




VAUDEVILLE HOUSES ARE 

BREAKIN G SUMM ER RECORDS 

Only One Big New York House Has Closed and Others Have 

Not Named Closing Dates as Yet. Many Play to 

Capacity as in Winter Months 



The present vaudeville season is the 
most prosperous and the longest that has 
been experienced in many years due, no 
doubt, to the ideal show weather that has 
been hanging on long past its customary 
time. 

In New York City, the Alhambra is 
tlie only vaudeville house that has closed 
thus far, and both the big time and smaller 
houses are playing to much the same busi- 
ness they experienced in the Winter 



months. Keith's Colonial Theatre, which 
usually closes simultaneously with the Al- 
hambra, is still open and playing to big 
houses. Manager Al. Darling announces 
that its closing date has not yet been de- 
cided upon, and it will remain open for at 
least several weeks more. The Riverside, 
which is passing through its first Summer, 
will probably remain open all season, and 
is playing to its customary crowds. Stand- 
ing room is nothing unusual. 



CELEBRATE IN HOSPITAL 

Charles J. Ross and Mabel Fenton cel- 
ebrated the thirtieth ' anniversary of their 
marriage at the Post Graduate Hospital, 
where Mr. Ross has been confined since 
May 17, last Saturday. Hundreds of tel- 
egrams and letters of congratulation 
were received by the couple. 



CHOP SUEY REPLACES MAXWELL 

The premises which Joe Maxwell, the 
producer, formerly used as his place of 
business at 306 West One Hundred and 
Twenty-fifth Street, now has a big sign 
painted over the windows announcing the 
Amboy Chop Suey Restaurant. 



ROUTE REUNITES SPLIT ACT 

Lydell and Higgins announced early 
last Friday a. m. that they had decided 
to split as partners and about a half hour 
inter Al. Lydell breathlessly announced 
that it was not true as the act had re- 
ceived a long route for next season. 

- • 

MAKE PLAY OF "SERGEANTEENE" 

Jack Arnold, author of "The Sergean- 
teene," a skit based upon the enlistment 
problem which appeared at the New 
Brighton Theatre last week. Is expanding 
it into a three-act play. 

CLAYTON AND LENNIE SIGNED 

Ed Clayton and Frank Lennie are 
signed to appear the coming season in a 
tabloid to be produced by Boyle Wool- 
folk, of Chicago. 

NEW ACT BEING TRIED OUT 

Sutton, Mclntyre and Sutton in a new 
version of "The Perfume Shop," written 
by James Madison, are breaking in new 
material on the Poll time. 



NESTLER BACK WITH LOEW 

Harry Nestler, who was in the Loew 
office for several years, and left to go into 
the commercial field, returned to his old 
post last Monday. 



LEONARD AFTER VAUDE. TIME 

Benny Leonard, the new lightweight 
champion pugilist, is feeling out several 
vaudeville circuits. A route is not dis- 
tasteful to the new champion. 



GEORGE SHINN ENLISTS 

George H. Shinn, formerly with Mark 
Linder's sketch, has enlisted in the 21st 
Field Artillery, Battery E, and is stationed 
at Camp Wilson, Texas. 

AL HERMAN IN "FROLIC" 

Al Herman, the blackface comedian, haa 
been engaged for the Ziegfeld Midnight 
Frolic, atop the New Amsterdam Theatre. 



NEW ACT TO BREAK IN 

Adele Oswald will break in her new 
songologue at the Palace Theatre, Staten 
Island, the last half of this week. 



MOSS GETS MACK BOOKINGS 

Arrangements were made last week be- 
tween B. S. Moss and J. Herbert Mack, 
whereby the B. S. Moss Vaudeville Book- 
ing Agency will supply the Sunday vaude- 
ville talent, next season at the Star and 
Gayety theatres, Brooklyn, beginning 
Labor Day week. Charles W. Morgen- 
stern has been providing for these houses. 



MINISTER TO SING IN VAUDE. 

Zanesville, O., June 9. — From vest- 
ments to vaudeville. That's the jump just 
made by Rev. Frank W. Gorman, pastor 
of the Congregationalist Church here. He 
has left for New York to open a seven- 
weeks engagement on the Keith circuit. In 
August he'll be back in his pulpit here. 



N. V. A. READY FOR SUMMER 

The National Vaudeville Artist club 
rooms are getting all dolled up for the 
Summer. In the course of a week, all the 
furnishings will have donned their warm 
weather clothes. A system of cooling has 
also been installed and Secretary Chester- 
field has promised to make the club rooms 
a cool refuge from the Summer beat. 



BOBBY HEATH MARRIES PARTNER 

Philadelphia, June 9. — Bobby Heath, 
Robin J. Frear, the vaudeville performer, 
was married last Thursday to his stage 
partner, Miss Lillian R. Crane, at his 
home here. Heath was divorced a few 
weeks ago from bis first wife. 



ARONSON MADE KEITH MANAGER 

Atlantic City, June 9. — Jules E. Aron- 
son has been appointed manager of the 
B. F. Keith Theatre, on the Garden Pier, 
and will inaugurate the season at that 
bouse on June 25. 



WALTER SISTERS HAVE NEW ACT 
The Walter Sisters, Ollie and Flo, have 
returned with their mother after a five 
months' absence in New Mexico, and are 
planning a new song and dance act 



PIERRE LE MAY GOES TO FRONT 

Pierre Le May, recently in vaudeville in 
the "Double Exposure," has been ordered 
to active duty with the United States Am- 
bulance Corps. 



GEO. BYRNE BACK FROM TRIP 

George Byrne, of Byrne & Kirby, has 
just returned from a two-week trip through 
New York State, visiting theatres to make 
arrangements to supply them with vaude- 
ville talent for next season. Byrne says 
he has signed four new houses and expects 
to have at least six more on his list before 
the Fall season opens. 



ROLLINS AND NORRIS TAKEN OUT 

Rollins and Norris were taken out of 
the bill at Keith's Royal on Friday night 
and replaced by Gray and Granlnnd. 



HARRY CLARKE TO DO SINGLE 

Harry Clarke, late juvenile lead in 
"You're In Love," will open at the Co- 
lonial next Monday in a single. 



GIRLS HAVE NEW ACT 

Hoboketj, N. J., June 9. — Laura Deane 
and May Richards have a new act in which 
they will open shortly. 



MEYERS ENGAGES SPEAKER 

W. R. Meyers, manager of the Hamilton 
Theatre, has engaged Richard Tucker to 
deliver a patriotic address at each perform- 
ance in the theatre this week in connection 
with the showing of the two-reel feature, 
"The Star-Spangled Banner." Seven 
United States soldiers are appearing with 
Tucker. 



JULIA ARTHUR NOT TO QUIT 

It has finally been decided that Julia 
Arthur is not to withdraw from "Liberty 
Aflame" in favor of Margaret Anglin, but 
will continue in the Roland Burke Hen- 
nessy sketch and tour with it to the coast. 



EMILY WELLMAN HAS NEW ACT 

Emily Ann Wellman began rehearsals 
last week of a new sketch by herself 
which is not yet named. Miss Wellman's 
company includes Kolman Matus, Dorothea 
Sadlier and Harry Stafford. 



PHELAN AND GORDON ENLIST 

Joe Phelan and Willie Gordon, of the 
Gordon Bros., are the latest recruits pro- 
cured by Joe Levy, of the Mark Levy 
office, for the Quartermaster Corps, at- 
tached to the State Arsenal. 



PREPARE NEW WELLMAN ACT 

Emily Ann Wellman is rehearsing a new 
playlet written by herself, which will open 
in two weeks. The supporting cast in- 
cludes Dorothea Sadlier, Robert Armstrong 
and Harry Stafford. 



SHEPPS CIRCUS BACK IN EAST 

Shepps Comedy Circus, which has been 
playing the Western circuits for the past 
year, has returned East and has been 
booked by Joe Michaels to play the B. S. 
Moss Circuit. 



ANNETTE WOODMAN BACK 

Annette Woodman, who recently re- 
turned from a three months' engagement 
at the Hotel Mirana, Havana, Cuba, baa 
rejoined the Grohs-King Co.'s dance pro- 
duction: 



CLARKE RETURNS TO VAUDE 

Harry Clarke, having finished his en- 
gagement in "You're in Love," will resume 
his vaudeville work next Monday at the 
Colonial. 



NEW HOOPER-MARBURY ACT 

Hooper and Marbury will introduce a 
new dancing act to vaudeville next week. 




ANGLIN WILL PLAY VAUDEVILLE 

It appears that there have been no 
change in Margaret Anglin's vaudeville 
plans, despite the fact that Julia Arthur 
has decided to continue in "Liberty 
Aflame." Miss Anglin will begin a tour of 
the Orpheum Circuit June 24 at San 
Francisco, appearing in "The Wager," an 
adaptation from the French by Mildred 
Aldrich. 



INTERN'L TO MEET FRIDAY 

A meeting of the directors of the Inter- 
national Circuit will be held in the ofliccs 
of George H. Xicolai next Friday for 
which Gus Hill will come to the city from 
his country home. At that time the gen- 
eral scope of operation of shows and thea- 
tres will be taken up as will also the 
matter of railroad transportation. 

HERBERT KELCEY VERY ILL 

Batpobt. L. I., June 9. — Herbert Kelcey, 
who has been ill for many months, was 
brought here yesterday, and is resting at 
the Shannon Cottage. Hia condition con- 
tinues grave. The last play in which Mr. 
Kelcey appeared was "Pollyuuna." His 
wife, Effie Shannon, also had a part in it. 

LUCIA MOORE IN "FRIEND MARTHA" 

Lucia Moore has been engaged by Edgar 
McGregor to play in Edward Peple's 
"Friend Martha" next season, in the role 
originated by Mabel Bert. Oza Waldrop 
will be seen in the title role, and Helen 
Lowell, Edmund Breese and Florence 
Edny are prominent in the cast. 



VIOLET BARLOW INJURED 

Lansing, Mich., June 9. — Violet Bar- 
low, of Eldredgc, Barlow & Eldredge, pre- 
senting "The Law" at the Empress The- 
atre, this week, sustained serious injuries 
when she fell into an unguarded basement 
way Wednesday evening. She Is at the 
Hotel Fleming. 



VETERAN MUSICIAN DIES 
Philadelphia, June 10. — Robert Hoppe, 
a veteran musician, died at his home here 
Friday in his sixty-seventh year. He was 
a native of Germany, and for several years 
first cornetlst with Sousa's Band. He is 
survived by a widow and two children. 



FEINBERG TO MANAGE PIER 

Abe I. Feinberg will manager the vaude- 
ville and motion picture show at Ocean 
Pier, Ocean City, N. J., this summer. He 
will inaugurate his season there on June 
30, when he • will offer eight vaudeville 
acts and a feature picture. 

MORRELL GETS ROUTE 

Frank Morrcll has obtained through 
Abe I. Feinberg a route of twenty weeks 
over the Pan tapes Circuit. He will open 
his engagement at the Pantages Theatre, 
Minneapolis, on June 24. 

SHORT HAS NEW PLAYLET 

Hazzard Short and company will pre- 
sent a new playlet, entitled "Ruby Ray," 
next week at Paterson, N. J., under the 
direction of M. S. Bentham. There are 
four members in the cast. 



ADONIS AND DOG HAVE NEW ACT 

Adonis and bis dog have a new act 
which will receive its premier at the Fifth 
Avenue Theatre on June 25. The act will 
be billed as Fawn and Fawn. 



TUCK STRAINS HIMSELF 

Bill Tuck, of Nip and Tock, suffered a 
strain while playing at the Palace Theatre. 
Newark, and the team was forced to lay 
off for the remainder of the week. 



Teddy Dupont in Vaudeville 



HOLMAN ACT READY JUNE 25 
Harry Holman will introduce a new act 
at the Colonial Theatre on June 25. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 




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PALACE 

Nora BayeH headlines this week's bill 
and offers forty minutes of delightful 
songs and chatter in which she scored 
one of the biggest bits ever recorded at 
this theatre. She is assisted by a pianist 
who is a splendid accompanist. 

The Australian Creightons open the 
show proper, with their eccentric club jug- 
gling and acrobatic offering and, unfor- 
tunately, missed nearly every trick they 
attempted. They should eliminate the 
kick and also wear coats while working 
on the stage, as men in shirt-sleeves are 
no longer popular at a bouse like the 
Palace. 

Phina and her company of four colored 
singers and dancers scored a big hit. 
They sang and ^wi^^il about in a fashion 
which swept everything before them and 
had an easy time getting big applause. 
As an encore bit, a little pickanniny 
steps out and, in all seriousness, offers an 
imitation of Frances White, singing 
"Mississippi." This bit was a near riot. 

Bert Levy in a atndio set, where a de- 
canter of liquor and several oars and In- 
dian clubs are placed to add atmosphere, 
did splendidly with his illuminated car- 
tooning stunt. He drew pictures of 
Pershing, Lincoln and Roosevelt and fin- 
ished with a good likeness of President 
Wilson. He has a few bits of comedy 
which went over nicely. 

Florenz Tempest and Marion Sunshine 
return with several new ditties and some 
dandy wardrobe. Tempest is still the 
boy throughout the act and did splendidly 
with her selections, and Sunshine proved 
to be as capable and as cute as ever. 
Their act came in for fine appreciation. 

Walter Brower offered a monologue in 
which his personality dominates his ma- 
terial. He scored all the way. At the 
finish, he recited a beautiful poem about 
"Water" with a good tag line. As an 
encore bit, he recited a poem entitled 
"The Old Feather Bed," by James Whit- 
comb Riley, which was also splendidly re- 
ceived. 

Closing the first part, came a hit in the 
shape of George White and Emma Halg 
in a splendid spectacular dance produc- 
tion conceived by White. The act is a 
corker and is more fully reviewed under 
New Acts. 

After intermission, Nora Bayes sang 
into the hearts of her listeners. The act 
is reviewed under New Acts. 

After Miss Bayes took twenty bows. 
Bert Levy stepped forth and in a short 
speech announced that George H. Bell, 
Commisisoner of Licenses, would say a 
few words about the Liberty Loan. 

Mr. Bell is an eloquent speaker and 
swayed the audience with a brief de- 
scription of the principles of the world 
struggle and what we are fighting for. 
He summed up the fact that the boys in 
the trenches would need ammunition and 
equipment and that his hearers could 
make the best investment possible by pur- 
chasing a Liberty Bond. His talk was 
brief and convincing and carried a punch 
at tbe finish. 

Rockwell and Wood then stepped out 
with new straw hats and several new 
bits of chatter and songs. They finished 
to big applause. To the credit of tbis 
act, it must be stated that they won big 
laughing honors and held the crowd in at 
a late hour with their routine of pure 
nonsense, scoring decidedly at the finish. 

The California Boys' Band closed the 
show with their splendid arrangement of 
march formations, while playing various 
melodies. The acrobatics of the act closed 
strongly. 

In view of the fact that the act is 
closing the show, it is suggested that the 
opening talk be eliminated in order to 
get down to the real meat of the act and 
hold those in that are interested. 

AU in all this is really the best running 
show as to comedy, spectacular and en- 
tertainment value presented at this house 
- in some time. S. I* H. 



SHOW REVIEWS 



(Continued on page Zl) 



FIFTH AVENUE 

Number one position was filled by 
Count J. M. De Beaufort who, as war 
correspondent for the London Daily TcL- 
graph, has seen two and a half years of 
the European war. 

Lulu Coates and her Three Cracker- 
jacks, a white woman and three colored 
youths, did a singing and dancing act 
that made a hit. The boys, dressed in 
red bell hop suits, open with a song and 
dance and Miss Coates joins them at the 
finish. She then does a single song and 
dance and is followed by the boys who 
do a rube number. Then comes a Hula- 
Hula number, after which one of the boys 
does a solo dance and, for the finish, Miss 
Coates and two of the boys do a song 
and dance which is topped by all three 
of the crackerjacke doing flip-flaps and 
tumbles. It is a lively, snappy offering. 
Miss Coates is an excellent dancer. Tbe 
boys are genuine "crackerjacks" in the 
art of Terpsichore, and are in the Al 
class of tumblers. 

George S. Brown and Gertrude Taylor 
do a classy singing act. They open with 
a duet. Brown then follows with a solo 
and Miss Taylor is heard in a pleasing 
number. They scored a success and, for 
an encore, they sang a Chinese number in 
costume. Miss Taylor possesses a well- 
trained voice and uses it to the best ad- 
vantage. Her solo work is above that 
usually beard in vaudeville. 

Una Clayton, Herbert Griffin & Co. 
scored well in "Collusion." It is a bright 
little skit in which the artist has married 
his model. They are as happy as the 
proverbial turtle doves until she begins 
to think she wants to be free. In order 
to obtain her freedom, she enlists the 
services of her most intimate friend to 
pose as the "other woman" and all goes 
well until the husband and friend, in re- 
hearsing what they are to do, get too 
Teal in their love-making to suit the wife 
and she calls the wholo thing off. 

The three players did good work, but 
just why the name of the woman who 
plays the friend does not appear on the 
program is a puzzle. Her performance 
entitles her to that much recognition. 

Betts, Chidlow and Hart, two men and 
a woman, present an act made up of 
quips, jokes, talk and songs and kept the 
audience in a merry mood. They have a 
good line of repartee and put it over well. 
They finished with a trio and scored a 
hit. 

Will Oakland and company, two men 
and a woman, \~ere seen in an Irish sketch 
entitled "Danny O'Gill, TJ. S. A." The 
skit tells of a return visit of Danny to 
his old Irish home to see his father and 
his sweetheart, Peggy. Peggy overhears 
Danny says the girl he maries must be 
rich and talented. She leads him a merry 
chase but finally capitulates. The sketch 
serves as an excellent vehicle for Oakland 
to introduce his songs, of which he sings 
three. The act found favor. 

Stan Stanley, the bouncing fellow, with 
his two assistants, scored the big hit of 
the bill, and was forced to respond to an 
encore. Stanley's work in the audience 
is as funny as ever and earns applause 
as well as laughs. His work with his 
male partner in one is full of laughs, and 
when he comes to the trampoline, applause 
falls to his share for exceptionally clever 
work. 

White's Circus closed the bill. White, 
with a girl assistant, puts dogs and ponies 
through various paces. He also shows 
what he claims to be the. "only high 
school mule in tbe world." The act is 
showy and was well liked. The special 
set shows the interior of a circus tent. 

B. W. 



AMERICAN 

Noack, the man on the Eiffel Tower, 
opened the bill and presented his equili- 
bristic act. He begins by doing hand 
stands and balances on chairs resting on 
their back legs. He then puts up the 
tower, the top of v ..ich is about twelve 
feet from the stage. On this he repeats 
his balancing stunts. For his big trick 
he balances two chairs on their front 
legs, stands with one foot on the front 
edge of each fully thirty seconds. It is 
a most hazardous feat and one which 
brought him rounds of applause. His 
act is good throughout and scored a well 
deserved success. 

Robb and Robertson presented "Back 
to School Days," in which they imper- 
sonate a boy and a girl. They open with 
some bright juvenile patter, which brings 
them many laughs. The girl then does 
a rope skipping clog dance and the man 
follows with a song. They close with a 
song and more dancing by the girl. 

Valentine Vox presented his always 

E leasing ventriloquial act and scored a big 
it. Vox is one of the best and neatest 
ventriloquists now before the public. He 
works his dummy well and, when throw- 
ing his voice, it is well nigh impossible 
to see any movement of bis lips. His 
finish, where the dummy joins in the 
chorus of a song rendered by Vox, is re- 
markable, as it sounds as though two 
voices were singing. 

Granville and Mack, man and woman, 
presented "In New Italy," in which they 
appear as Italian street musicians with a 
hurdy-gurdy organ. They have some com- 
edy patter which brings laughs, and for 
an encore the woman sang a solo in good 
voice. They received hearty applause that 
was well deserved. 

"In tbe Days of Long Ago" is an act 
in which five women and two men take 
part and give a mixture of singing and 
dancing. The men and two women, 
dressed in the style of sixty years ago, 
sing a medley of old time songs, mostly 
of the South. Then comes a soprano 
solo, and a duet by tbe men. Another 
Eoprano solo follows, the chorus of which 
is sung by the men and three women. A 
tenor solo follows which gives way to a 
toe dance of ye olden time. A minuet 
is then danced by two women, one of 
whom wears a man's court costume. 

The finale starts with a fancy dance 
by one of the "women, who is soon joined 
by the quartette in a song, a woman 
at the piano and another playing a vio- 
lin. Tbe whole makes an act out of the 
ordinary and one that is calculated to 
please most any audience. It earned 
hearty recognition. 

"Go Get- 'Em" Rogers opened with a 
song and went into a dance. He followed 
with a little talk and another song. As 
a finish, he did a rough eccentric dance 
which took him from one aide of tbe 
stage to the other. Rogers presents one 
of those rapid fire acts that holds atten- 
tion from start to finish and is always 
sure of winning hearty applause. 

Harry Brooks, Katberine Clinton & Co., 
two men and a woman, were seen in "The 
Minstrel Man" and were well liked. 
Brooks* characterization of the old circus 
man, who is living on the bounty of a 
hypocritical nephew, is artistic and never 
seems to lose its appeal. Tbe skit was 
given hearty recognition. 

Andy Lewis, assisted by Frankie James 
and Roy Lloyd, was seen in an up-to-the- 
minute revue which found much favor. 

The Three Bullowa Girls are called 
novelty wire artists, but they open their 
act with one of tbe trio rendering a song. 
She goes into a dance. Then follows a 
dance by all three girls. The work on 
the wire follows. E. W. 



CITY 

The Two Carltons nonchalantly go 
through a routine of gymnastics. Of the 
seven minutes they are on the stage, most 
of it is spent in pantomime which meant 
nothing and became tiresome. 

Goettler and Cox are reviewed under 
New Acts. 

Harrison Brockbank & Co. presented a 
sketch dealing with an episode in the 
Napoleonic war entitled "The Drummer 
of the 76th." Brockbank gave a good 
portrayal of the role of the Emperor, but 
the youngster who played the drummer 
had the featured part and scored a hit. 

The Universal News Weekly held at- 
tention with a showing of the news of 
the day. 

The Gardner Four, two men and two 
women, offered a routine of songs in 
which they exhibited good voices but 
lacked the necessary speed in getting 
over. Their stage presence, too, was stiff, 
and they did not appear at ease. Only 
tbe first number was sung in English. 

Leslie and Baker got but little applause 
for their songs and dances. The girl _•; 
too exuberant, and her lack of repression 
makes one tire of her work. The man is 
a good soft shoe dancer. The girl can 
turn cartwheels better than she can dance 
and is too demonstrative to be graceful. 

Walrod and Zell would make an Eng- 
lishman laugh at their impersonation of 
one. The one who first plays the silly 
British type was better liked when he 
played the piano and sang. The other bas 
the makings of a comedian. His work 
was liked. 

Revue de Vogue is reviewed under New 
Acts. . . S. W. 



THE JEFFERSON 

The George Davies Family gave an ex- 
cellent routine of acrobatic stunts, which 
met with approval. 

"Morlcy and the McCartney Sisters of- 
fered a singing act which is in great need 
of revision. The sisters are still singing 
tbe kiddie song tbey did before joining 
Miss Morley, and tbis proved to be the 
most popular part of the act. The big- 
gest handicap of the turn ia the attempt 
at comedy, which seems entirely out of 
place. All three of the girls sing well 
and, should they cut out tbe comedy, 
would be well suited to the small time 
houses. 

'Philip Austin and Leo Bailey, the syn- 
copated hotel bell boys, were well received 
with their songs and dances. They man- 
aged to get a number of laughs with tbeir 
comedy talk. 

Phil Dwyer & Co. presented a sketch 
entitled "My Dog Rover," which pleased 
as far as the animal impersonation of 
Dwyer was concerned. That was all tbe 
act was intended for. Tbe girl was pleas- 
ing and her songs and dances were liked. 
But Dwyer was a delight to the young- 
sters and could not fail to please the 
grown-ups, as well. 

Ryan and Riggs were accorded a gen- 
erous reception with their well-known 
skit entitled "The House Next Door." 
The man has a pleasing personality and 
tbe girl is likable. 

It was left to the Great Lipton, ven- 
triloquist, to really start things' going, 
and be claimed the laughing bit of the 
bill. The reception accorded him was tre- 
mendous and he took it modestly. 

The Black and White Review, a ver- 
sion of minstrelsy, was the applause hit 
and they were called upon for several 
encores. Tbe girls sing well and tbe three 
men, two in blackface, harmonize. The 
toe dancer went over big. 

Why Harry Breen, nut comedian, should 
be in closing position is a puzzle. He had 
things all his own way in spite of it. 
He could clean up in any position. He 
certainly handed out the right line of 
talk here, and bad the audience laughing 
continuously. S. W. 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




"CHILDREN OF FRANCE" 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style— Playlet. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting— Fun stage 

The curtain falls to the booming of 
cannon and a plain interior setting is 
shown with a window, a doorway, straw 
scattered about the floor and an ordinary 
kitchen table near the window. Three 
figures are discern able, a boy, a girl and 
a uniformed German soldier, doing guard 
duty at the doorway. 

A German officer appears and ac- 
cuses the boy and girl, who are brother 
and sister, of being spies for France. 
He reads bis opening lines in good Ger- 
man dialect, but, after about the fifth 
line, loses it entirely. He demands to 
know from the children how they came 
to get caught, and orders the soldier to 
search them at once. The latter finds 
nothing on the boy, but, in searching tbe 
girl, discovers that a heel in her wooden 
shoe is loose. This seemed to be ordinary 
melodrama and, naturally, the audience 
knew that the papers were in the beel. 
Tbe boy then tells the officer that it was 
he who drew the map found in the heel, 
and that he alone is responsible. Put to 
the test of drawing a similar map, the 
boy admits his deceit and promises to 
tell all if they will allow tbe girl to go 
free. 

The girl then shows weakness and in- 
sists that she should do the telling, and 
expose the master spy for whom they 
are working, but the boy persuades the 
officer that be can untangle the whole 
matter if allowed one minute with his 
Bister. In this minute, he extracts a 
promise from his sister that she will 
allow him to do the talking and be brave. 
Tbe boy then takes the officer into his 
confidence and accuses his sister of 
being in league with the master spy. 

The officer then calls the soldier, gives 
him his revolver, and tbe girl is taken 
out into tbe yard and supposedly shot. 
Demanding the name of tbe spy from 
the boy, tbe officer is then told that it is 
for him to find oot as he has had his 
aister shot in order to prevent her from 
revealing the true master. The officer, 
infuriated, orders the soldier to take the 
boy out to be shot also. But a shot is 
suddenly beard and tbe officer drops to 
the floor dead instead. 

The soldier then explains to the boy 
that he is also a spy for France and 
that, instead of shooting the sister, he 
shot a dog. He orders him to go out and 
get her and hurry away. He calln the 
guard, salutes, and tbe curtain descends 
as tbe "Marsellaise" is played. 

The act was written by Colgate 
Baker, and is plainly staged. The cast 
will eventually round out in its acting to 
make this act another playlet to be dis- 
cussed, as was "War Brldea." The audi- 
ence showed its approval by making the 
company take five curtains. 

S. L. H. 




BERNARD GRANVILLE 

Theatre — Colonial. 
Style — Bongs and recitations. 
Time — Twenty-two minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Bernard Granville, following along his 
usual lines, has a highly refined act, con- 
sisting of songs and recitations. All are 
rendered in true Granville style which 
assures their success. Granville, with 
his personality, natty appearance and 
wise choice of material, will carry off 
the honors on any bill. 

The only suggestion that this reviewer 
can offer is that the poem, "I'm Glad to 
See You," be used to open the act in- 
stead of following the opening song num- 
ber. As matters stand, it seems that 
Granville has hitched the cart before the 
horse, for the logical time to tell tbe 
audience that be is glad to see them is 
when he first enters. . H. G. 



LOUIS MANN & CO. 

Theatre — Royal. 
Style— Playlet. 
Tune — Thirty-five minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

One of the best playlets that vaude- 
ville has seen in many a day is "The 
Good for Nothing," written by Samuel 
Shipman and Clara LJpman. Louis 
Mann has wisely chosen it as his vehicle 
and, in the role of Jacob Marcovitch, 
gives a performance that will be remem- 
bered long after other vaudeville playlets 
and players are forgotten. 

Although the moral of the playlet is 
by no means new, the plot is rather un- 
usual and holds the interest except at 
the very end, where the playlet should 
be brought to a quicker close. After tbe 
climax, the end is a little long in coming. 
The moral of the piece may be summed 
up in a line delivered by Marcovitch 
which reads: "Greatness doesn't lay on 
your shirt, but in what's under your 
■ undershirt." In other words, it is a 
dramatic application of Burns' poem : 

The rank is but the guinea stamp; 
A man's a man for a' that. 

The acting in the playlet is excellent 
and so far above the average vaudeville 
playlet one is accustomed to seeing that 
there is no comparison. Pathos and 
comedy are blended artistically in a per- 
formance which savors of the quality 
found in big dramatic successes and not 
only is credit due to Louis Mann but 
also to his supporting players — John 
Macklan, Catherine Calhoun, Robert 
Powell and Ruby Hallier. H. G. 



WHITE AND HAIG 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Twenty-two minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

On a special setting with a daintily 
colored silk drop in "one" depicting the 
outside of a church, tbe curtain rone an 
they both stepped out in eccentric wed- 
ding costume. They danced to a medley 
of tunes In clever style. 

The next number showed a dock, where 
an ocean steamship was at anchor and, 
in eccentric sailor wardrobe, they danced 
a variation of the hornpipe. The follow- 
ing was a solo dance, wherein Miss Haig 
dressed in what appeared to be gold 
armor plate to represent Joan of Arc. 
She did this dance splendidly. 

The next setting showed "The Spirit of 
'76" with a fife and dram being heard 
off the stage. Then three men stepped 
forth, dressed exactly as In the original 
picture. George White was the little 
drummer boy and, while the fife and 
drum played, he offered a dandy routine 
of eccentric stepping. 

The following number was entitled 
"The Dance of the States" and a great 
cyclorama drop was shown, whereon a 
map of the United States appeared. 
Twenty boy scouts, dressed in khaki, 
came on and went through a short drill 
and, as the music grew louder. White, 
dressed in a white military suit, and 
Miss Haig, dressed as a Red Cross nurse, 
stepped out and did a series of dance 
steps. In this way there were steps 
from Alabama, Iowa, Indiana, etc., clos- 
ing the act to big applause. Tbe ap- 
proval of the act was so insistent thai 
White made a short sneech and an- 
nounced he and Miss Haig would offer 
"The Shim-me-sha-wabble" before tbe 
crowd would let them get away. The act 
is splendidly dressed, finely set, and a 
real dancing novelty. It is diversion, 
really worth while. S. L. H. 



NORA BAYES 

Theatre— Palace. 

Style — Singing. 
Time — Forty minutes. 
Setting —Full stage. 

In a simple summery frock, Nora 
Bayes stepped forth and worked forty 
minutes, singing dialect songs in her 
own inimitable manner. She is as- 
sisted by Harry Akst at the piano, and 
he filled in an interlude near the finish 
by rendering some "bines" in a classic 
manner. 

Her opening song carried a comedy 
lyric, sung in a rich Irish brogue. Then 
she rendered a corking good darky song 
in dialect, which was also of the comedy 
variety. Her next number was a medley 
of local old-time melodies in which she 
described New York City from the bat- 
tery to the Bronx, interpolating a routine 
of automobile talk and a line of chatter, 
for which she used various titles of cur- 
rent Broadway shows ss a foundation. 

She next announced that she would 
sing a song typifying the situation in 
the homes of all the warring nations. 
She entered carrying a candle, and sat 
down at a table, where she wrote a 
letter to her husband at the front, and 
indicated by a child's dress that she 
would shortly attain motherhood. The 
letter carried a pathetic story and a 
punch at the finish. This song was 
splendidly staged and was received with 
tumultuous applause. 

Her next number was an Indian reci- 
tation, Bcriously spoken, but with a great 
comedy vein throughout. 

Miss Bayes returned shortly and sang 
ber closing number, dressed in Colonial 
costume. 

Throughout the forty minutes there 
was not one second that dragged. 

S. L. H. 



DICKINSON & DEAGON 

Theatre — Colonial. 

Style — Man and girl. 

Setting— In one. 

Time — Twenty-two minutes. 

The man, a very neat appearing 
young fellow, begs a girl wltb a lisp to 
marry him. She is rather reluctant to 
accept, and her relnctancy and her lisp- 
ing furnish the comedy for several of 
the opening minutes of the act. 

Several songs, well rendered, follow. 

Tbe man then haa the stage to him- 
self and starts to recite, but is inter- 
rupted by tbe girl, who reappears, 
dressed as a child in pink rompers. She 
still retains her lisp and gives a wonder- 
ful "kid" take-off. Her efforts to sing 
while he accompanies her upon tbe 
piano are very funny, and will put any 
audience into good humor. After a little 
talk and original business, the pair make 
their final exit. H. G. 



EDWARD MARSHALL 

Theatre — Rialto, Chicago. 

Style — Cartoonist. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting In one. 

Edward Marshall, in what he terms 
"clever chalk talks," opens with a few 
patriotic sketches of illustrious men, and 
closes with a three colored one of George 
Washington. One is naturally moved to 
applause. But we see in his work the 
same faces as a half dozen years back, 
especially the Indian head. 

His offerings of the eggs and the cop 
are original, as far as tbe writer knows, 
but the "clothes line" one is old, he 
having done it when with the Great 
Raymond. In the "family" houses, 
Marshall will do best. F. C. 



JULIETTE DIKA 

Theatre— Eighty-first Street. 
Style — Singing comedienne. 
Time — Eighteen minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Miss Dika presents a good routine of 
songs and a beautiful array of gowns. 
Her personal appearance and carriage 
give her considerable prestige with tbe 
audience. 

Her opening cumber is one based on 
ber life, from childhood up, in tbe the- 
atrical business. The offering is novel. 
The second number, a ballad, is well 
presented. 

A character number that comes next 
■ is bound to be a pleasing one. It is 
well rendered and the lyrics are such as 
are always welcome with two-a-day 
audiences. This is followed by an Ital- 
ian number, which proved to be the 
most impressive of her offerings with 
tbe audience. Her closing song is one 
about France appealing to tbe Amer- 
icans. At this time, it is very appropri- 
ate a. tf. 



ALBERTINA RASCH & CO. 

Theatre— Eighty-first Street. 

Style — Classical dancing. I 

Time — Fourteen minute*. '. 

Setting— Full stage. ' 

Miss Rasch, assisted by Constantin 
Kobeleff and her eight Coryphees, offer* 
probably one of the beat turns of its 
kind presented this season. Tbe num- 
bers are all well assembled, none being 
too long and all being presented in a 
snappy and entertaining manner. 

This is rather unusual for this style 
of an act, and especially those staged 
by Miss Rasch in the past. The offering 
more than atones in wholesomeneas ana 
originality for her previous acta. They 
were mostly copys of other turns, but, 
in this one originality prevails. 

All of Miss Reach's solo numbers are 
presented with splendid detail and 
technique. She cannot be classified as 
another "Pavlowa" but deserves to be 
classed as a close runner-up to the 
premier dancer. Her variated dances, 
with Kobeleff, are most neatly done and 
proved very pleasing to the audience. 
Tbe workiof the eight coryphees is well 
executed and the setting they offer for 
Miss Rasch and her partner adds very 
much to the value of the turn. 

There 1b nothing spectacular in the 
style of the offering. Still, it possesses 
qualifications for engagements in two-a- 
day houses In the closing spot. A. U. 



KAUFMAN & LILLIAN 

Theatre— Harlem Opera House. 
Style— Man and girl. . J 

Time — Eleven minute*. 
Setting— In one. 

Tbe man sings a number, after which 
a girl of the "nut" type, enters and an- 
nounces that she is Tillie Korn and has 
come to take Lillian's place in the act. 
There is a little cross-fire talk and then 
she announces she is going to sing. 

The girl is not a natural "nut" 
comedienne and her attempts to be funny 
require great effort. 

Both re-appear later as an old-fash- 
ioned Southern couple and do a very ac- 
ceptable number, followed by a dance. 
Toward the end of the dance, the girl 
raises her hoop skirt above ber bead, re- 
vealing a comic pasteboard figure pinned 
to the inside of her skirt. It appears 
as if tbe figure is dancing. This is an 
original bit of work and makes a classy 
finish to the act. 

More numbers of the latter sort, and 
an elimination of the "nut" stuff, to- 
gether with the ineffective cross-fire talk 
would certainly enhance the value of 
this turn. H. G. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



Scoring a Decided Success at 

B. F. KEITH'S COLONIAL THEATRE 

This Week, June 1 1 



MOIVIEIR 





IN THEIR VAUDEVILLE VARIETY 



DIRECTION— FRED NIRDLINGER and PETE MACK 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



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Founded in 1&S3 by Frank Quten 

Published by the 

CLIPPER CORPORATION 

Orlud W. Vaughan... President and Secretary 

Frederick C Muller Treasurer 

1604 Broadway. New York 

Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORJLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR 

Paul C. Sweinhart, Managing -Editor 



NEW YORK, JUNE 13, 1917 



Entered June 24, 1879, at the Post Office at 
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Address All Communications to 

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Registered Cable Address. "AuTHOatTY.' 



fiu>> a Liberty Bond 

Every member of the theatrical pro- 
fession should by a Liberty Bond. And 
they all could if they made the effort. 
Moreover, it would be one sure way of 
proving their loyalty to the Stars and 
Stripes and their desire to bear their 
share of the burden which has been thrust 
upon this country. 

We know that many persons in the 
various branches of the profession have 
already purchased one or more of them, 
and we doubt not that many, many more 
intend to do so. But they all should. 

The actor has long been known for his 
willingness to help in an emergency. In 
the past, when disaster has visited a city 
or State and quick relief has been needed, 
theatrical benefits have been quickly ar- 
ranged as the surest and quickest .means 
of raising money, and the actor was the 
first to come forward with his services, 
and, frequently, with his money as well 
to do his "bit" for the relief of his fel- 
lowman in distress. 

In the past, when the death of an actor 
has left a widow in need, his fellow play- 
ers have rallied and sometimes a series of 
benefits .have been given and proceeds 
handed to the bereaved woman, so that 
her material wants, at least, would be 
satisfied. 

But now it is not a man or woman, a 
city or State that needs his aid. It is a 
vast country of over 100,000,000 souls, of 
which he is an integral part, that calls 
upon him. And the call is not made in 
the name of charity but in common sense 
and reason. 

He is not asked to give something for 
nothing, but asked to make an invest- 
ment, in the making of which he not 
alone shows his Americanism but he in- 
sures himself for the life of the bond of 
a good rate of interest. 

If every member of the profession 
should buy just one $50 bond, the lowest 
figure at which one can be purchased, the 
total would reach a very substantial sum. 

Many managers and players have pur- 
chased bonds to the amount of thousands 
of dollars each, and it is safe to predict 
that the sum total bought by the pro- 
fessional people will reach many times 
the above estimate. 

Let us hope it will. Let us hope that 
every' member of the profession in this 
cduntry will do his "bit" by purchasing 
a Liberty Bond. 



Answers to Queries 

R. N. C. — Hattie Williams is the sister 
of John D. Williams, the well known pro- 
ducer. 



C. G. — "Ben Hur" was originally pro- 
duced at the Broadway Theatre, New 
York. 



_ S. S. — Jessie Bonstelle and Bessie Bar- 
riscale were both formerly well known in 
stock. 



X. W. — James J. Corbett was a dramatic 
-tar under Wm. A. Brady's management 
fcr several seasons. 



E. C. — Yes, there was a play called "The 
Irish Arab." It was written for Bobby 
Caylor, who starred in it under Wm. A. 
Rrady's direction. 



E. R. T/ — John Mason received his stage 
training as a member of the old Boston 
Museum Stock Company with which he 
was connected for years. 



B. 0. C. — The Pawnee Bill Show never 
appeared at Madison Square Garden. Yon 
are thinking of the Buffalo BUI Wild West 
and Pawnee Bill Far East combined. 



Tbi CLirra cas be obtained wholesale and 
iitail, at our agents. Daw's Steamship Agency, 
17 Green Street. Charing Cross Road, London. 
w. C, England; Brentano's News Depot. 37 
Avenue de i 'Opera. Paris. France : Manila Book 
and Stationery Co.. 128 Escolta Street, Manila. 
P. I.: Gordon & Gotch. 123 Pitt. Sydney. N. 
S. W., Australia. 



T. L. — The first record we have of Wal- 
lace Eddinger in a prominent role was 
when he appeared in the title role of 
"Little Lord Fontleroy." 

W. S.— At the time H. V.' Donnelly had 
his stock company at the Murray Hill 
Theatre F. F. Proctor had stock companies 
at the Fifth Avenue and his 125th Street 
Theatres. 



L. L. — Henry Miller and Viola Allen 
were respectively leading man and lead- 
ing woman of the Empire Theatre Stock 
Co., New York. Wm. Faversham fol- 
lowed Mr. Miller. 



B. D. — Mrs. Fiske, before her marriage, 
was known to the stage as Minnie Maddern, 
and was recognized as one of the best in- 
genues of that day. She won her first real 
prominence in "Caprice." 



H. J. — E. H. Southern and wife. Julia 
Marlowe, announced their retirement from 
the stage last season, bnt it is not im- 
probable that they will occasionally appear 
for charitable purposes. 



M. R. — E. H. Sothern and James K. 
, Hackett were leading men at the old 
Lyceum Theatre on Fourth Ave. near 
Twenty-fourth Street. Thev were never 
associated with the Empire Theatre 
stock. Mr. Hackett followed Mr. Sothern 
when the latter became a star under 
the late Charles Frohman. 



J. D. — John L. Sullivan was among the 
first of the champion pugilists to have a 
play written to suit him, bnt for many 
years previous to that time it had been 
customary for each champion pugilist, as 
he won his spurs, to be engaged as a fea- 
ture attraction with a burlesque or vaude- 
ville company. Duncan C. Harrison man- 
aged Sullivan. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Henry E. Direy appeared in "Iolanthe." 

"Sweet Nellie Bawn" was published by 
Will Rossiter. 

New plays : "The Vandykes" : "The 
Fabricator" ; "The Minstrel." 

King Kaliko was produced at the Broad- 
way. New York, with Edwin Stevens in 
principal role. 

Dixon and Lang, Jennie Grovini, Carrie 
Ezier, were at Vacca's, Coney Island, N. 
Y. : Lillie Larkell and Billy Van played at 
Peny'g. 



Want* Broadway Stock 

Editor, New York Clipper: 

Dear Sir : Why doesn't some enterpris- 
ing New York manager open a Broadway 
theatre with a stock company such as we 
used to see at the Empire and the Lyceum, 
when the latter was at twenty-fourth Street 
and Fourth Avenue? 

In those houses, I used to see and ad- 
mire the work of such players as Henry 
Miller, Viola Allen, William Faversham. 
William H. Thompson, E. H. Sothern, 
James K. Hackett, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Walcot, Virginia Harned, Mary Manner- 
ins, Fritz Williams. Katherine Florence, 
Ferdinand Gottschalk, William H. Cromp- 
ton, Mrs. W. J. Jones, Bessie Tyree, Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Wbiffen and a host of 
others equally good. 

Charles and Daniel Frohman, who re- 
spectively directed those theatres, not only 
had the best talent but secured the best 
plays of the best authors, and the public 
showed its appreciation by supporting both 
houses. 

That stock is not dead is proved by the 
support extended to the popular price 
houses in this field, and at these houses 
are seen meritorious productions but these 
must, of necessity, be of old plays. 

Why not give us a first class Broadway 
stock company, where new plays of the 
best authors will receive premieres? 

London and Paris, each suffering from 
the effects of the three years' war, have 
first class stock companies. Why can't 
New York? 

Yours truly, 

Jadxe Mabcox. 
Tarrytown, N. Y., June 8. 1917. 



Wants Films Run Slower 

Editor, New York Clipper : 

Dear Sir: I went into a moving picture 
theatre in the Bronx last Sunday night 
to see a feature picture which had just 
come from a Broadway theatre. The pic- 
ture, my friends who had seen it told me, 
was a good one, but when' I saw it was 
shown so quickly that it made little im- 
pression on me. 

I have noticed before the rapidity with 
which these features are run off" when 
they reach the smaller houses, and espe- 
cially is this the case on Sundays, when 
they try to give as many showings as 
possible. 

The picture had been give an expensive 
and elaborate production, but it was 
treated abominably by the operator. 

There were several one-reel films 
shown, but I would .have been more than 
pleased to forego seeing those to see the 
picture properly. 

Producers who have spent so much 
money on a film should be more careful 
and not allow their picture to be spoiled 
in the showing. 

Very truly yours, 

E. Coleman. 

756 East 108th Street. 



Thanks Friends for Aid 

Editor, New York Clipper : 

Dear Sir — Some time ago when the No. 
2 advance car of the Barnum & Bailey 
Show was in Harrisburg, Pa., W. C. St, 
Clair, who is the car manager and the 
boys on the car, seeing my condition, and 
as I am an old-time showman, made up a 
donation for me. I wish to thank tbem 
one and all through the columns of "The 
Old Reliable." 

Those who contributed were W. C. St. 
Clair, J. P. Challcross. J. Conroy, J. R. 
Perkins, O. B. King, M. R. Cassidy, A. M. 
Ruland, C. Leverquc, G. Lamont, H. 
Glattly, E. Heatbcote. E. Dnnneger, N. 
Walson. A. Mulvihill, F. M. Gage, G. N. 
Lowry, and Ben Kravety. 
Yours truly, 

Geo. B. Beckxet. 
406 South 13th St., 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



DON'T MISS THE CLIPPER 

During Vacation 

THREE MONTHS FOR ONE DOLLAR 

Sent to Your Summer Address. 
Remit to CLIPPER CORPORATION, 1604 Broadway, N. Y. 



RIALT0 RATTLES 



CHARLES A. BIRD, OF C0UR1E! 
The Shuberts' Bird has flown away. 

LIGHT COMEDY 

And the inhabitants of Freeport said, 
"Let there be lights, and there were 
lights." 



JUST A FEW THOUSAND MILES 

Sol Lesser is en route from 'Frisco to 
New York again. He ought to buy a com- 
muter's ticket. 

HE'LL DELIVER THE PUNCH 

If Benny Leonard accepts a vaudeville 
booking his act should certainly possess 
the desired "punch." 

IT SOUNDS LOGICAL 

Sam Shipman has written a play en- 
titled 'The Man Who Pays." Perhaps the 
audience is to play the title role. 



WAVE THE RED FLAG 

Eugene Walter seems to be getting an- 
archistic tendencies. First came "The 
Knife" and now "The Assassin." 



A GREAT WAS ENDS 

The war is over. Xo. we're not talking 
about that little battle in Europe. Don't 
you know that Nora Baves is back at the 
Palace ? 



BEYOND IMAGINATION 

Someone mistook a picture of Joe 
Towle for Julian Eltinge. Imagine Towle, 
if you can, as a captivating young 
female! 



FALLS SHORT OF TITLE 

"Saturday to Monday" was withdrawn 
after Saturday night's performance at 
Washington, D. C. It didn't even live tip 
to its title. 



REWARD! 

Five thousand Mexican pesos will be 
paid for the apprehension of any vaude- 
ville singer who is not using a patriotic 
number in his act. 

HE'LL FIND HIMSELF A SOLDIER 

If Frank S. Colhtirn, who is walking to 
the Coast, succeeds none the worse for 
his hike, they'll probably grab him as ex- 
cellent timber for the army. 

ADVICE THAT MANY TAKE 

When you're short on real talent 

And your net seems to drag, 
You can still stop the show 
If you sing 'bout the flag. 

PLAYWRIGHT'S DEATH KNELL 

Harry Clarke anil Emily Ann Wellman, 
according to- press apent advices, have 
both joined the ranks of actor-play- 
wrights. If this thing keeps up, what 
chance will a mere playwright stand! 

A GRAVE HATTER 

When Tommy Gray went to register 
on June 5 he found the registration place 
was located in an undertaking parlor. 

"Want to register!" asked one of the 
clerks. 

"I came in to be measured for a coffin 
to be delivered to me in France," an- 
swered Tommy. 

TO LIVEN UP THE GAMBOL 

At the Lambs' Gambol we should sug- 
gest the following specialties: 

Stevenson, Massen & Company in a 
tragic playlet, "What Happened ' to the 
'Has Beens'*" 

Andrew Mack and David Belasro in 
their skit, "Lost in the Woods." 

Thos. A. Wise in an athletic posing act. 



WE WANT TO PUT YOU RIGHT 

Jay Packard has nothing to do with the 
car bearing his name. 

Lee Sbubert did not compose the Sere- 
nade. 

Betty Bond is not a new kind of Lib- 
erty Bond. 

Although Belle Baker is not related to 
"Home Run" Baker, she also J<now» how 
to make a hit. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



LONDON 



PARIS 




BERLIN 



SYDNEY 




London, Eng., Jane 2. 
Musical Lento is in town. 



The Lanns are touring South Africa. 

James Guidery has joined the colors. 

The Magic Crucible is in Maryport next 
week. 



Wal and Rosa were in Aberdeen this 
week. 

Carson and Bryan are on the Moss 
Tour. 



George Ross is doing well in South 
Africa. 



Betancourt is Btill on the Gulliver 
Circuit. ' 



The Ryewodes come to London week 
after next. 



Florrie Gallimore was at the Palace, 
Attercliffe. 



Harry Ray will be in Middlesbrough 
next week. 



Leonard Trend is to appear in "Step 
This Way." 

Cyril Clansy is now appearing with 
Wilkie Bard. 



George Hurste, of Sims and Hurste, is 
in the Navy. 

Loupe and Ladies come to Collins, Lon- 
don, June 11. 



Daisy Griff was at the Empire, Swan- 
sea, this week. 



George Miller was at the Empire, Kil- 
burn, this week. 



Dramatic critics will have to pay the 
theatre ticket tax. 



Lona Yale played the King's Theatre, 
Dundee, this week. 



"Under Cover" has nearly reached its 
175th performance. 

The Two Kortinis played the Palace, 
Chatham, this week. 

The Brothers Hay were at the Royal, 
Attercliffe, this week. 



Flora Cromer has taken Ethel Levey's 
place in '"Three Cheers." 

Kitty Stewart appeared at the Tivoli, 
Kew Brighton, this week. 



Phyllis and Giles played the Tivoli, 
New "Brighton, this week. 



Hnssar's Theatre at Llanelly is now 
known as the Hippodrome. 

Harry Blake plays the Hippodrome, 
Willesden. week after next. 



May Moore-Duprez closes to-night her 
second week at the Palladium. 



The Mafuzianz Manchu Troupe were at 
the Empire, Glasgow, this week. 

Josey Leyton sends word that she is 
making a hit in the L. T. V. halls. 



Helen Moray began last week a four 
weeks' tour of the L. T. V. halls. 



Michael E. Fitzgerald and his Club 
Juggling Girls are on the L. T. V. Tour. 



Stanley Russell, the boy ventriloquist, 
will make his London appearance shortly. 

Carrie Copeland closes to-night a good 
week at the Winter Garden, Morecambe. 



Little Dolly Varden returns to London 
next week to plav the Empire, Shepherd's 
Bush. 



Lucy Brennan, having concluded her 
London engagements, is now in the prov- 
inces. 



Sinclair Cotter is again playing the role 
of Emerald Bing in "The Bing Girls Are 
There." 



Hal. F. Miller, late of Miller and St. 
Juste, has joined the Royal Naval Air 
Service. 



The Four D'Ormondes, novelty cyclists, 
are at the Hippodrome, Willesden, week 
of June 11. 



Edgar Sullivan, the well known agent 
of Manchester, has been in France for 
nearly a year. 

Jim Nolan goes to the Palace, Warring- 
ton, and plays the Palace, Burnley, the 
week following. 

The strike of the omnibus drivers and 
conductors had its bad effect upon the- 
atre attendance. 



The cards are out announcing the en- 
gagement of Mabel Russell to Lieutenant 
Hylton Philipson. 



Loie Conn begins on June 11 a return 
engagement on the Stoll tour, opening at 
the London Coliseum. 



"Carminetta." a French operetta, will 
be C. B. Cochran's next offering at the 
Ambassador's Theatre. 



John Carmody, of the Hengler Bros., is 
now "somewhere in France." His Brother, 
William, is at Margate. 

Reginald Sackville-West is playing the 
juvenile lead in "Full Swing," the Pic- 
cadiltv Productions revue. 



Captain Charles Helmsloy, general man- 
ager for Sir George Alexander, has been 
invalided out of the service. 



Sid Howard, who is on the firing line in 
France, is preparing a new juggling act 
for production after the war. 



Herbert Waring is touring in a new 
play entitled "Magnificent Mac." It is a 
"crook" play by Oliver Twiss. 

May Starr plays the Empire, South 
Shields, next week, with the Empire, West 
Hartlepool, to follow June U. 



W. S. Pearce, lessee and manager of 
the Palace, Bath, has been granted a 
further exemption of three months. 

The Two Rascals and Jess Jacobson 
have volunteered their services to the 
English Legion of the American Flying 
Corps. 



Sam Barton begins on Monday his 
second week at the Palladium. The fol- 
lowing week he plays the Empress, 
Brixton. 



Robert Batt, of the Five Hollanders, 
has gone to the front.' His wife is now 
managing the act. 

Manager Percy H. Gallagher, of the New 



Theatre, Northampton, is continuing hia 
series of concerts for the soldiers at 
Duston War Hospital. 



The Four Clovelly Girls are in their 
last fortnight at the Olympia, Paris. They 
return to London week after next and 
play the Holborn Empire. 



Frederick Harrison is getting a fine bill 
together for the matinee to be given June 
26 at the Haymarket Theatre, in aid of 
the Metropolitan Hospital. 

Joe Elvin has purchased 100 seats for 
the Music Hall Boxing Competition, to 
be held on June 7. Elvin has also given 
a prize to be competed for. 



A free Cinema theatre, with a. seating 
capacity of 2,000, will be a . feature of 
Australia House, the Commonwealth 
Headquarters, now building. 

Margery Hast, daughter of William 
Hast, made her debut on the dramatic 
stage last week at the Princess Theatre, 
Manchester, in the new American comedy 
"Strings." 

Kitty Allen, daughter of Frank Allen, 
managing director of the Moss Empire, 
is to be married to Captain Claud Holland 
Russell, of the Royal Fusiliers, Special 
Reserve. 



Aimee Stewart, who is now playing the 
lead in Ernest Dottridge's farce, "My Son 
Sammy," has been secured as principal 
girl in Leon Salberg's Christmas panto- 
mime. 



"A Daughter of the Gods," a feature 
picture with Annette Kellermann as the 
star, was presented last week at the Stoll 
Picture Theatre, under the direction of 
C. B. Cochran. 



Sixty-two employees of the Empire, 
Shepherds Bush, have joined the colors, 
and Manager Bertram lies, of that house, 
has been instrumental in collecting 
£20,000 for war purposes. 



Kennedy Jones has engaged Harry 
Goodson to manage the advertising cam- 
paign in the theatres to urge food econ- 
omy. The theatres, music balls and Kine- 
mas will be handled in turn. 



Arthur Carlton, who is the Mayor of 
Worcester, as well as proprietor "of the 
New Theatre Royal, of that city, is pre- 
senting, at his own expense, a "Roll of 
Honor" certificate to the relatives of 
each fallen Worcester soldier or sailor. 



Arthur Aldin (of Arthur Aldin, Ltd.) 
has decided not only to reduce the prices 
of admission to the Prince of Wales The- 
atre, but will, himself, pay the Entertain- 
ment Tax on all tickets. His prices will 
be, inclusive of tax, eight shillings for 
seats in the stalls, five shillings for circle 
seats, and so on. 



The engagement of "The Aristocrat" 
came to an end at the St. James Theatre 
last night. To-night Sir George Alex- 
ander 'will produce "Sheila" with a com- 
pany including William Farren, W. Stack, 
W. Home, Helen Rous, Stella Mervyn 
Campbell, Gwendolen Floyd, Joyce Carey 
and Fay Compton. 



Albert de Courville has renamed his 
revue again. He originally called it 
"Good Bve-ee." Then he called it "Chit 
Chat." Its latest name is "Smile." It 
is to he produced at the Garrick, but if 
the production is hurried up we may ex- 
pect to hear that its name has been 
changed to "Wrinkles." 



WILL DO THEIR "BIT" 

London, Eng., June 7. — American per- 
formers in England have made ready re- 
sponse to the call for volunteers. The Two 
Rascals and Jacobson soon start for 
France. Harry Radford has not only en- 
listed, but has offered the use of bis office 
and clerical staff. For recruiting pur- 
poses the American society in London has 
taken quarters at the Connaught Rooms, 
Great Queen Street, Kingsway. 



TO PRODUCE "THE JEFFERSONS" 

London, Eng., June 9. — Wilfred Shine 
has accepted for production "The Jeffer- 
sons," a Lancashire comedy by Vincent 
Douglass, a seventeen-year-old playright, 
who has written several one-act plays. The 
production will occur June 25 at the Win- 
ter Gardens, New Brighton. Shine will 
play the leading role. 



EXTENDING FULLER CIRCUIT 
Sydney, Aus., June 5. — The Fuller 
Vaudeville Circuit of Australia and New- 
Zealand has been extended by the addi- 
tion of theatres in Hobart, Launoeston, 
Richmond, Geelong, Port Pirie, Port Ade- 
laide, Bendigo, Invercargill, Palmerston 
North, Napier, Wahganui. Gisborne and 
Newtown. 



BERNSTEIN PLAY CAPTURES PARIS 

Pabis, Fr., June 8. — One of the biggest 
theatrical events in this city since the 
beginning of the war is Henri Bernstein's 
ploy "L'Elevation." which is being pres- 
ented at the Comedie Francaise. The play, 
which is intensely dramatic, ranks with 
the best works the French stage has ever 
seen. 



DORIS KEANE ACTS FOR CHARITY 

London, Eng., June 6. — Doris Keane 
gave a special matinee yesterday in aid of 
Lady Paget's Blinded Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Fund, which netted a good sized sum. 
Souvenir photographs of leading actresses 
were sold by many well-known society 
ladies. 



LAMBERT TERRY SCORES HIT 

London, Eng., June 6. — Lambert Terry, 
son of Terry and Lambert, the popular 
variety team, who is playing one of the 
leading roles in "Strings," the American- 
'Italiau comedy, presented in the provinces 
last week, has made one of the big hits of 
the show. 



BRANSBY WILLIAMS' SON MISSING 

London, Eng., June 6. — Captain W. C. 
Bransby Williams, son of Bransby Will- 
iams has been reported missing. Williams 
was only nineteen years of age, but was 
, senior captain of his squadron and for 
some time had been acting-major. 



MAGICIAN TO MANAGE THEATRE 

London, Eng., June 7. — Rameses, the 
Egyptian magician, has acquired the lease 
of the Empire Theatre. Southend. He 
plans to make several alterations and re- 
decorate the interior and will open it on 
July 16 as a dramatic house. 



PARIS MUSICIANS ASK MORE PAY 

Paris, Fr., June 7. — The musiejans have 
again demanded an increase, but no ac- 
tion is expected till Fall as many 'of the 
resorts, at the first indication of real hot 
weather, will close for the Summer. 



FORD AND TRULY TO RETURN 

London, Eng.. June 9. — Ford, of Ford 
nnd Truly, has signed contracts to appear 
for Martin Beck and they will return to 
the United States next month to play a 
tour of the Orpheum Circuit. 



MARNAC IS COMING TO NEW YORK 

Pakis, Fr., June 9. — James Marnac has 
signed contracts to appear in New York 
next Winter.' 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




TWO NEW CO.'S 

OPENING IN 

DENVER 



TO OPERATE AT AMUSEMENT PKS. 



Denver, Colo., June 9. — When the two 
companies which are scheduled to open 
their seasons shortly at the amusement 
parks here, are installed in their respect- 
ive theatres there will be three stock com- 
panies in this city. 

A musical comedy company which has 
been in process of organization in Chi- 
cago arrived this week for rehearsals and 
will open tomorrow at the Casino Theatre, 
Lakeside Park. It will be known as the 
Lakeside Musical Comedy Co., and the 
opening attraction wil be "Bright Eyes." 
The company will be under the manage- 
ment of Walter Arrington, and all pro- 
ductions will be staged under the per- 
sonal direction of Charles Le Roy. Sam 
Orton is the musical director. 

The company includes Mabel La Couvre, 
leading ingenue; Frederick Dunham, lead- 
ing juvenile; Edith Lawrence, ingenue; 
Kmmett Vagan, juvenile; Millie Corbin 
White, contralto; Lee Johnstone, char- 
acter woman; Elmer Jerome, tenor; Fran- 
cis Pierlot, Jack O'Malley and a chorus of 
twenty-two people. 

The theatre at Elitch's Garden has been 
leased to Joseph D. Glass, who will in- 
stall a stock company, opening June 17. 
Glass will put on a repertoire of dra- 
matic plays with Audra ' Alden and Wil- 
liam Winterhoff in the leading roles. 

The company at the Denham Theatre 
continues with several changes. Tonight 
marks the end of the long regime of O. D. 
Woodward as director of the Denham 
Stock Co. He will be succeeded by Wil- 
liam Webb, director of the present com- 
pany at the house, who will commence 
his duties tomorrow. Woodward has 
been in charge of the company for one 
hundred and eighty-six continuous weeks. 
He will remain in the city until the mid- 
dle of August, conducting a dramatic 
school of which he is the head. 

With the advent of Webb as director, 
Clara Louise Moore will become leading 
ladv of the com|>anv. opening in "Three 
Twins." 



FLORENCE PLAYERS OPEN 

Fayette. O., June 9. — The Florence 
Players, under the management of Ilicher, 
Sixby and Scott, opened their Summer sea- 
son here recently, under canvas. Edwin 
Weever is director and leading man and 
is producing his own plays, including 
"They Are My People," "A Carolina 
Belle." "Destiny," "An African Aviator," 
"Soul Mates," "A 33rd Degree Mason," 
and "The Rajah of Dampoor." The ros- 
ter of the company includes Marion L. 
Franklin, leads; Billie Hobart, ingenue; 
Hallie Tarver. characters ; Anna Sizer, 
general business : Baby Gertrude, child 
parts: Myrtle Diuipke and Florence Sixby, 
utility : Frank M. Scott, characters ; Ed- 
win Weever, leads ; Burleigh Cash, 
heavies ; Tom Saunders, comedian ; Terry 
Lane, characters, and Walter Ross, char- 
acters. 



HASTINGS TO OPEN CO. IN TULSA 

Joplin. Mo., June 11. — The Incom- 
parable Grand Theatre Stock Co., under 
the management of Cliff Hastings, will 
open. at the Grand Theatre, Tulsa, Okla., 
Sept. 2, headed by Ella Kramer, and an 
all-star cast, playing nothing but late 
stock releases. The company will be 
under the direction of Louis Powell and 
Cliff Hastings. Cliff Hastings is now 
spending his vacation in and around 
Joplin and making his headquarters at 
the home of his wife's father. 



PLAYERS OPENING AT PARK 

Boston. June li. — The Lexington Park 
Players will open their third season at Lex- 
ington Park, next Monday, in "The Gov- 
ernor's Wife." The stage direction will be, 
ns in the past two seasons, under the per- 
sonal supervision of Joseph Thayer. Lex- 
ington Park is this season under the mini- 
agement of Elmer J. Walters. 



FITCHBURG PARK TO HAVE CO. 

FrrcHBURO, Mass.. June 11. — The Al- 
bert Lando Stock Co. will open its third 
season at Wbalom Park, next Monday. 
The cast will include Richard Morgan, 
Lucius Fairehild, Edward Barney. Frank- 
l.vn Fox, Bert Kellers, Gladys Macleod. 
Henrietta Bagley, Margaret Slnven and 
Marion White. 



MARY YOUNG GOES TO FRANCE 

Boston, June 11. — Mary Young, wife of 
John Craig, manager of the Castle Square 
Theatre, left this city Friday for France 
to sec her two sons, who went abroad with 
one of the Harvard units in February to 
become ambulance drivers. 



INDIANAPOLIS CO. HAS NEW PLAY 

Indianapolis. Ind., June 9. — The Stu- 
art Walker Players at the Murat Theatre 
will present a new play next week. It will 
be "Seventeen," dramatized from the novel 
of the same name by Booth Xarkington. 



NEW CO. AT NEW BEDFORD 

New Bedford, Mass.. June 9. — The 
Marcus Musical Stock Co. opened an en- 
gagement at the Xew Bedford Theatre 
Monday in "The College Widow." The 
company includes Mike Sacks, DnTell and 
Abbott. Bob Alexander. Mr. and Mrs. But- 
ler, Alice Wallace, prima donna ; Elsie De- 
Foe, contralto ; Dave Harris, Bob Lane, 
' Jack Cleary, Bee Miller, Richie Covey and 
May Thayer. 



UNION HILL MAKING TRYOUT 

"After Office Hours," the new play by 
Ray Foster which was scheduled to be pro- 
duced by the stock company at the Hud- 
son Theatre, Union Hill, last week, was 
postponed and the company is presenting it 
this week. William Wood, in conjunction 
with Arthur C. Alston, is making the pro- 
duction. 

"JUBILEE DRAX" TO CONTINUE 

Boston, June 11. — "Mr. Jubilee Drax," 
by William Devereaux, which was given 
its first performance in this country by 
the Craig Players at the Castle Square 
Theatre, has met with such favor that 
the engagement has been extended. 



WOODRUFF QUITS STOCK 

Montreal. Q.. Can., June 11. — Edward 
Woodruff, leading man of the Orpheum 
Players, has left the company to take an 
important position with one of the largest 
paper firms in the Cnited States. 



GERTRUDE ROBERTS RESTING 
Harwichpoxt. Mass., June 11. — Ger- 
trude Roberts has returned to her Sum- 
mer cottage, preparatory to the annual 
tour of her company through the Sum- 
mer resorts of Cape Cod. 



JOIN COMPANY AT AKRON 

Akron. O., June 9. — Wm. Harris, 
builder, L. R. Frantzinger, scenic artist, 
and Dan McGowan, carpenter, joined the 
Feiber & Shea Slock Co. at the Colonial. 



GRANT, BROOKLYN, CLOSED 

The Travers-Douglas Stock Co. has 
closed at the Grand Opera House, 
Brooklvn. 



WILLIAMS IN WILKES-BARRE 

Wilkes-Barre. Pa.. June 11. — Robert 
Williams joins the Foli Stock Co. to- 
night, opening in "The Silent Witness." 



COMPANY AT 

NEWARK HAS 

ROW 

STUART ROBBINS AND WIFE OUT 



Newark, X. J.. June 7. — A row that 
has resulted in Stuart Robbins and his 
wife, Mabel Carruthcrs, leaving the cast 
of the stock company playing at the Or- 
pheum Theatre here, took place last 
Saturday night, when Robbins and Miss 
Carruthers, according to the management, 
held the curtain for five minutes and re- 
fused to go on at all, until $10, which 
they claimed was dne, was paid. 

The trouble started a week ago, when 
Manager Herman H. Moss decided to put 
on "On Trial." Rehearsals were called 
and carried on for several days and Rob- 
bins and Miss Carruthers were engaged to 
play the leads. It was then found, how- 
ever, that "On Trial" could not be used, 
owing to the fact that a revolving stage 
could not be contrived. The rehearsals 
were then discontinued. 

During the time that they were on, 
though, Robbins, according to the manage- 
ment, drew $10, which was taken out last 
week when he drew his salary for the 
week's performance in "The Woman He 
Married." He objected and demanded the 
payment of the money, but the manage- 
ment was not inclined to comply. 

He said no more until it came time for 
the performance to start. Then, however, 
there was something doing. Robbins re- 
fused to go on, tbe management declares. 
And Miss Carruthers joined him in the 
stand he took. As both were playing big 
roles in the piece, the curtain could not 
rise without them. 

Several minutes passed, and the audi- 
ence began to exhibit signs of impatience. 
The management repeatedly requested 
that Robbins and Miss Carruthers go on, 
hut they refused. The situation became 
really alarming. 

Finally, as the only way out, the $10 
was paid and the curtain went up five 
minutes late. 



HORNE CO. GOING TO AKRON 

Akron, June 9. — The Col. F. I*. Home 
Stock Co. at the Music Hall, closes for the 
season to-night and will open Monday nt 
Idora Park. Younpsiown in "Brewster's 
Millions." 



MILWAUKEE CO. CHANGES HOUSE 

Milwaukee. Wis.. June 9.— The stock 
company which has been holding forth at 
the Shuhert Theatre moved to the Ma- 
jestic Theatre Monday. 



POWELL CO. IS AT LANSING 

Lansing. Mich.. June S. — The Halton 
Powell Stock Co. will o|»en an engagement 
at the Bijou Theatre next Sunday for the 
Summer season. 



TO TRY CO. IN TERRE HAUTE 

Terre Haute. Ind.. June 7. — Manager 
Ed. Galligan. of the Grand Theatre, in- 
tends to try out a Summer stock company. 



WINNIPEG CO. CLOSES 

Winnipeg. Can.. June 8.— The W. B. 
Lawrence stock company nt the Winnipeg 
Theatre closed its 'season Inst Saturday. 



COMPANY AT ELMIRA OPENS 
Elvira, X. Y.. June 11. — The stock 
company nt Rorick's Glen Park is sched- 
uled to open to-night. 



"BOSOM FRIENDS" FOR STOCK 

"Bosom Friends" is the latest release for 
use in stock. 



BILLY ALLEN CO. CAST 

Akron. O., June 9.— The Billy Allen 
Co.. which opened at Lakeside Pnk Ca- 
sino recently, has in its cast : Billy Allen. 
Hal L. Kiter, Jack MeClonuau. Austin 
Goetz. Hugh Wright. Eddie Gooduinu. 
Clms. Pullen, Luella Fallen. Mattie 
Quinn, Kleanor Carlcton, File Duffy. Kilua 
Bates. Tommie Woodhall. Kllen Butes. 
Bobbie Evans, Edna Troutmnn. Alice 
Mcnde, Mabel Sims. Myrtle Hoffman, 
Jessie Sims, Alice Feljmnu. Lucille Cluy- 
ton. Lillian Skcdder. Lelin Sullivan and 
Lillian Bedforil. 



WAR PLAY IN SCHENECTADY 

Schenectady, X. Y.. June ft — A new 
war play is to be presented by the 
stock company at the Van Curler 
Opera House next week, which is as yet 
unmmied. It is by Richard Clarke and 
it is planned to gi've the play a Broad- 
way production early next season. In 
the east are Mae Desmond, Frank 
Fielder, Franklin George, Millie Freeman, 
Guy Hitner, Olga Worth, Lillian Biiim and 
Albert Hickev. 



CORT TAKES OVER STOCK HOUSE 

Portland. Ore., June 10.— The Alcazar 
Players closed their season at the Raker 
Theatre last night, presenting "The tJirl 
in the Taxi." The house has been takeu 
over by John Cort for mad attractions. 
The stock company will return for a pawt- 
season engagement next week in "Rip Van 
Winkle," while Cort attractions are reach- 
ing Portland through usual hooking chan- 
nels. 



NEWARK TRYING OUT NEW PLAY 
Newark, X. J., June 11. — "The Voice 
Within," a new piny in four acts, by Henry 
Rashford, is being presented this week for 

the first time on auy stage by the stork 
company at the Orpheum Theatre. If it 
meets with favor it will be given n Broad- 
way production next season, with Alice 
Fleming as star. 



MISS VAN WALDREN IN ST. PAUL 

St. Paul, Minn.. June 9. — Ethel Vnn 
Waldren returned to the cast of the Shu- 
hert Stock Co. at the Shuhert Theatre, 
Monday, ns lending woman in "The Silent 
Witnesx." She succeeds Isabel Randolph, 
who retired for the Summer because of ill 
health. ____^ 

TOMS OPENING IN VANCOUVER 

Vancouver, Cnu.. June 10. — Robert 
Toms will open in stock at the Valencia 
Theatre a week from tomorrow. "His 
Majesty Bunker Bean" will be his 
initial attraction. 



SUE MacMANAMY COMING EAST 

Los Angeles, June !).— Sue Mac 
Maiuimy closes tonight with the MoruHC" 
Stock Co. in "Common Clay," and will 
leave for Xew York immediately. She 
is contemplating going into motion 
pictures. 

ADA MEADE APPEARS IN STOCK 

Providence, R. I.. June 11. — Ada 
Meade will make her debut in stock to- 
day with the Lyric Light Opera Co. at 
the Providence Opera House, opening in 
"The Prince of Pilsen." 



NEWCOMERS IN TOLER CO. 
Portland, Me., June 9. — Belle D'Arcy 
and Mabel Craig will be added to the cast 
of the Sidney Toler Stock Co., opening 
Monday in "Rich Man — Poor Man." 



FRANKLYN CO., WORCESTER, ENDS 

Worcester, Mass., June 11.— The Man- 
rice Frnnklyn Stock Co., which opened at 
the Worcester Theatre recently, terminates 
its engagement Saturday night. 



Stock and Repertoire Continued on page 23 



ABORNS LEAVE NEWARK 

Newark, X. J.. June 10. — The Aborn 
Opera Co. closed its season here Satur- 
day night with "The Princess Pat." 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 




LUKEN AND WIFE 

KILLED IN 

ACCIDENT 

TRAIN STRIKES THEIR AUTO 



Pottstown, Pa.. June 9. — Harry J. Lu- 
ben, proprietor of Luken's Carnival Co., 
noted acrobat and animal trainer, and his 
wife, professionally known as Mile. Eve- 
lyn, were killed in an automobile accident 
which occurred last Wednesday afternoon 
at the lower crossing of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, at Monocacy. Mr. and Mrs. 
Updegraff, well known in theatrical cir- 
cles, who were in the car with the Lukens, 
were seriously injured. They were all 
residents of Reading. 

Luken's carnival was showing in Potts- 
town this week, and he and his wife left 
the grounds Wednesday morning for Read- 
ing, where they were joined by Mr. and 
Mrs. Updegraff. The motorists left Read- 
ing for Pottstown shortly before four 
o'clock and, attempting to cross the rail- 
road tracks at the Monocacy public road, 
the car waa struck by an express train 
which left Reading at four o'clock. 

Mrs. Luken was killed almost instantly. 
She was thrown about twenty-five feet. 
Her head struck an iron post, breaking 
her neck. Her right shoulder was crushed, 
her left wrist and right limb broken, the 
left side of her body was bruised and splin- 
tered ribs penetrated her -lung. She was 
n well-known wild animal tamer. 

Luken died in the Pottstown hospital 
two hours after the accident. His right 
leg was almost severed and he received in- 
ternal injuries. 

UpdegTaff was in his first season with 
the Luken carnival, of which he was busi- 
ness manager. Both he and his wife are 
expected to recover. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad officials In 
Rending issued the statement that "the 
view of the track from the public road 
was not obstructed. It is thought that the 
parties did not realize the speed of the 
train and believed they could dear the 
track. The engineer claims he Mew the 
whistle and the bell of the engine was 
ringing." 

Deputy Coroner Schick, of Rending, 
was early on the scene and took the testi- 
mony of several witnesses. According to 
Mrs. Miller, who lives near the Monocacy 
crossing, she heard neither the electric 
warning hell at the crossing, nor the 
whistle of the engine. Another witness, 
living in the house ndjoining Mrs. Miller, 
said she heard the train coming and saw 
the engine strike the car. She clnims thnt 
she heard the engineer sound a warning 
signal on his engine hut thnt she did not 
hear the electric bell. 

Neither the ensineer nor the fireman 
knew anything of the accident until they 
felt the imr.nct of the trMn against the 
machine, they snid. 

Ont of respect to Mr. Luken. the car- 
nival employees closed the show on the day 
of his funeral and went to Reading to 
attend the obsequies. 



LYNCHBURG WANTS FAIR HELD 

Lynchbueg, Va., June 9. — Rescinding 
their action of two week? ago, when the 
directors of the Interstate Fair Associa- 
tion called off the thirteenth annual ex- 
hibition, scheduled to be held in this city 
from October 2 to the 5th, the officials at 
a specially called ' meeting, decided last 
week to reconsider their plans, with the 
result that sentiment was almost unani- 
mous to back the association again this 
season, in spite of unfavorable conditions 
incidental to the war. 

As a result of the first decision of the 
board, many adverse comments were heard 
from a number of sources and it was gen- 
erally called an unwise move on the part 
of the directors. Secretary Frank A. Love- 
lock, dean of Virginia fair secretaries, is 
busily engaged completing the preparations 
for the event, which was suddenly halted 
two weeks ago by the decision of the di- 
rectors to abandon the fair this season. 



CIRCUS MEN BUY FILM 

Chicago, June 12. — -John R. 'Warren, 
part owner of the Hasenbeck-Wallnce Cir- 
cus and Fred Clarke, president of the 
Riverside Show Printing Co.. in associa- 
tion with their partners in the circus busi- 
ness, the racing world and the United Fairs 
Booking Association, have bought from the 
Arrow Film Corporation "The Deemster" 
for the States of Illinois. Indiann and 
Wisconsin and have opened offices here. 



YOUNG & MARSH JOIN SPARKS 

Patnesvtlle. O.. June 0. — Young and 
Marsh, comedy acrobats, have left the La 
Tena's Circus and joined the Sparks Show. 



HEBER SHOW GIVES BENEFIT 

Columbus, ()., June 9. — Heber Bros. 
Greater Show gave two performances at 
Indianola Park, last Saturday, for the 
benefit of The Children's Hospital. Mayor 
Karb officiated as equestrian director and 
one hundred leading society women took 
part in the opening extravaganza, solo and 
ensemble dances. Twenty-five prominent 
business and professional men acted as 
clowns in several numbers. The Fourth 
Regiment Band of thirty pieces rendered 
music during the performances. 



MAN SUES FOR SNAKE BITE 

Ferdinand Martringham began suit last 
week in the Supreme Court against Fred- 
erick Kopper, Jr., of the Harlem Amuse- 
ment Palace, alleging that a rattlesnake 
owned by the defendant, which was sup- 
posed to heve had its fangs removed and 
to be harmless, bit him and that as a re- 
sult of the bite he was in the hospital for 
some time. Matringham claims he was en- 
gaged to exhibit the snake in December, 
1916, and four days later the snake Lit 
him. He asks $5,000 damages. 



BLOWDOWN DELAYS B. & B. 

Fairmont, W. Va., June 9. — Owing to 
the blow down which the Barnum & Bailey 
Circns experienced at the TJniontown, Pa. 
stand, the show was late in arriving here 
Inst Saturday and, with repairs necessary, 
it was out of the question to show in the 
afternoon. The night performance was 
given, although it did not get started until 
nearly 9 o'clock. The aerial numbers had 
to be cut out owing to the twisting of the 
apparatus at Uniontown, which necessi- 
tated new parts. 



ACROBAT HURT AT CONEY 

Robert Susini, an acrobat, while rehears- 
ing a new act for Pawnee Bill's Wild 
West Show at Luna Park, last week, 
bounced out of the life net and landed 
unconscious on the stone pavement. He 
was taken to the Coney Island Hospital, 
but is now at home. It is believed bis 
back is broken. 



BUFFALO BILL 

SHOW IS 

SOLD 

WILLARD MAY BE SILENT OWNER 



U. S. TAKES ALLENTOWN GROUNDS 
Aixentown, Pa.. June 6. — The govern- 
ment has taken over the fair grounds in 
this city for troop training purposes, and, 
as a consequence, the Allentown Fair will 
be abandoned this year as the fair people 
do not care to go to the expense of laying 
out new grounds. 

READING FAIR DATE SWITCHED 

Reading. Pa.. June C. — Owing to the 
calling off of the Allentown Fair the date 
of the Reading Fair has been switched 
from the week of September 10 to the 
week of September 17, the date formerly 
fixed for Allentown. 



LIMA TO HOLD CENTENNIAL 

Lima, O.. June 9.- — A Centennial Cele- 
bration, to be held Aug. 1 to 6, has been 
endorsed by the local Chamber of Com- 
merce. 



Habtfobd, Conn., June 10. — Edward 
and George Arlington have disposed of 
their circus and Buffalo Bill Wild West 
Show to Archer Banker, of Salina. Kan., 
for a reported price of $105,000. Banker 
is a life-long friend of Jess Willard, who is 
a feature of the show this season. 

It has been stated among circus men 
that the show has not been doing as big a 
business this season as in former years 
and it has been rumored that the Ariing- 
tons were finding the show to be a losing, 
proposition after they bad paid Willard his 
contracted share of the profits. The 
Arlingtons claim that WiUard's contract 
called for a salary of $90,000 and a fifty 
per cent, share of the profits. As a result 
some showmen seem inclined to believe that 
the show was turned over to Willard. 

The same name and staff will be main- 
tained as heretofore, and Eddie Arlington 
will continue to do the routing. 

Jess Willard will remain as the stellar 
attraction. 

At the New York offices of the Arling- 
tons, the only advice that bad been received 
when The Clipper made inquiries was to 
the effect that "the show had been turned 
over to Willard." 



CIRCUSES ESCAPE NEW TAX 

Washington, June 9. — Circuses have 
been hard hit these days by the requisites 
of the war and are, therefore, delighted 
at the latest action of the Senate Finance 
Committee, in adopting an amendment to 
the War Tax bill, providing for the ex- 
emption of circuses and theatrical com- 
panies from the mileage and transporta- 
tion tax if they own their own railway 
rolling stock. 

The proposed transportation tax is 8 
per cent, on freight and 5 per cent, on 
passenger travel, but those circuses and 
theatrical companies that own their own 
railway cars will not have to pay It. 



REBUILT BOSTON PARK OPENS 

Boston, June 10. — Paragon Park, at 
Xastasket Beach, which was destroyed by 
fire last Fall, has been entirely rebuilt, and 
lias opened for the Summer, under the man- 
agement of George A. Dodge. The fea- 
ture this year is the Giant Coaster. Mill 
Rapids is one of the new rides. Among. 
the free attractions are Aider's diving elk 
and Mae Eccleston, high diver. Mace 
Gay's Concert Band furnished the music. 



PARKER SHOW IN LOGANSPORT 

Loganspobt. Ind., June 10. — Parker's 
Greatest Shows appeared in this city last 
week, under the auspices of the Boy Scouts, 
and while heavy rains greeted the attrac- 
tions on the first two nights, the attendance 
during the rest of the week was so excep- 
tionally big that a good week was recorded. 



WIFE DIDN'T KNOW CRAGER 

George Crager, one-time manager of Buf- 
falo Bill's Wild West Shows, who, dur- 
ing the last fourteen years, has been tour- 
ing Europe as a war correspondent and 
circns manager, was haled into the Do- 
mestic Relations Court last Friday, 
charged by his wife, Mrs. Julia Crager, 
with non-support. Mrs. Crager did n u t 
recognize her husband, whom she had not 
seen in fourteen years, but he admitted his 
identity and expressed a willingness to sup- 
port her. He said his means were strained 
. at present and Magistrate Cornell directed 
him to pay bis wife $3 a week. Crager 
produced a cash bond of $156 to insure pay- 
ments for one year. 



BLEI BOOKS FAIRS 

General Agent Felix Blei contracted to 
play the Murphy's American Shows at the 
Commerce Four County Fair. Commerce, 
Ga., week of Oct. 8, 'and the Emanuel 
County Fair in Swainsboro, Ga., week of 
Oct. 15. Margaret Quincy, the champion 
high diver, will be the free attraction. 

BISHOP HURT IN ACCIDENT 
Summit, N. J., June 9. — Frank Bishop, 
racer in the motordrome with the Benson 
& Berger Shows, sustained a fractured 
shoulder bone and had some ligaments in 
his arm torn, when his motorcycle slipped 
while performing. 



CONEY FREAKS REGISTER 

The freaks of the side shows at Coney 
Island registered for military draft June 
5. Among them were Jack Wilson, weigh- 
ing 620 pounds; Baron Pautti, weighing 
27 pounds, and standing just 27 inches in 
height; Eddie Masher, known as the 
skeleton dude, nearly 5 feet tall and 
weighing 38 pounds; Amok, head hunter 
from the Philippines, and several Indians 
and one Mexican from the Pawnee Bill 
Wild West Show at Luna Park. 



VAN VALKENBERG AT FARM 

Patebson, N. J., June 11. — Dixon Van 
Valkenberg, who did the publicity work 
for the Empire Theatre, where the Wini- 
fred St. 'Claire Co. recently closed, has 
gone to bis fresh air farm in Hagerstown, 
Mil., for the Summer. Geo. N. Brown, the 
champion walker of the world, and William 
Morgan Hannon, scenario editor and direc- 
tor of the Nolo Film Co., accompanied him. 



LUDLOW LAGOON LEASED 

Ludlow, Ky„ June 9. — Negotiations for 
the lease of the Lagoon, the Summer park 
here, have at last come to a head. H. K. 
Shockley, Frederick W. Stroutman and 
Louis Mentel have secured the lease of 
the amusement resort from the Common- 
wealth Amusement Co. and the opening 
date is set for June 16. Charles Zuber 
is handling the press work. 



CARNIVAL EMPLOYES ARRESTED 

Reading, Pa., June 9. — Five employes 
of the Lee Bros. United Shows, exhibit- 
ing on the Reading Iron Company's play- 
ground, were arrested last Wednesday 
evening on the charge of fighting. Harry 
Lee, manager of the carnival, was struck 
in the eye by one of the fighters when be 
tried to quell the disturbance before the 
police arrived. 



DES MOINES PARK OPENS . 

Des Moines, la., June 9. — Riverview 
Park, under the management of A. Fran- 
kel, is open for the season with the Whip, 
dancing, roller coaster, bathing, tennis, 
bowling alley and band concerts as out- 
door attractions. The band will be changed 
every two weeks. 



BUCK BAILEY NOT DEAD 

Akbon, O., June 2. — The rumor that 
Buck Bailey, the old-time cowboy, had 
been killed in an automobile accident at 
Muncie, Ind., was apparently unfounded 
as he is alive and denies the report. 

JOLIET BANS CONCESSIONS 

Joliet. 111., June 9. — It is reported that 
County Attorney Martin has placed a ban 
on all concessions and none will be per- 
mitted to operate here. 



TENNESSEE FAIR DATE SET 

Knoxviixe, Tenn., June 10. — The East 
Tennessee Division Fair will be held in 
this city September 17-22. J. G. Sterehi 
is president and J. L. Burdette, Jr., sec- 
retary. 



LANSING PARK OPENS 

Lansing, Mich., June 11. — Waverly 
Park, under the management of Thomas 
Reid, has opened for the Summer season. 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




FOR ADVERTISING 

RATES 
Phone Randolph 5423 



NEW FILM BILL 

WILL DESTROY 

CHIC. CENSOR 

PROVIDES FOR CENTRAL BUREAU 



Springfield, 111., June 11. — If the 
Guernsey bill passes the house of Repre- 
sentatives, there is every indication that 
the Chicago Board of Censors, conducted 
through the Police department, will be 
legislated out of business. Representative 
Guernsey, who is sponsor for the measure, 
has every assurance that the Senate will 
pass it and the Governor will affix his 
signature as soon as it is presented to him. 

The bill provides for a central consorship 
bureau, to be operated at Springfield. It 
specifies that a State permit, once granted, 
shall take the place of any and all other 
permits, municipal or otherwise. 

Provisions are made for a chief. State 
censor, who is to receive a salary of not 
more than $3,500 a year. About six sub- 
censors are to assist him in the work, they 
being supplied by civil service. The fee to 
be charged for examination of films, figured 
at an average of 200 per week, it is stated, 
will be expected to pay the cost of main- 
taining the bureau. 

The motion picture manufacturers and 
distributors at whose instigation the meas- 
ure was introduced, believe that they will 
save a considerable amount of money an- 
nually when the board is in operation. 
They have had considerable trouble in 
Chicago through the arbitrary attitude of 
Major Funkhauser, the police censor. He 
has condemned more film in that city than 
the censors of a dozen states in the Union 
have "tabooed" the State. About thirty- 
five per cent, of the film which he has 
approved bad to be deleted In such a man- 
ner that the actual purport and intention 
of the picture was eliminated they charge. 

This weakened the value of the produc- 
tion and, as a consequence,- the distributors 
suffered financial loss in the booking of 
these pictures. Many of them, which 
should have had runs of from three to 
seven days in a house were cancelled after 
the first day as they were found to be un- 
interesting through the deletion .of im- 
portant scenes, that caused the "punch" in 
the picture to be lost. 



USE PICTURES WITH SONGS 

Entertainers' Cafe, on East Thirty- 
fifth Street, has adopted the use of the 
screen to help put over songs, and Man- 
ager Bob Doner has sent out invitations 
to "pluggers" to infest his place with 
new numbers. The entertainers now ap- 
pearing include "English" Dot Lloyd, 
Cecil Manners, Jack Smith and Brockman 
and Howard. This cafe is the first of the 
local cabarets to use motion pictures 
■with songs. 

LA SALLE OPERA HOUSE SOLD 

The La Salle Opera House property, at 
106-116 West Madison Street, has been 
purchased by S. W. Straus and company 
from Mrs. Anna Sinton Taft and husband, 
Charles P. Taft, of Cincinnati. The latter 
is a brother of the former President. The 
price is said to be $825,000. While no im- 
mediate changes in the building are an- 
nounced, it is planned to improve the en- 
tire holding with a high grade store and 
office building. 



LOGAN SQUARE CHANGES POLICY 
The Logan Square Theatre opened last 
week as a vaudeville and picture house 
under the management of Walter Meakin. 
A new policy was inaugurated which in- 
cludes a change of bill every Monday, 
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, with 
two shows nightly, except on Saturdays, 
Sundays and Holidays when two shows 
will also be given in the afternoons. 
Every Tuesday will be "song contest 
night," and Thursdays will be Known as 
Big Professional Nights, when eight aets 
will be put on. T. R. Thompson is back 
of the venture. 



KEDZIE DONATES RECEIPTS 

Manager August Bunge of the Kedzie 
Avenue Theatre, gave a special all-star 
performance at his bouse Monday for the 
benefit of the Hospital Corps of the First 
Illinois Infantry, donating the entire pro- 
ceeds of the evening. 



MAX STONE REMAINS 

Though it was generally understood that 
there was to be a change in management 
of Jos. W. Stern's Chicago office, the visit 
of Wolf Gilbert brought forth the an- 
nouncement that Max Stone will remain 
in charge. 



WADSWORTH BACK AT GARDEN 

F. Wheeler Wadsworth and his Jazz 
Band, recently lent by Sam Roth of the 
Winter Garden, to "The Love Mill" for the 
"Cotton Blossoms" specialty, are back at 
the Winter Garden. Wadsworth was to 
have gone to New York for thirty weeks 
at his Cocoanut Grove, but canceled the 
engagement owing to the one o'clock clos- 
ing law in Gotham. 



MINNESOTA LAW 

HITS AGENTS 

HARD 

THROWS OUT MANY PERFORMERS 



"DEW DROP INN" FOR THE ILLINOIS 

The Illinois Theatre, under the manage- 
ment of Harry Powers, will reopen Satur- 
day, after a fortnight's darkness, with a 
musical comedy of fifty people, entitled 
"Dew Drop Inn" that features Percival 
Knight. Myron B. Rice will offer the pro- 
duction and make a feature of dollar 
matinees. 

ARTHUR HIGSON COLLAPSES 

Arthur Higson, the English eccentric 
dancer, who opened an engagement at the 
Winter Garden, Monday of last week, 
fainted at the conclusion of his act that 
evening, falling head foremost down a 
flight of steps and suffering a severe scalp 
wound. _^_______ 

ENLARGE VAUDEVILLE ACT 

Levine and Innman have had their 
former vaudeville vehicle set to music and, 
under the title of "Sallie's Return" it 
opened on the road under the direction 
of Jnke Stcrnard. June 9. It was produced 
by Virgil Bennett. 

FLORENCE INGERSOLL ENGAGED 

Florence Ingersoll, who closed with the 
Julian Eltingc "Cousin Lucy" show at the 
Blackstone Theatre, here, recently, has 
been engaged as novelty dancer at the 
Winter Garden, this city, for an indefinite 
period. , 

TWO LILLIANS ENGAGED 

Lillian Brown, appearing at the Cafe 
De Luxe, and Lillian Rockley, at the Green 
Mill Gardens, have been engaged for a 
short season at the Deshley Hotel, Colum- 
bus, O. ■ 

GILBERT VISITS STERN OFFICE 

L. Wolfe Gilbert, professional manager 
for the New York office of Jos. Stem and 
company, was a recent visitor to the firm's 
local office returning to the East last 
week. 

REVUE TO OPEN FRIDAY 

Jackson Park Tavern will open its re- 
vue Friday. Those entertainers retained 
are the Loos Brothers, Maud Clark and 
Anita Gray. 



Chicago booking agents have been hard 
hit by the "war order" issued on June 5 
by the Public Safety Commission of Min- 
nesota, which -prohibits women from being 
served in any cafe, public wine room or 
other place coming under the head of 
"saloon." It also stops dancing and music 
in cabarets throughout the State and or- 
ders every place of this kind closed at 10 
p. m. 

One local agency, the newly formed 
American Amusement Managers' Associa- 
tion, was forced to cancel over one hun- 
dred contracts for performers placed for 
engagements in Minnesota. 

Immediately after the law went into ef- 
fect, entertainers engaged at the various 
resorts in Minneapolis and St. Paul left 
those cities, and six orchestras, five sing- 
ing combinations and many single turns 
are on their way East, thrown out of em- 
ployment by the new law. 

Hotel managers and several Chicago 
agents hold that the law is unconstitu- 
tional and through their attorneys will 
contest the Commission's order. 



DANCER AIDS FUND 

Doraldina, the dancer, appeared at the 
naval benefit fund performance here, June 
8, aiding materially in swelling the receipts. 



HARRY PETERSON IN TOWN 

Harry Peterson, stage manager of the 
Family Theatre, Moline, 111., was in Chi- 
cago last week for a few days. 

AVENUE CLOSED FOR SUMMER 

The Avenue Theatre has closed for the 



SUES TO SHOW "BIRTH" FILM 

Alfred Warman, of the Eugenic Film 
Company, filed a petition for a writ of 
mandamus, June 5, against the city of 
Chicago, Mayor Thompson, Chief of Police 
Schuettler and Second Deputy Funk- 
houser, alleging that be was refused a 
permit for the showing of a picture en- 
titled "Birth," which showed the proper 
method of caring for a newly born child. 



STAGE HANDS ENLIST 

The following, all members of Local 
No. 2, I. A. T. S. E., have been added to 
the U. S. Aerial Fleet, Chicago: Charles 
Pauley, Eddie Greene, Charles Moore and 
William Butters. All are electricians and 
enlisted as mechanics. Brother officers 
John Fanning and H. B. Savage are en- 
couraging other members to do likewise. 

ORR CO. TO OPEN IN SEPT. 

H. D. Orr's new musical comedy by 
Louis Weslyn, entitled "There She Goes," 
will open in Pennsylvania the early part 
of September, booked by Klaw & Er- 
langer. The company will carry thirty- 
five people and a Jazz orchestra. 

TWO BANDS ARE ENGAGED 

Ferullo's Band will open a summer en- 
gagement at Edelweiss Out Door Gardens, 
here, June 20. Banda Roma's Band has 
been engaged for the Green Mill Gardens' 
outdoor revue, opening 15. 



HENDERSON GOES TO PARK 

Dave Henderson, formerly director at 
the Academy and Criterion theatres, is 
now in charge of the "Jack Rabbit" con- 
cession at Riverview Park. 



NO CHANGE IN THEATRE PLANS 

The directors of the new theatre to be 
erected at the corner of Stat: and Lake 
streets, deny a story to the effect that the 
death of C. E. Kohl "may make some 
changes" in their plans. There has been 
no change in the original plans. The 
theatre will be erected and it is fully ex- 
pected that it will be completed on the 
date originally set. 



FRED YORK LEAVES MAJESTIC 

Fred York, assistant property master 
at the Majestic for the past two years, 
has moved to the P.ialto Theatre aa 
property master. 



FREIBERG'S CHANGES NAME 

Freiberg's Hall, a popular haunt of per- 
formers, will hereafter be known as "Old 
Vienna," Eddie Myers, lessee and man- 
ager, announces. 

O'NEILL A. GALLAGHER ROUTED 

O'Neill and Gallagher have been routed 
for twenty-five weeks over the Pantages 
time. 



J. L. & S. BUILDING HOUSE 

A new vaudeville and picture theatre, to 
seat 2,500, is in the course of construction 
by the firm of Jones, Linick and Schaefer. 
at Broadway and Lawrence Avenue. It 
will be known as the Broadway Hippo- 
drome. The cost of the new bouse is said 
to be $600,000. An effort will be made to 
have it ready for opening on or about 
Sept. 1. Thomas Cbamales is the builder. 



LITTLE JERRY OBUGES 

Little Jerry, the diminutive comedian, 
who recently stepped out of pictures with 
the Keystone Company to accept a Shu- 
bert offer of a three-year contract for the 
Winter Garden, New York, was a special 
attraction at the Logan Square Theatre. 
Wednesday and Thursday evenings of last 
week, being a close friend of House Man- 
ager Walt Meakins. 



KINGSBURY GIVES BENEFIT 

A benefit performance, under the direc- 
tion of George Kingsbury, manager of tbe 
"Turn to the Right" company, was 
staged at Cohan's Grand Opera House aa 
a matinee on June 12th, for the fam'lies 
of sailors who have been ordered to tbe 
fighting lines. The theatre was donated 
for the cause by Harry Ridings. 



DEATH WON'T AFFECT W. V. M. A. 

Notwithstanding several rumors that, 
owing to the recent death of Charles E. 
Kobl, Jr., changes in the executive staff 
of the Western Vaudeville Managers' As- 
sociation should be imperative, Mort Singer 
confirms the fact that the present officer* 
will continue as in tbe past. 



MACK GOES WITH BLUEBIRD 

Irving Mack, for several years assistant 
to Ralph Kettering, publicity director for 
the Jones, Linick and Schaefer enterprises, 
began his duties last week as publicity 
director of the Bluebird and Universal 
Film companies in this city. 

COLONIAL HAS "ON TRIAL" 

The film version of "On Trial" suc- 
ceeded the phenomenal run of "The Bar- 
rier" at the Colonial Theatre, Sunday 
night. The performances will be contin- 
uous, from eleven in the morning till 11 
p. m. 



FAYE O'NEILL SIGNED UP 

Faye O'Neill, formerly understudy to 
Ann Pennington in "Ziegfeld's Follies," has 
succeeded Betty Caldwell in the lead role 
with Menlo Moore's latest vaudeville offer- 
ing, "Little Miss Up To Date." Leon 
Leonard is playing opposite here. 



CASINO TO CHANGE POUCY 

Monday will see a change of policy at 
the Casino Theatre, when five acta and 
pictures will be shown. The house is 
still leased by Doc White and bookings 
continue through J. J. Nasb, of the Affili- 
ated offices. 



REPORT JIM HATHAWAY ROBBED 

Jim Hathaway, organizer of the "Pal's 
Club," this city, is reported to have been 
robbed of $850 in cash and jewelry valued 
at $1,000, both taken from his trunks at a 
local hotel last Thursday. 



GETS RIGHTS TO "DEEMSTER" 

J. B. Warren, of the Warren Amusement 
Co., has secured the State Rights to tbe 
showing of Hall Caine's "The Deemster" 
in film form in Ohio, Illinois and Indiana. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 








SHEET MUSIC MEN 

MEET IN CONVENTION 



National Association of Dealers and Pub- 
lishers Hold Annual Meeting. Mem- 
bers From AU Parts Attend. 

The National Association of Sheet Music 
Dealers is holding its fourth annual con- 
vention at the Hotel McAlpin this week, 
and the organization, which, during its 
short existence, has enrolled as a member 
nearly every large retailing firm in the 
United States, is discussing and acting 
upon many of the important issues of the 
industry. 

The convention met on Monday and ad- 
journed over Tuesday, when the National 
Association of Sheet Music Publishers met 
ar the Hotel Astor. and resumed on 
Wednesday, for two days more. 

A feature of the meeting will.be a din- 
ner given to the visiting delegates by the 
Greater New York Music Publishers' and 
Dealers* Association. 

The president of the Dealers' Associa- 
tion is Charles W. Homeyer of Boston and 
the secretary and treasurer is R. W. Hef- 
felfinger of Los Angeles. 

The convention will act upon resolutions 
regarding war taxes, postal rates and other 
matters of importance affecting the sheet 
music business. 

All members of the association were 
asked to instruct their clerks and employ- 
ees to subscribe to the government loan. 



THE MYSTERY EXPLAINED 

One of vaudeville's mysteries was the 
remarkable success scored at the Palace 
Theatre recently by W. J. Reilly of the 
United States battleship Michigan. This 
young man of supposedly no previous 
stage experience booked merely as an aid 
to the government in recruiting, in a 
piano and singing act scored such a hit 
that after bis first performance he was 
the talk of Broadway. 

Critics marveled at his ease and his 
entire lack of stage fright, and probably 
would be still discussing him if the story 
had not leaked out last week. Instead of 
being a raw amateur, Reilly had- over 
three years' experience in that greatest 
of all stage schools, a minstrel show. 

A number of years ago he was a boy 
soprano, and was placed with the Al. G. 
Field show by Julius Witmark. He re- 
mained with Fields until his voice 
changed and then retired from the stage 
to give the vocal chords time for rest. He 
has been putting in the time in the navy, 
and the voice, completely set, is now in- 
stead of a soprano a big baritone, which 
he uses with much abilitv. 



"HAMMER AND PLOW" FEATURED 

"The Man Behind the Hammer and the 
Plow," the new Harry Von Tilzer patri- 
otic song, was featured in over twenty 
theatres in New York and Brooklyn last 
week. This song, although less than two 
months old, is one of the biggest popular 
sellers of the year. 



A COHAN INTERPOLATION 

George M. Cohan has a song interpola- 
tion in the new Revue "Hitcny-Koo." It 
is a particularly clever number and is 
called "Since I Became a Manager." 



NEW FORSTER PROF. MANAGER 

Dave Wohlman left this week for Chi- 
cago to take charge of the professional 
department of Forster, Music Publisher, 
Inc. 



RUSSACK BACK WITH BROADWAY 

"Bob" Russack, for the past few weeks 
with the Millegram Music Co. is back with 
the Broadway Music Corporation. 



NAN HALPER1N SINGS NEW SONGS 
Nan Halperin, America's favorite come- 
edienne — the "personality girl" — is now 
playing at the New Brighton Theatre, pre- 
senting her new song creations, the work 
of William B. Friedlander. Her offering 
includes. "Play My Wedding March in 
Ragtime, "I'd Rather Be a Bridesmaid 
Than a Bride" and "The Youngest of the 
Family." 

All of Miss Halperin's numbers are now 
being published by .Tos. W. Stern & Co., 
which is regarded as somewhat of a tri- 
umph for that house, because of the fact 
that Mr. Friedlander has hitherto declined 
to have these songs published. 



DONOVAN RECEIVES 

UNEXPECTED GIFT 



SONG POPULARIZATION 
ON WESTERN COAST 



In Conjunction with Coast Artillery 
Corps, Feist Office Conducts Great 
Campaign in San Francisco 

The San Francisco office of the Leo Feist 
house has just completed a remarkable feat 
in connection with the popularization of 
the new songs "If I Had a Son for Every 
Star in Old Glory," and Percy Wenrich 
and Howard Johnson's "Where Do We 
Go From Here?" 

In conjunction with the Coast Artillery 
Corps, the Feist forces for nearly a week 
conducted in San Francisco, what Man- 
ager Johnson of the Feist 'Frisco office 
declared was the biggest street song plug- 
ging stunt ever accomplished in the Coast 
<-ity. 

With a big Garford automobile truck 
with a. special platform which held a piano 
and four singers dressed in the uniform 
of the .Coast Artillery Corps, the songs 
were sung in the city streets for a fnll 
week. Big banners bearing the names of 
the numbers were carried as well as the 
regular recruiting signs of the Artillery 
Co., and a part of the time two young 
ladies dressed in nurse's costumes aided 
in the singing. 

A regular artilleryman drove the truck 
and four soldiers distributed governmental 
recruiting literature. 

. The song "Where Do We Go From 
Here?" has been taken up by the West- 
ern soldiers, who are singing it upon all 
occasions and the officers of the regiments 
stationed near San Francisco are having 
the number taught to the men. 

So well has the song caught on in the 
Western city, that the San Francisco Call 
and Pott in the issue of May 20th, pub- 
lished a full page editorial in connection 
with it. 



PUT "SADIE LOVE" TO MUSIC 

Oliver Morosco has completed arrange- 
ments whereby he will use "Sadie Love," 
Avery Hopwood'B farce, as the Imsis for a 
new musical comedy. In its new version, 
the play will have trial performances in 
I.os Angeles this summer under the name 
of "A Full Honevmoon." 



FLOOD OF PATRIOTIC SONGS 

According to R. W. Heffelfinger. secre- 
tary and treasurer of the National Asso- 
ciation of Sheet Music Dealers, more than 
300 patriotic songs have been published in 
the city of Los Angeles since April 1. 



ANOTHER FRIML OPERETTA 

"Furs and Frills" is the title of a new 
musical piece which Arthur Hammerstein 
will present next season. Edward Clarke 
is its author, while Rudolf Friml com- 
posed the music. 



A NEW CARROLL PLAY 

Earl Carroll is writing the music for a 
new play to be called "Call a Taxi," which 
will be produced early next season by 
A. H. Woods. 



Comedian who Suggested Song Title 

Richly Rewarded by 

Ernest R. Ball 

Jim Donovan and Ernest R. Ball were 
at a party last. year. At the same party 
was Mrs. Donovan and Mrs. Ball. Dono- 
van is known in vaudeville for his char- 
acterizations of the Irish type of comedian 
and everybody knows the Irish songs that 
"Erny" Ball has written. Anyhow, while 
at this party. Donovan hummed over a 
melody and then read a lyric to Erny Ball. 
Rail stated that there really was nothing 
to the song, but that he admired the title. 

In his big hearted way Donovan told 
Ball it was his for the asking and to for- 
get it. Incidentally Ball wrote a song 
which had nearly a million copies for sale 
and the firm of M. Witmark & Sons put 
the song out in a way that will make it 
one of those everlasting hits. Last week 
Lambert and Ball and Donovan and Lee 
appeared at B. F. Keith's Theatre, Phila- 
delphia, where they both scored individual 
success with their respective acts. One of 
the rules at this theatre is that a member 
of the act must go out to the man- 
ager's office on Saturday night and sign for 
the pay envelope. 

When Jim Donovan went out a crowd 
was gathered in the managers office and, 
as he explains it he did not know if he was 
going to be pinched by a sheriff or was 
going to be asked to play a benefit. He 
opened the envelope before Ire signed for 
the salary for the act and therein fonnd 
a check for $500, signed Ernest R. Ball. 
Jim later stated that his eyes filled up 
with tears as be looked at the check, but, 
that as long as he lives, that check will 
never find it's way to the bank. 

It will ever remain a possession of his 
to show his friends of the munificence of 
Ernest R. Ball. 

The song title in question for which Ball 
paid the $500 was "Good-Bye, Good-Luck, 
God Bless You." 



SING FOUR WITMARK SONGS 

George Lyons, one of vaudeville's clever 
entertainers possesses an almost uncanny 
ability in selecting a repertoire which never 
fails to please his audience. At present he 
is using no less than four numbers from 
the Witmark catalog, all of the top notch 
variety. 

First, there is Victor Herbert's sweet- 
est of all melodies. "Kiss Me Again," 
which Lyons uses with immense effect as 
a harp solo. He follows this with the 
singing of Ernest R. Ball's two latest hits, 
"AU the World Will Be Jealous of Me" 
and "Somewhere in Ireland," both of 
which are the big things in popular num- 
bers just now. Lastly, he introduces a 
song of his own, just published by Wit- 
mark, called "Don't Worry, Dearie." To 
which one would fain reply, "Don't Worry, 
Georgie," for as long as he presents such 
material and in such a finished character- 
istic manner, there's not a reason in the 
world why he should. 



REVIVES OLD SONG 

"Break the News to Mother." is now be- 
ing sung by many professional singers in 
vaudeville, according to Charles K. Har- 
ris, the writer and publisher of this famous 
war ballad. Louis Cobn, professional 
manager for Harris, predicts tbat the song 
is going to repeat the wonderful sales rec- 
ord it established during the Spanish 
American War. Frank Morrell, Immo- 
gene, and Carrie Dreams are all enjoying 
success with this number. 



SOME TITLE THIS! 

London has a new song hit, and in all 
the cafes and halls a novelty number by 
Worton David and Lilian Shirley is beard. 
It is called "There's A Ship That* s Bonnd 
for Blighty." 



THAT "JEALOUS" HIT! 

After pausing for some time on the 
brink of the pool of popularity, "All the 
World Will Be Jealous of Me" has sud- 
denly taken the plunge and is now the 
biggest ballad hit on the market. This 
is the well-written story-stong by Al. 
Duhin, set to a characteristic and more 
than ordinarily tuneful waltz movement 
by Ernest R. Ball. A genuine liking for 
it on the part of both singers and public 
has resulted in its thus appearing at the 
head of the list of "best sellers" in the 
popular song field, and its publishers, M. 
Witmark & Sons, are to be congratulated 
on a substantial success that will help to 
a very considerable extent to make the 
summer an exceedingly enjoyable one for 
all concerned. "AH the World Will Be 
Jealous of Me" is being sung by scores of 
acts everywhere, and in New York last 
week no fewer than sixteen houses daily 
and nightly listened to its strains. 



NORA BAYES SINGS NOVELTY 

Among the new discoveries revealed by 
tbat assiduous searcher after worth-while 
novelties, Nora Bayes, is a song called 
"There Wasn't Anybody There to Meet 
Me," by Newton Alexander. It's a capital 
little ditty and tells a homely truth in 
a captivating and melodious vein. .Miss 
Bayes is one of the best pickers of a 
good song we know, and her judgment in 
regard to "There Wasn't Anybody There 
to Meet Me" is not likely t"<> be false. 

Another novelty by Newton Alexander 
is the song "You've Got 'Em, That's All." 
This is one of those numbers whose title 
keeps you guessing, and you'd probably 
guess wrong at that. It surely, deserves 
the appellation of "novelty." Both these 
songs are published by M. Witmark & 
Sons, and both are also featured by the 
vaudeville team of which the author is a 
conspicuous member — the Lightner Sis- 
ter and Newton Alexander. 



FRIEDLAND'S NEW BALLAD 

Jos. W. Stern & Co. are meeting suc- 
cess with a new ballad, "My Sweet 
Egyptian Rose," by Edgar Allen Woolf 
and Anatol Friedland, who wrote the fa- 
mous "My Little Persian Rose" several 
years ago. The new "Egyptian Rose" is 
proving immensely popular. 

Another Stern number showing up re- 
markably well and much in demand by 
professionals is "My Princess of the Wil- 
low Tree," by Will narris and Carey 
Morgan. The lyric story is an appealing 
one, and the melody far excels Morgan's 
famous "My Own Iona" and "Hawaiian 
Sunshine." 



COHAN SINGS "OVER THERE" 

At the big Friars' show given on Satur- 
day night for the troops at Fort Meyers, 
George M. Cohan sang his new patriotic 
song "Over There" and scored one of the 
big hits of the evening. 

In addition to a great attendance of 
soldiers many prominent government of- 
ficials went over from Washington, among 
them being President Wilson. The Will- 
iam Jerobe Pub. Corp. publishes the song. 



A TIMELY VON TILZER NOVELTY 

"Buy A Liberty Bond for the Baby," a 
timely Harry Von Tilzer novelty song, al- 
though just off the presses is meeting with 
pronounced success. The new number is 
already being featured by scores of well 
known singers, all of whom are meeting 
with pronounced success with it. 

With a striking and original title page 
the song will be issued within the next 
few days. 



GILBERT BACK FROM CHICAGO 

Wolfe Gilbert, professional manager for 
Jos. W. Stern & Co., returned this week 
from a short visit to Chicago. While there 
he installed "Jack" Stern as manager of 
the Chicago office. Max Stone, former 
manager, will -be transferred to the. East. 



June 13, 1917 . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




TRAVELING CO.'S 

MUST CARRY 

AGENT 

BILLPOSTERS TO COMPEL ACTION 



At the last convention of the Interna- 
tional Alliance of Bill Posters and Billera 
of America, held in Minneapolis, a resolu- 
tion was passed which will compel all 
traveling burlesque companies to carry 
an agent in advance of the attraction or 
be compelled to pay the salaries of two 
local billers in the city the show plays. 
This order is to go into effect next season. 

When this news was conveyed to bur- 
lesque producers many of them seemed to 
be somewhat perturbed. They claimed 
they were operating their shows, and that 
they knew whether or not they desired to 
carry agents. A prominent official of the 
Burlesque Circuit stated that most of the 
shows were carrying agents in advance 
during the past seuson, and that some 
were carrying two men. But a great 
many of the producers seem to feel that 
agents' ahead of burlesque shows are lax 
in their duties and do not accomplish any 
work, simply being "tourists" with the 
show. 

This person declared that if the proper 
type of agents presented themselves to 
the people who have been operating shows 
without such aid in the past, and could 
convince them that their services would 
be of value, he had no doubt but that the 
men would be hired. 

A great number of the shows on the 
Columbia Circuit will have a flrst and 
second man ahead. The flrst man will ex- 
clusively handle the newspaper work 
while the other man will tend to the 
billing. 

COMPLETE "BOSTONIAN" ROSTER 

The roster of "Waldon's BostonianB" 
next season will be : Frank Finney, Phil 
Ott, Nettie wisnri, Beatrice, the ragtime 
violinist; James Hunter, Kathryn Dickey, 
Bobby Van Horn, Geo. Mack and Rose 
Bernard. 

Frank Pierce will again be the manager, 
and William Waldron agent. 



SYDELL ROSTER IS COMPLETE 

The roster of the "Rose Sydell London 
Belles" company will be : George F. Hayes, 
Ted Burns, Kate Pullman, Sam Lewis, 
Louise Hartman, Frankie Burns, Dorothy 
Earle, and twenty-two chorus girls. Dave 
Guran, manager; Fred Rounds, leader. 



MRS. TOM SULLIVAN ILL 
Word has just leaked out of the illness 
of Mrs. Tom Sullivan, who was operated 
on for appendicitis on May 29 at the 
Misericordia Hospital, New York. The 
operation was successful. Mrs. Sullivan 
will leave the hospital this week. 



OLYMPIC GETS EDDIE FOX 

Eddie Fox, who will be featured with 
Harry Hastings* "Some Babies" company 
next season, has been engaged by Roehm 
and Richards for the stock at the Olympic 
for two weeks commencing June 25. He 
Will be featured. 



DAVENPORT TAKES AUTO TRIP 

Danny Davenport, treasurer of Hurtig 
& Seamon's Harlem theatre, left last Sat- 
urday for an automobile trip to Chicago, 
accompanied by his mother. He will be 
gone for six weeks. 



MARATSKEY AIDS NEW CLUB 

Louis Maratskey, the theatrical jeweler, 
has presented an eight-day clock to the 
Burlesque dub. It is now adorning the 
walls of the club rooms. 



HOWARD GIVES TWO-ACT 

Philadelphia, June 9. — One of the 
largest and best burlesque stock compa- 
nies now playing in the East is being 
managed here by Joe Howard at the 
Gayety. A cast of fourteen principals, 
headed by George Slocum, Lew Click and 
Dave Hoffman, is being presented this 
week in a two-act comedy. Others are 
Harry O'Neil, Al Dean/ Hallie Dean, 
Marion Milliard, Hattle Bealc, Emma 
Kohler, Isidore Stein, Billy Kelley and 
Martin Guild. 

A chorus of thirty-six pretty girls, the 
largest chorus ever presented in bur- 
lesque, form a pretty background for the 
principals. They include: 

Mae Alberta, Lillian Brooks, Ruth 
Bankroft, Anna Canover, Gertie Craw- 
ford, Belle Desmond, Elsie Davis, Lillian 
Davis, Ethel Earl, Anna Edwards, 
Gladys Emmerson, Sadie Eastwood, Belle 
Fanchon, Edna Fanchon, Dorothy Fran- 
cis, Mina Graham, Mildred Gilmore, Lot-_ 
tie Glick, Dorothy Hutchinson, Marie' 
Kurth, Cecil McCann, Mary Mclvenna, 
Margy Miller, Irene Myers, Billy Murray, 
Lillian Penner, Frankie Porter, Billy 
Perry, Irene Piichinsky, Bessie Russell, 
Sophie Sands, Betty Smith, Francis Sid- 
dons, Florence Strand, Opal Woods, 
Jeanne Waldman. 



EVA MALVIN MARRIED 
Eva Malvin, one of the principals of the 
Mollie Williams Show, will retire from 
show business at the close of her season 
at the Casino Theatre, Brooklyn, Saturday 
night, she having on May 10 become Mrs. 
Harry Smith in Chicago. Her husband is 
a well known business man of that city. 



FLORIDA JOINS SHOW 

George "Alabama" Florida joined the 
"World of Pleasure" Shows last week at 
Lawrence, Mass. Florida will remain an 
agent for this show throughout New Eng- 
land, until he starts his burlesque season 
early in August. 

HASTINGS BECOMES MASON 

Harry Hastings, owner of "Hastings 
Big Show," on the Columbia Circuit, and 
"Some Babies," on the American Circuit, 
recently joined the Masonic Order and 

Sussed through to the thirty-second 
egree. 

NELLIE SYLVESTER TO MOVE 

Nellie Sylvester, who for several years 
past has conducted the Sylvester House 
for theatrical people in Brooklyn, will 
move around the corner on Quincy Street 
some time before July 1. 

CAMPBELL SIGNS TEAM 

Ted and Frankie Burns have Bigned 
with Wm. Campbell for his "Rose Sydell's 
London Belles" Company next season. 
Ted Burns will be featured with George 
Hayes in the show. 

BAKER ENGAGES DONOHUE 

Charlie Donohue, who managed Jack 
Reid's Show last season, has been engaged 
by Charlie Baker to act in the same 
capacity for his "Speedway Girls" for next 
season." 



GERHARD Y SIGNS FREED 

Joe Freed has signed a contract with 
Manager Gerhardy, of the "Mischief 
Makers" for next season. This will be his 
third season with the show. 



MOLLIE WILLIAMS AN AUTHOR 

Mollie Williams has written a new 
dramatic sketch which she will call "Trap," 
to be produced by herself in her own show 
next season. 



ABBOTT REMAINS AT PEOPLE'S 

Announcement has been made that 
Frank Abbott will again manage the 
People's Theatre, Philadelphia, next sea- 
son. 



TWO OLD TIME 

HOUSES TO BE 

RAZED 

OFFICE BLDGS. TO REPLACE THEM 



Two of the oldest burlesque houses in 
the United States hnve gone into the dis- 
card will shortly he in the hands of 
wreckers to make way for the erection of 
modern office buildings. They nre the Ly- 
ceum Theatre, Philadelphia, located at 
Eighth and Vine streets, and the Holliday 
Street Theatre. Baltimore, located oppo- 
site the City Hall. 

The Lyceum was sold last week at pub- 
lic aution and brought $19,500. The house, 
which has been untenanted for a number 
of years, was the first burlesque theatre in 
Philadelphia. It was first known as Mil- 
ler's Winter Garden. Later, it was re- 
named the Majestic Theatre and was op- 
erated by the late H. R. Jacobs for n num- 
ber of years. After Jacobs relinquished 
the house. John G. Jcrtnon, of Jacobs & 
Jermon, took the theatre over, renamed it 
the Lyceum, and operated It as a burlesque 
theatre until it was closed in 1907. 

The Hollidny Street Theatre was the 
first bouse erected in Baltimore. It has 
had a varied career, having played the big 
road attractions, grand opera, melodrama, 
vaudeville, colored shows and burlesque at 
various times. Several years ago it was 
purchased by the city in condemnation pro- 
ceedings and, until it would be available 
for city use, was rented out for a weekly 
rental of ?100 a week for burlesque and 
wrestling bouts. 

For the past two seasons the house has 
been operating as n stock burlesque theatre 
and shows were run there until last Sat- 
urday, when it closed. On Monday, the 
furniture and fixtures were removed from 
the building and yesterday the wreckers 
started work to demolish the building. Si- 
mon Dreisen was the last manager to op- 
erate the theatre, which was conducted by 
two Baltimore saloon keepers. Dreisen ex- 
pects to manage another burlesque house 
in Baltimore next season. 



NEW SHOW READY 

"Girls of America" is the title of a 
Summer musical show which Miller and 
Stewart have launched. It will have its 
opening at Roundout, N. Y.. June 14, 
and will play throngh the Catskills. 



FLORENCE KELLY SIGNED 

Florence Kelly has been re-signed by 
Mollie Williams for her show next season. 
She is one of the few members of this sea- 
son's company who will be with the show 
next year. 



CLARK TO MANAGE GAYETY 
Wm. S. Clark will again manage the 
Gayety, Baltimore, next season. lie has 
three sons of military age. and has sub- 
scribed for $1,100 Liberty Bonds. 

SCRIBNER TAKES VACATION 

Sam Scribner is enjoying a recreation 
automobile trip, including his annual 
home visit, through the Pennsylvania 
hills. 



LEWIS AND DODY ENGAGED 

Sam Lewis and Sam Dody will go with 
Hurtig & Semon's "Hello, America," com- 
pany next season. 



ARTHUR CONNELLY IS ILL 

Arthur Connelly, comedian of the Bar- 
ton Show, is ill in St. Catharine's Hos- 
pital, Brooklyn. 



THE CAMPBELLS ENTERTAIN 

Rose Sydell and Wm. S. Campbell en- 
tertained a select party of friends at a 
beefsteak dinner, served in Charles 
Springer's best style, last Sunday eve- 
ning at their home, 182 State Street, 
Brooklyn. 

The garden, which was used as the 
dining room, was covered over with three 
large American flags, festooned with elec- 
tric lights, and formed a prcttv setting. 
The lemon and orange grove, the rubber 
shoe tree and the clam plants were proud- 
ly exhibited by Bill, and souvenir glnssea 
were distributed among the guests. 

Dancing and other entertainments fol- 
lowed. Kate Pullman was irrepressible 
and did many of her acrobatic and danc- 
ing stunts. 

Phil and ( hrissio Sheridan did some of 
their old-time dances with unabated 
vigor. The toasts were numerous, many 
of them impromptu and original. 

Among those who enjoyed the festiv- 
ities were Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Jacobs, 
Mr. and Mrs. George Myers, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Hyams (Vinnie nenshaw), Harry 
Thompson, Robert Eldridge, Alice Os- 
borne, Charles Feldheim, Mr. and Mra. 
Fred Miller and Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Clark. 



BERNARD GOES TO LOUISVILLE 

Hughic Bernard, pnrtner of Barney 
Gerard in the ownership of the "Ameri- 
cans," on the American Burlesque Circuit, 
left last Sunday for I-ouisville. where he 
is visiting his wife and relatives. Bernard 
will return In time for rehearsals the 
middle of next mouth. _^| 

• , «£<.''*tij 

MAXIM'S ENGAGES KATE PULLMAN 

Kate Pullman, soubrette of the "Rose 
Sydell London Belles" company, has been 
engaged to appear at Maxim's, New York. 
MiBs Pullman appeared „t the benefit given 
at City Hall. Hoboken, June 5. to assist in 
the entertainment given to the young men 
who registered that day. 



COLUMBIA CUTS OUT LAYOFF 

The open week between Omaha, and 
Kansas City, on the Columbia Wheel, will 
be avoided next season. The shows will 
open in Omaha on Saturday afternoons 
and close Friday night, giving them ample 
time to reach the Gaiety, Kansas City, on 
Monday. 



PECK HEADS AMERICAN 

Through an error The Clipper last 
week stated in a head that George W. 
Peck had been elected head of the Colum- 
bia Amusement Company. It should have 
read the* American Burlesque Circuit in- 
stead. 



WELLS ENGAGES NOLAN 

Tommy Nolan, who did the eccentric kid 
work in the "Roseland Girls" last season, 
has been engaged by Billie Wells to go 
ahead of his "Mile-A-Minute Girls" next 
season. 



DICK PATTON IN NEW YORK 

Dick Patton, manager of the Gayety, 
Buffalo, arrived in town last week and 
announced that his house wonld be entirely 
redecorated before the season opened early 
In August. 



MACK SKINS WITH WALDRON 

Chicago. June 11.— George Mack, for- 
merly of Mack and Phillips, and bis wife. 
Rose Bernard, have signed with Charlen 
Waldron's "Bostonian Burlesquers" for 
next season. 



FISHER GOES WITH SHUBERTS 

Sam Fisher, formerly a burlesque ad- 
vance agent, is handling outdoor adver- 
tising for the Shnbcrt theatres in New York 
OJty. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 




PHILADELPHIA 



BOSTON 



3AN FRANCISCO CHICAGO . M . Wit mark & SonS PHILADELPHIA BOSTON 

Pantages Building Schiller Building Uptown Prof. ROOtTIS, AL. COOK, Mgr. 10Z1 CKcslnul St. 218 Tremont St. , 

AL. BROWNE, Mgr. TOM QUIGLEY, Mgr. 15G2 Broadway, Next to Palace Theatre ED. EDWARDS, Mgr. JACK LAHEY, Mgr. 



10Z1 Chestnut St. 



218 Tremont St. 



Americans Representative 
Dancers 

ADELAIDE 

and 

HUGHES 



SOPHIE 
TUCKER 

and her 5 Kings of 

Syncopation 
M'zt Max Hart 



LA 
BERGERE 

Art in Porcelain 

and Marble 

Direction 
FRA.XK DOXXELLY 
XORMAX JBFFERIES 



SYLVESTER 

AND 

VANCE 

in a skit by Willard Mack 
DIR. PETE MAC* 



NAN 
HALPERiN 



Management 
E. F. Albee 



ROBERT 

BORE 

The Eminent Barytone 
Direction Paul Durand 



GEORGE M. 
ROSENER 

The Representatiz'e 

Character Actor 

of American 

Vaudeiille 



CHAS. IdcCARRON 

Present* 

BETTY 
BOND 

In Five Flights of Musical 

Comedy. Captured By 

Arthur Klein* 



CHARLIE 
HOWARD 



Managrment 
Max Hart 



EDYTHE 
9 EDDIE 
ADAIR 

in 

"At the Shoe Shop" 

Manaiewumt 

STOKER <S- BIERBAUER. 



ELIZABETH 

M. 

MURRAY 



Dir. J/J. T. Wilton 



WILLIAM 



HALLEN 



and 
ETHEL 



HUNTER 

'Direction — Pete Mack 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



GLENN AND BURNS 

Theatre — Proctor'* 58*» Street. 

Style — Black-face skit. 

Time — Thirteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

These two men have a very novel black 
face tarn, in which they portray the role 
of two .street cleaners attired in regula- 
tion uniforms and carrying brooms. 

The opening number, a song entitled 
"The Sweeping Man," explains the 
nature of the act, which is carried 
through to the finish in dialogue. The 
talk is unusually interesting and humor- 
ous throughout, the lines being witty and 
amusing. The concluding dance is neatly 
executed and adds greatly to the value 
of the turn. 

It might be suggested that the couple 
obtain a special drop, which will greatly 
add to the merit of the act. 

The turn is well assembled, and should 
prove to be a good attraction as a feature 
turn in neighborhood theatres. A. D. 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

(Continued from page 9) 



WHIPPLE AND HUSTON 

Theatre — Proctor's 58th Street. » 

Style — Comedy Novelty Sketch. 

Time — Twenty-one minutes. 

Setting — Full stage special. 

This act is billed as a mystery, com- 
edy sensation, under the title of 
"Spooks." To the mind of the writer, 
such billing is somewhat misleading, as 
the entire business is centered upon the 
use of shoes and the talk is about "Life's 
Shop Window," which should be the 
tide. 

The turn is a distinct novelty, with 
many humorous lines and situations, that 
amuse the audience. The idea of the 
act is very unique. Both Mrs. Whipple 
and Houston are finished performers, 
and the young man assistant is also quite 
capable. 

The character songs are impressive 
and are rendered in a very satisfactory 
manner. In its entirety, the act is very 
wholesome and, when running smoothly, 
will probably find its way into the two- 
a-day bouses. In its present shape, the 
turn can be easily placed in a feature 
spot on three-a-day bills. A. TJ. 



MAE CURTIS 

Theatre — McVicker's, Chicago. 

Style— Character singer. 

Time — Sixteen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

As a character singer, Mae Curtis 
possesses originality, offering a re- 
stricted repertoire that few can render 
hj well as she. Her variety of nnt 
material would be a welcome addition 
to any mad-house. 

The spot aUoted her on the bill gave 
her leeway to tickle the fossils' funny- 
bones, and she took advantage of the op- 
portunity, scoring readily, especially in 
the spinster number, "My Kingdom for a 
Man." Her representation of the cigar- 
stand girl, in which she imitates nickle- 
nursers and lobbyoglers, went over 
splendidly. 

We would suggest that in her sketch of 
the rube she wear a hay-time hat in- 
stead of the spectacles. 

McVicker's liked her. F. C. 



ABBOTT AND MILLS 

Theatre— Proctor's 58<fc Street. 

Style — Comedy skit. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Setting — Special one and two. 

The opening in one of this act, with 
the man and woman appearing against a 
drop and indulging in a pantomimic bit, 
seems rather weak. The woman later 
appears in one, yodling an old-time 
selection and finishing up with a wooden 
shoe dance. The latter could be elimi- 
nated, as the song is rendered in good 
style, and should not be handicapped by 
the dancing endeavor. 

After this number the curtain rises on 
a house in two, with a window being 
used for conversation between the couple. 
The talk routine here is novel and amus- 
ing, but drags along altogether too much. 
There is sufficient substance in the 
tarn to make it a pleasing one for the 
second or third spot on the three-a-day 
house bill after it is properly aaaembled. 

A. TJ. 



"THE MILLIONAIRE" 

Theatre— Palace, 8. I. 

Act — Musical act. 

Time — Twenty-two minutes. 

Setting— Special boxed set. 

"The Millionaire" is an act billed as 
"A Bridal Bouquet with Music," written 
by Joe Burrowes and presenting seven 
American Beauties and two dandy lions. 
Lotta Baker, Fred Raymond and Jack 
Russell have the leads. 

Everything in the act is special, and 
leading furnishers are given credit for 
their origin. The act contains all the 
elements necessary for a good musical 
act, namely, good actors, good music ex- 
cellent singing, well staged, and, lastly, 
a plot of sufficient interest to keep the 
people awake. The chorus makes several 
changes in costume, the folly one, in 
which the girls represent dice, cards, 
wine, women, song and gaiety, being 
especially attractive. 

This act should prove a winner in any 
house. H. S. P. 



THE ADAMARS 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — Singing skit. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

The act is done in one, with a drop, 
on the right of which is a dry gooda 
store. On the left is a bar. Each has 
an entrance. 

The first song is about shopping, in 
which the man and the girl deliver some 
good cross-fire lyrics. More songs fol- 
low, interspersed with talk. When the 
girl sings solos, the man injects comedy 
into the act by frequent visits to the 
bar and, upon each visit, there can be 
heard the ringing of the cash register. 

The talk is original and funny, the 
comedy is good, and the songs are well 
put over. H. G. 

MAUDIE SCOTT AND CO. 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting— Parlor. 

"In Tennessee," is a crudely written 
and fairly well acted playlet. 

It deals with the murder of the brother 
of the district attorney, who decides to 
prosecute the murderer vigorously. But, 
after learning that his brother was killed 
for not treating a certain Tennessee girl 
squarely, he reconsiders his decision and 
tells the newspapers that they are cor- 
rect in their suicide theory. 

The plot is of the old-fashioned, melo- 
dramatic type, and put on in a passe 
way. For instance, when the half-wit- 
ted boy, who is suspected of the murder, 
creeps into the room, the orchestra plays 
some "villain" music pianissimo. And 
when the Tennessee girl tells the story 
of her life, consuming almost fonr min- 
utes- without an interruption, the or- 
chestra, muted, plays "The Rosary." 
The playlet should either undergo a 
thorough reconstruction or new material 
should be found for Maudie Scott and 
company. • H. G. 



HUNTER AND BAUER 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — Man-and-girl. 

Time — Twenty minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Frankie Hunter and Anna Bauer 
have an acceptable turn, in which 
Hunter first does an Italian take-off 

. and later does black face, succeeding with 
both. 

Taken all in all, the work of the pair 
is very clever. Hunter knows bow to 
get laughs with his comedy, and Miss 
Bauer puts her songs over nicely. 

The beef stew and chicken talk Is not 
particularly funny. Also, when the audi- 
ence starts to applaud, Hunter's telling 
them, "Not Yet!" is very reminiscent 
of McKay, of McKay and Ardine. 

With these bits eliminated, the act 
should be a wiuner. H. G. 



CAMERON AND CRANE 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Comedy sketch. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — Boxed set. 

Two men and a woman arc seen in 
this skit, which tells the story of how a 
husband got rid of a gay lotbario, who is 
trying to win the favor of his wife, a 
woman who is not disinclined to a little 
flirtation. 

The husband meets the young man as 
he comes in and, as soon as he learns 
who he is, decides to cure him. By a 
line of talk in which he tells the young 
man he is only one of two dozen who pay 
court to his wife, the husband accom- 
plishes his object and, when the wife 
appears, the youth departs. 

It is a well written skit, with a good 
central idea, well carried out. The lines 
are humorous and call for plenty of 
laughs. The three players do capital 
work. E. W. 



SHAW AND SEABURY 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Ten minutes. 

Setting — Open in one and full stage. 

Opening in "one," with about three 
lines of talk, Shaw and Seabury go into 
a song supposed to tell the audience bow 
to dance the Bombashy. The opening, 
however, when the act was seen, was 
marred by the orchestra not getting the 
cue right or, perhaps, the very apparent 
nervousness of the performers. The girl 
in the act next introduced a barefoot 
dance. 

The young man with several superflu- 
ous gestures next put over a corking 
good eccentric dance, which proved that 
he had studied and worked bard to ac- 
complish the difficult routine he had 
chosen. Several "bell" kicks and Rus- 
sian dance steps were roundly applauded. 
As a finish they offer a double eccentric 
number, in which the young man does 
most of the work and the girl neglects 
to point her toes. Several acrobatic 
stunts are attempted, and some Russian 
steps by the man let the act get away 
with a strong hand. S. L. H. 



ROLLINS & NORRIS 

Theatre — Royal. 
Style— Skit. 
Time — Siateen minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

It is difficult to suggest any practical 

means of reconstructing this offering, 
which is entitled "A Manhattan Night," 
because, as matters stand, both good ma- 
terial and good talent seem to be lack- 
ing. 

The scene (a drop in one) represents 
night-time in Manhattan. 

Jack Rollins, apparently drunk, enters 
with a toy automobile, which he is 
polling along, and meets Nena Morris, 
who is waiting for an owl car to take 
her home. There is a lot of weak talk 
which, with the exception of the night 
boat to Albany gag, seems to be original, 
but is not sure fire. Several songs are 
poorly rendered. H. G. 



DOROTHY ROGERS AND CO. 

Theatre — City. 

Style — Comedy sketch. 

Time — Eleven minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

In her present vehicle, Dorothy 
Rogers is a fortune teller, who tried to 
unite a naggy wife and drunkard hus- 
band. A fourth member of the act im- 
personates the devil. 

The act moves with rapidity and con- 
tains many funny lines. Hubby is glad 
to be rid of his wife and. when the 
crystal gazer orders him to "go to your 
wife or go to the devil" he goes with 
the latter. 

The setting of the act is especially 
worthy of mention, the weird atmos- 
phere being carried out. ■ 8. W, 



CONROY AND LE MAIRE 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Comedy skit. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — In one and full stage garden set. 
"For Sale— A Ford" is the title of the 
new offering of Conroy and Le Make. 
who are assisted by two others in put- 
ting over the latest of their skits. 

The act starts in a street set in which 
Le Maire tells Conroy that he has col- 
lected some money from an insurance 
company, and that they would now find 
a job running an automobile. 

In the first part of the act the talk 
lacks continuity and, therefore, the 
laughs did not come as fast as expected. 
A police officer finally chases an auto in 
which they are supposed to be riding. 
The speeches of the policeman, who looks 
the part, are quite amateurish. 

The next scene is in a garden setting, 
showing a d el a p id a ted Ford car marked, 
for no reason, "Packard." Conroy and 
Le Maire are bidding good-bye to their 
supposed boss. A lot of cross-fire chat- 
ter of the familiar sort and the backing 
and jumping of the machine lead up to 
the finish, in which Le Maire acts as 
driver, while Conroy pulls the car off 
stage. As a successor to the other Con- 
roy and Le Maire laugh festivals, this 
latest skit hasn't a look-in. S. L. H. 



HALLEN AND HUNTER 

Theatre — Riverside. 
Style — Comedy skit. 
Time — Fifteen minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

This is an act put together entirely for 
laugbing purposes and it succeeds ad- 
mirably. Miss Hunter is a good violinist 
and Mr. Hallen is a comedian far above 
the average. 

The act opens with Miss Hunter pre- 
paring to play a solo and Hallen In the 
dress of a stage hand is preparing the 
stage for her entrance. He misunder- 
stands her orders and brings a small rug 
when she asked for a large one. This 
brings her on and sbe plays a solo. 

At its completion Hallen does a mono- 
logue, the greater part of which consists 
of new and clever material. The act 
closes with a song by Hallen and a well 
played violin obligate. 

The turn is a most pleasing one and 
can easily hold a good position on any 
bill. W. V. 



RAYMOND BOND 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 
Style — Comedy sketch. 

Time— Seventeen minutes. 
Setting— Full stage special. 

Bond, assisted by Elizabeth Shirley, 
appears in his homespun comedy, en- 
titled, "Remnants." The plot is unique 
and well assembled, holding the audience 
in suspense to the curtain. 

The story is a pleasant one and well 
acted by the couple. It tells of an am- 
bitious country youth who goes on the 
road to sell goods. He has obtained bis 
position through persistency and the use 
of a correspondence school book on sales- 
manship. He visits a department store 
and forces his way into the office of the 
buyer. She appears to be much over- 
wrought by bis presence without an- 
nouncement and tries to persuade him 
to get out of the office. He keeps on 
talking, consulting his book as to what 
course to persue next until he* finds that 
the book is all wrong. 

He then throws the book away and 
starts out to do business along different 
lines. He tells the woman about bis 
home and she informs him of a sick sis- 
ter whom she would like to send to a 
farm. He sells ber a quantity of goods 
and then informs ber of the opportunity 
in bis town for a store that will carry 
general merchandise, finally convincing 
her that his town would be the place 
for her and her sister. 

This act went very well with the 
audience in this bouse. It should be one 
well fitted for a feature spot on neigh- 
borhood theatre circuits and occasionally 
find a spot on a two-a-day bill. 

a. r. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 




.*■ u 



CHICAGO 



PHILADELPHIA 



BOSTON 



3AN FRANCISCO CHICAGO Rfl . WitfTiark & SOHS PHILADELPHIA BOSTON 

Pantages Building Sch.ller Building UptOWH Prof. Rooms, AL. COOK, Mgr. 1021 Chestnut St. 218 Tremont St. , 

.AL. BROWNE, Mgr. TOM QUIGLEY, Mgr. 1562 Broadway, Next to Palace Theatre ED. EDWARDS, Mgr. JACK LAHEY, Mgr. 



1021 Chestnut St. 



218 Tremont St. 



i 

*■ ■ 

•ft 
i. 

I 

."=*■ 

rt 

'1: 



/l»n*nVo'j Representative 
Dancers 

ADELAIDE 

and 

HUGHES 



LA 
BERGERE 

Art in Porcelain 
and Marble 

Direction 

FRANK DONNELLY 

NORMAN JEFFBRIES 



NAN 
HALPERIN 



Management 
E. F. Albee 



GEORGE M. 
ROSENER 

The Representative 

Character Actor 

of American 

.V.audez-ille 



CHARLIE 
HOWARD 



Management 
Max Hart 



ELIZABETH 

M. 

MURRAY 



Dir. AlJ. T. Wilton 



SOPHIE 
TUCKER 

and her 5 Kings of 
Syncopation 

M'i't Max Hart 



SYLVESTER 



AND 



VANCE 

in a shit by Wittard Mack 
DIR. PBTB HACK 



ROBERT 

DORE 

The Eminent Barytone 
Direction Paul Durand 



CHAS. McCARRON 

present* 

BETTY 
BOND 

In Five Flights of Musical 

Comedy. Captured By 

Arthur KUin. 



EDYTHE 
9 EDDIE 
ADAIR 

in 

"At the Shoe Shop" 

Uarmtrmenl 
STOKER & BIERBAVER. 



WILLIAM 



HALLEN 



and 
ETHEL 



HUNTER 

■ Direction— Pete Mack 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



GLENN AND BURNS 

Theatre — Proctor's 58th Street. 

Style — Black-face skit. 

Time — Thirteen minutes. 

Settings— fn one. 

These two men have a very novel black 
face torn, in which they portray the role 
of two street cleaners attired in regula- 
tion uniforms and carrying brooms. 

The opening number, a song entitled 
"The Sweeping Man," explains the 
nature of the act, which is carried 
through to the finish in dialogue. The 
talk is unusually interesting and humor- 
ous throughout, the lines being witty and 
amusing. The concluding dance is neatly 
executed and adds greatly to the value 
of the turn. 

It might be suggested that the couple 
obtain a special drop, which will greatly 
add to the merit of the act. 

The turn is well assembled, and should 
prove to be a good attraction as a feature 
turn in neighborhood theatres. A. U. 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

(Continued from page 9) 



WHIPPLE AND HUSTON 

Theatre — Proctor's 58th Street. . 

Style — -Comedy Novelty Sketch. 

Time — Twenty-one minutes. 

Setting — Full stage special. 

This act is billed as a mystery, com- 
edy sensation, under the title of 
"Spooks." To the mind of the writer, 
such billing is somewhat misleading, as 
the entire business is centered upon the 
use of shoes and the talk is about "Life's 
Shop Window," which should be the 
title. 

The turn is a distinct novelty, with 
many humorous lines and situations, that 
amuse the audience. The idea of the 
act is very unique. Both Mrs. Whipple 
and Houston are finished performers, 
and the young man assistant is also quite 
capable. 

The character songs are impressive 
and are rendered in a very satisfactory 
manner. In its entirety, the act is very 
wholesome and, when running smoothly, 
will probably find its way into the two- 
a-day houses. In its present shape, the 
turn can be easily placed in a feature 
spot on three-a-day bills. A. IT. 



MAE CURTIS 

Theatre — Mc'Vicker's, Chicago. 

Style — Character singer. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

As a character singer, Mae Curtis 
possesses originality, offering a re- 
stricted repertoire that few can render 
a.; well as she. Her variety of nut 
material would be a welcome addition 
to an; mad-house. 

The spot alloted her on the bill gave 
her leeway to tickle the fossils' funny- 
bones, and sbe took advantage of the op- 
portunity, scoring readily, especially in 
the spinster number, "My Kingdom for a 
Man." Her representation of the cigar- 
stand girl, in which she imitates nickle- 
nursers and lobbyoglers, went over 
splendidly. 

We would suggest that in her sketch of 
the rube she wear a hay-time hat in- 
stead of the spectacles. 
MeVicker's liked her. P. C. 



ABBOTT AND MILLS 

Theatre — Proctor's t&th Street. 

Style — Comedy skit. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Setting — Special one and two. 

The opening in one of this act, with 
the man and woman appearing against a 
drop and indulging in a pantomimic bit, 
seems rather weak. The woman later 
appears in one, yodling an old-time 
selection and finishing up with a wooden 
shoe dance. The latter could be elimi- 
nated, as the song is rendered in good 
style, and should not be handicapped by 
the dancing endeavor. 

After this number the curtain rises on 
a house in two, with a window being 
used for conversation between the couple. 
The talk routine here is novel and amua- 
inc, but drags along altogether too much. 
There is sufficient substance in the 
turn to make it a pleasing one for the 
second or third spot on the three-a-day 
house bill after it is properly assembled. 

A. U. 



"THE MILLIONAIRE" 

Theatre— Palace, 8. I. 

Act — Musical act. 

Time — Twenty-two minutes. 

Setting — Special boxed set. 

"The Millionaire" is an act billed as 
"A Bridal Bouquet with Music," written 
by Joe Burrowes and presenting seven 
American Beauties and two dandy lions. 
Lotta Baker, Fred Raymond and Jack 
Russell have the leads. 

Everything in the act is special, and 
leading furnishers are given credit for 
their origin. The act contains all the 
elements necessary for a good musical 
act, namely, good actors, good music, ex- 
cellent singing, well staged, and, lastly, 
a plot of sufficient interest to keep the 
people awake. The chorus makes several 
changes in costume, the folly one, in 
which the girls represent dice, cards, 
wine, women, song and gaiety, being 
especially attractive. 

This act should prove a winner in any 
house. H. S. P. 



THE ADAMARS 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Singing skit. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

The act is done in one, with a drop, 
on the right of which is a dry goods 
store. On the left is a bar. Each has 
an entrance. 

The first song is about shopping, in 
which the man and the girl deliver some 
good cross-fire lyrics. More songs fol- 
low, interspersed with talk. When the 
girl sings solos, the man injects comedy 
into the act by frequent visits to the 
bar and, upon each visit, there can be 
heard the ringing of the cash register. 

The talk is original and funny, the 
comedy is good, and the songs are well 
put over. H. G. 



MAUDIE SCOTT AND CO. 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — Parlor. 

"In Tennessee," is a crudely written 
and fairly well acted playlet. 

It deals with the murder of the brother 
of the district attorney, who decides to 
prosecute the murderer vigorously. But, 
after learning that bis brother was killed 
for not treating a certain Tennessee girl 
squarely, he reconsiders his decision and 
tells the newspapers that they are cor- 
rect in their suicide theory. 

The plot is of the old-fashioned, melo- 
dramatic type, and pat on in a passe 
way. For instance, when the half-wit- 
ted boy, who is suspected of the murder, 
creeps into the room, the orchestra plays 
some "villain" music pianissimo. And 
when the Tennessee girl tells the story 
of her life, consuming almost four min- 
utes- without an interruption, the or- 
chestra, muted, plays "The Rosary." 
The playlet should either undergo a 
thorough reconstruction or new material 
should be found for Maudie Scott and 
company. H. G. 



HUNTER AND BAUER 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 
Style — Man-and-girl. 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

Frankie Hunter and Anna Bauer 

have an acceptable turn, in which 

Hunter first does an Italian take-off 

. and later does black face, succeeding with 

both. 

Taken all in all, the work of the pair 
is very clever. Hunter knows how to 
get laughs with his comedy, and Miss 
Bauer puts her songs over nicely. 

The beef stew and chicken talk is not 
particularly funny. Also, when the audi- 
ence starts to applaud. Hunter's telling 
them, "Not Yet!" is very reminiscent 
of McKay, of McKay and Ardine. 

With these bits eliminated, the act 
should be a winner. H. G. 



CAMERON AND CRANE 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Comedy sketch. 

Time — Sixteen minute*. 

Setting— Bo*ed set. 

Two men and a woman are seen in 
this skit, which tells the story of how a 
husband got rid of a gay lothario, who is 
trying to win the favor of his wife, a 
woman who is not disinclined to a little 
flirtation. 

The husband meets the young man as 
he comes in and, as soon as he learns 
who be is, decides to cure him. By a 
line of talk in which he tells the young 
man he is only one of two dozen who pay 
court to his wife, the husband accom- 
plishes bis object and, when the wife 
appears, the youth departs. 

It is a well written skit, with a good 
central idea, well carried out. The lines 
are humorous and call for plenty of 
laughs. The three players do capital 
work. E. W. 



SHAW AND SEABURY 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Ten minutes. 

Setting — Open in one and full stage. 

Opening in "one," with about three 
lines of talk, Shaw and Seabury go into 
a song supposed to tell the audience how 
to dance the Bombashy. The opening, 
however, when the act was seen, was 
marred by the orchestra not getting the 
cue right or, perhaps, the very apparent 
nervousness of the performers. The girl 
in the act next introduced a barefoot 
dance. 

The young man with several superflu- 
ous gestures next put over a corking 
good eccentric dance, which proved that 
he had studied and worked bard to ac- 
complish the difficult routine he had 
chosen. Several "bell" kicks and Rus- 
sian dance steps were roundly applauded. 
As a finish they offer a double eccentric 
number, in which the young man does 
most of the work and the girl neglects 
to point her toes. Several acrobatic 
stunts are attempted, and some Russian 
steps by the man let the act get away 
with a strong hand. S. L. H. 



ROLLINS & NORRIS 

Theatre — Royal. 

Style— Skit. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

It is difficult to suggest any practical 
means of reconstructing this offering, 
which is entitled "A Manhattan Night," 
because, as matters stand, both good ma- 
terial and good talent seem to be lack- 
ing. 

The scene (a drop in one) represents 
night-time in Manhattan. 

Jack Rollins, apparently drunk, enters 
with a toy automobile, which he is 
pulling along, and meets Nena Morris, 
who is waiting for an owl car to take 
her home. There is a lot of weak talk 
which, with the exception of the night 
boat to Albany gag, seems to be original, 
bnt is not sure fire. Several songs are 
poorly rendered. H. G. 



DOROTHY ROGERS AND CO. 

Theatre — City. 
Style — Comedy sketch. 
Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

In her present vehicle, Dorothy 
Rogers is a fortune teller, who tried to 
unite a naggy wife and drunkard hus- 
band. A fourth member of the act im- 
personates the devil. 

The act moves with rapidity and con- 
tains many funny lines. Hobby is glad 
to be rid of his wife and, when the 
crystal gazer orders him to "go to your 
wife or go to the devil" he goes with 
the latter.. 

The setting of the act is especially 
worthy of mention, the weird atmos- 
phere being carried out. ... S. W. 



CONROY AND LE MAIRE 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Comedy skit. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — in one and full stage garden set. 
"For Sale— A Ford" is the title of the 
new offering of Conroy and Le Maire, 
who are assisted by two others in put- 
ting over the latest of their skits. 

The act starts in a street set in which 
Le Maire tells Conroy that he has Col- 
lected some money from an insurance 
company, and that they would now find 
a job running an automobile. 

In the first part of the act the talk 
lacks continuity and, therefore, the 
laughs did not come as fast as expected. 
A police officer finally chases an auto in 
which they are supposed to be riding. 
The speeches of the policeman, who looks 
the part, are quite amateurish. 

The next scene is in a garden setting, 
showing a delapidated Ford car marked, 
for no reason, "Packard." Conroy and 
Le Maire are bidding good-bye to their 
supposed boss. A lot of cross-fire chat- 
ter of the familiar sort and the backing 
and jumping of the machine lead up to 
the finish, in which Le Maire acts as 
driver, while Conroy pulls the car off 
stage. As a successor to the other Con- 
roy and Le Maire laugh festivals, this 
latest skit hasn't a look-in. S. L. H. 



HALLEN AND HUNTER 

Theatre — Riverside. 
Style — Comedy skit. 
Time — Fifteen minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

This is an act put together entirely for 
laughing purposes and it succeeds ad- 
mirably. Miss Hunter Is a good violinist 
and Mr. Hallen is a comedian far above 
the average. 

The act opens with Miss Hunter pre- 
paring to play a solo and Hallen in the 
dress of a stage hand is preparing the 
stage for her entrance. He misunder- 
stands her orders and brings a small rug 
when she asked for a large one. This 
brings her on and ahe plays a aolo. 

At its completion Hallen does a mono- 
logue, the greater part of which consists 
of new and clever material. The act 
closes with a song by Hallen and a well 
played violin obligate. 

The turn is a moat pleasing one and 
can easily hold a good position on any 
bill. W. V. 



RAYMOND BOND 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 
Style— Comedy sketch. 
Time — Seventeen minutes. 
Setting — Full stage special. 

Bond, assisted by Elizabeth Shirley, 
appears in hjs homespun comedy, en- 
titled, "Remnants." The plot is unique 
and well assembled, holding the audience 
in suspense to the curtain. 

The story is a pleasant one and well 
acted by the couple. It tells of an am- 
bitious country youth who goes on the 
road to sell goods. He has obtained his 
position through persistency and the use 
of a correspondence school book on sales- 
manship. He visits a department store 
and forces bis way into the office of the 
buyer. She appears to be much over- 
wrought by his presence without an- 
nouncement and tries to persuade him 
to get out of the office. He keeps on 
talking, consulting his book as to what 
course to persue next until he* finds that 
the book is all wrong. 

He then throws the book away and 
starts out to do business along different 
lines. He tells the woman about bis 
home and she informs bim of a sick sis- 
ter whom she would like to send to a 
farm. He sells her a quantity of goods 
and then informs her of the opportunity 
in his town for a store that will carry 
general merchandise, finally convincing 
her that bis town would be the place 
for her and her sister. 

This act went very well with the 
audience in this house. It should be one 
well fitted for a feature spot on neigh- 
borhood theatre circuits and occasionally 
find a spot on a two-a-day bill. 

a. r\ 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. r AUL KEITH, hattai B. F. ALBEE, V l afm. * ta M*t. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



J ARION RYAN 



KATHRYN RAYMER 



ARION DUO 



The Singing Janitor 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDIE 



JULIA 



SWARTZ — CLIFFORD 



CAN YOU BEER IT? 



DIRECTION ARTHUR HORWITZ 



5 PANDURS 



Novelty Act in Vaudeville 



WORTHY 



FLORENCE 



DUFTY & DAISY 

V.udeviUVa Claedest Cycling Novelty. Direction Alf. T. Wilton 
June 11 — Keith's, Boaton; 18 — Strand, Brockton 



MAX HART PRESENTS "OH BRAZIL" 




Light* Club, Freeport, thii Summer 



LE ROY and BERRY 

S inging, Pamjljg and Comedy, Novelty. In Vaudeville 

FEENEY, MANNING ® KNOLL 

New Act by JOHN P. MEDBURY. Direction TOM JONES 



THE 



MARTIANS 



In "THE ASTRONOMER'S 
DREAM OF MARS.** 

Special Scenery. Everything Original. 



RUSSELL, GREENE and JONES 

Singing — Acrobatic — Dancing 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

kRD and GR 

IN 'THE JUGGLER'S DREAM" 

BOOKED SOLID. SAM BAERW1TZ. REP. 



IVY aild IVY Smoking Stove 



Of VAUDEVILLE 



VELYIM 



IN 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Marcus Loew's Enterprises 

General Executive Office* 
Putnam Building, Times Square, New York 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

General Booking Manager 



Mr. Scbenck PereonaUr Interviews Artist* Daily Between 11 and 1 

Boston Office: Tremout Tluatre Building 
FRED MARDO, in charce 



Chicago Omcet North American Bolldma; 
FRANK Q. DOYLE, ta charce 



Acta laying off in Southern territory wire thie office. 



C. H. HASKELL, Mgr— IDA BUTLER— SAM GILLETT1 



HARMONY SINGING 



T THE FIVE MARTELLS "UHP 



WEEHAWKEN, P. O., N. J. 



ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOW RY " Jests and Jigs" 

•"»***■ ^*»«*^ ~ V *•* ^** •*•* BY TOMMY CRAY 



THE WORLD WONDER DANCERS 

With 'THE LOVE MILL" Vaudeville 



GERTIE EVADNE Dc MILT 

THE GIRL WITH THE SMILE— IN VAUDEVILLE 

SPIEGEL and JONES 

IN A COLORED SPASM Written by OTTO T. JOHNSON 



BERNARD ADELE C. 

WHEELER & POTTER 



In a Phoney Episode 



In Vaudeville 



•SACK 



MATT 



CAMPBELL & MEEKER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOB & PEGGY VALENTINE 

"Vital Statistics"— A New Comedy Act in "One" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

Harry K. Morton % Zella Russell 

THE LAUGH PROMOTERS 

VIRGINIA. KELSY 

DOUBLE VOICE PRIMA DONNA 



HERBERT 



TR1XIE 



HOEY ano SMITH 

COMEDY— SONG— DANCE Direction, JACK LEWg 

HARRY KEENE & WILLIAMS "*■ 

A Real Comedy Act in One. Special Scenery 

NOW PLAYING _ 

sammy — GOLD & SEAL— EU 

Those Champagne Boys in "BITS OF VARIETY" 

DIRECTION ROSE A CURTIS 

WHITE and GREEN |? N i S 

m VAUDEVILLE " CASEY AGENCY 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



(Continued from Pat* •) 



AUDUBON 

(U*t Half) 

The show was opened by the Pour 
Nigh tons, a quartette of neat appearing 
acrobats. 

They start their turn with some classy 
posing and devote the latter half of their 
offering to acrobatic feats. Most of the 
work is very effective, and the under- 
stander, upon whom the brunt of the work 
falls, is very capable. 

Stanley and Burns start off with a 
song, after which they confine themselves 
to fancy stepping. They are adepts in 
their line of work, and, while they at- 
tempt nothing particularly new, what 
they do, is done excellently. Their ex- 
ceptionally neat appearance is an asset 
to the act. 

Harry Smith & Company, who have 
appeared at several "big time" houses 
under a different name, present a playlet 
concerning a man who lets his wife do 
nil the work and pay the rent while he 
looks around for a "soft thing" which 
never seems to materialize. Tbey give a 
good performance, and the lines in . the 
playlet extracted considerable mirth. 

Following a Keystone Comedy, en- 
titled, "Her Fame and Shame," the Great 
Howard gave his familiar ventriloquistic 
skit and, as usual, won approval. He 
should not, however, sing two trench 
songs. One is sufficient. He introduced 
a march song of his own creation which 
made such a decided hit that he was 
forced to repeat the chorus again and 
again. 

Jack Harris & Company started off 
better than they ended. The burglar en- 
trance and the ensuing dialogue is very 
original and funny, but the hokum that 
follows is too much of a jumble of every- 
thing in general and nothing in particular, 
to be redeemed only by the dance with 
which Harris concludes the act. The 
"company" consists of his partner, who 
does almost as much as he and is de- 
serving of bis name on the billing. 

Andy Lewis and a company of two 
closed the show. If the billing had not 
announced the fact that Andy Lewis was 
the feature of the act, this reviewer 
would have given that credit to the girl, 
as she is undoubtedly the cleverest mem- 
ber of the trio. In fact, her song num- 
bers are the best things in the turn and 
she puts them over with great effect. 

H. G. 



PROCTOR'S 58th STREET 

(Lut Half) 

The opening act was Vandermeer, billed 
as the "sensational equilibrist." Her 
work is neatly presented and executed, 
especially the wire walking feats. 

Quinn & Lafferty, in second position, 
bad things all their own way, with song, 
chatter and dancing. The dramatic offer- 
ing of "Danny" seemed to please the 
patrons considerably. It is one of those 
human interest turns which seems to have 
been especially designed for neighborhood 
theatres. 

Inez Lawson, a singing comedienne, 
has a nice voice and a pleasing manner. 
Her first three songs are very appro- 
priate for the turn but there is no rea- 
son why anybody should use two pa- 
triotic numbers to conclude an act. 

Jessell & Martin had rather an easy 
time following, in their novel turn. The 
audience seemed to get the trend of the 
turn very quickly and seemed to enjoy 
it throughout. Jessell should eliminate 
the pipe smoking bit as it does not fit 
in at all with a jnvenille character offer- 
ing. 

Phina, with her Picks, now fully 
grown, is still offering a routine of songs 
and character and eccentric dances which 
please. The concluding dancing number 
caused the act to be the hit of the bill. 

The show closed with Cecile & Fran- 
cois \n a novelty singing and acrobatic 
dancing offering, which is reviewed under 
*-ew Acta. A. U. , 



PROCTOR'S 23RD STREET 

(Lut Half) 

The show was opened by Bicknell, the 
clay modeller, who shaped the features of 
many prominent persons on a board. 
Next on the program came Nolan & Wild 
who are reviewed under new acts. 

Grindell & Esther, with their chatter, 
songs and dances pleased immensely. 
Their finishing dance is an eccentric 
novelty and should be the means of en- 
hancing the value of the act in the 
neighborhood theatres. 

"Milady's Gown," a draping act, was 
in the fourth position and is reviewed un- 
der New Acts. Earle & Sunshine have 
a very novel character offering of songs. 
dances, chatter and whistling specialties. 
Both of the women possess talent and 
ability, doing their individual specialties 
iu a manner which quickly receives the 
approbation of the audience. Their 
church bit and dances of other days, which 
conclude the turn, were the stellar parts 
of the act. 

Burke & Burke appeared in their 
comedy skit "The Messenger Boy and 
The Lady." This act is a big laughing 
turn, but it might be wise for Burke to 
refrain from getting "peeved" when his 
gags do not go over. On Thursday after- 
noon, two failed to get over, so he re- 
marked to his partner that they "went 
to the bottom." Another remark he made 
in a little above the usual stage whisper 
regarding the audience was "I'm talking 
to fishes. They're a lot of wise guys." 

Dave Roth was in the next spot with 
his pianologue. For bis opening he is 
making bis entrance a la Leo Beers. 
Then he comes along with Joe Towle's 
picture bit. doing everything but the 
"powder puff" stunt in the offering. An- 
other one of Towle's stunts is the request 
number, he playing the same tune all the 
time. 

Roth has ability and there is no reason 
at all why he should resort to other peo- 
ples material to put his act over. 

Frankie Hunter and Inez Bauer in their 
character comedy skit proved to be the hit 
of the bill. 'Sprague and McNeese in their 
roller skating novelty closed the show. 

A. TJ. 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

Sol Levoy opened the vaudeville bill ai 
Thursday's matinee with a couple of pop- 
ular songs. 

The Curtis Trio followed. The act is 
too long on noise and too short on har- 
mony. Although the woman of the trio 
has no voice to speak of, she sings very 
loudly. She should tone down her voice 
and "talk" her numbers as much ns pos- 
sible. The man would also get a better 
effect if he put on the soft pedal. 

Putnam and Lewis, an Italian and a 
straight, got a lot of laughs out of their 
cross fire material. The man's ballad 
number went over very nicely. 

Arthur Edwards and Company pre- 
sented a playlet entitled, "Neglect," which 
will be reviewed under New Acts. 

Following a Keystone Comedy, Kauf- 
man and Lillian scored with a turn which 
will be reviewed under New Acts. 

Will Oakland and Company have an ac- 
ceptable offering in which Oakland's Irish 
tenor voice stands out as the feature. All 
ot his song numbers brought big applause. 
Tbe girl in the act makes a charming stage 
picture and the old Irish father gives a 
splendid characterization. 

Tommy Haydn depicted the "silly ass" 
type of Englishman and did his familiar 
baseball dialogue. He carried off fifst 
honors of the bill, due largely to his danc- 
ing. While his singing and talk both 
score, it is his dancing that makes his turn 
stand ont. It would be a good idea for 
Haydn to put still another dance into his 
routine. 

The show was closed by the Four 
Chinese, a classy musical turn which will 
receive its'review nnder New Acts. H. G. 



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22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 191/" 



phiHp AUSTIN&BAILEY l-> 



IN "A SYNCOPATED HOTEL" 



DIRECTION PETE MACK 



MARY L.MAXFIELD 

Little Miss Personality 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



A HOLIDAY IN DIXIELAND 

lO -PEOPLE- -IO 
WITH 

Will MASTIN and Virgie RICHARDS 



In a CycIooU Bunt oi Mirth. Malody and Dndai 

Directfcu HARRY A. SHEA 



BENTELL BROS 

Acrobatic Dancers * 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



PLAYING U. & O. 



STONE & LE SOIR 

PRESENTING 

12 ROYAL TROUBADOURS 

Singers and Instrumentalists 

Diractbm-LEE MUCKENFUSS 



4 Ft. S 

of Ragtime 

In Wo. a FriodUndWi Inc. "The S uff ianeUo Rerue. 
Under Pergonal MuMOMal BART. H. McHUGH 



SAM 



OAKLAND 



JOHNNY 



MARION 



JONES and GREENLEE 



"WHAT DID YOU DO?" 



Direction H. Bart. McHugh 



JIM 



BEATRICE 



McINTYRE and WYNNE 

Comedy, Singing, Dancing in One 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



WILLIE 



JAMES 



IN AMATEUR NIGHT 

THOSE TWO BOYS IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOOKED SOLID 



GAINES & HOWARD 

IN THE BOSS'S CLOTHES-^SEEN 'EM YET? 
IN VAUDEVILLE ■ 

HELENE VINCENT 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

LINTON and WATSON 

Com*dy Talldn* Act, EatlHrd 

"She Aulo Know*' 

johnme KENNY and LaFRANCE ■" 

PREMIER DANCERS Direction TOM JONES 

— COLLINS & WEST— « 

In a Comedy Skit, "The Book Agent" Direction, WENONAH TENNEY 



THE GIRL. FROM 
BRIGHTON 

ENCHANTRESS OF RAGTIME ALLEY. 



KITTY FLYNN 



BOOKED SOLID 



ZITA LYONS 

"Venus of the Show World" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Wm. 



NA/IHIT 

In a Song or Two and a Dance or So 

IN VAUDEVILLE 




Ada 



ANNA MARIE 

DAINTY COMEDIENNE IN VAUDEVILLE 

FANNIE 

EL 

"TAKING CHANCES." 



BILLIE 

BELMONT 

Direction MARK LEVY 



SKATING VENUSES 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Dir»cUon HARRY WEBER 



ll_ 

Upside Down Comedians 



DIRECTION WENONAH M TENNEY 



FRANKIE FAY 



Of VAUDEVILLE 



MAY 



RAE 



LARINE and CRAWFORD 

In Piano, Violin and Songs 

VAUDEVILLE 



FOUR MUSICAL KLEISES 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

henry LOWY & LACEY SE5TERS 

ECCENTRICITIES rN SONGS AND DANCES 

JOSEPHINE LENHART 

The Diminutive Songster , N vaudeville 

EARY & EARY 

WHIRLWIND NOVELTY GYMNASTS NEW TO THE EAST 



L. Y L, 



& HARRIS 



The Diminutive Pair, Present "In the Hallway" 

A NOVELTY SKIT IN ONE 



TANEAN BROTHERS 



WeeK 28, _ 

ORPHEUM, DETROIT 

.. . Week June 4, 
MILES, CLEVELAND 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 




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Atlantis * Fi»k 
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Billings. Jas. J. 

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Box, Ed L 

Binra. Nlcoolw 

Barry. Bobby 
Bard. Ban 
Brower, Tom L. 

Br/nt, mllle 
Brower, WalUT 
Ballrr. Ted 
Collltu, Milt 



Bennett Victoria 
Ilnxlcrlck, Lillian 
Blanry, Jar 
Brook. Virginia 
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Qrnsus, Viola 
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Clark, Geo. A. 

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firatiiby. John E. 
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GoUschalk. L. 

Franels 
Gravis. Geo. L. 
(ithatan. Wm. 
Gray, Julian 
Green, John 
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rientle, Flo 



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STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 

(Continued from page 31) 

SYRACUSE CO. TREATS SOLDIERS 

Syracuse, N. Y., June 9. — The Knick- 
erbocker Plnyers at the Empire Theatre 
gave a special performance of "FotaBh and 
Perlmutter" for the soldiers of the regular 
army who were stationed here, temporarily. 
More than 2,000 attended the performance. 
M. 10. YV..11F gave the use of the theatre 
nnd paid all attendant expense. The or- 
chestra, stage bands and attaches also gave 
their services. Only soldiers in uniform 
were admitted, no seats 'being sold to the 
public. 



DEVEREAUX CO. IN CINCINNATI 

Cincinnati. June, 11. — The Deveraux 
Players opened a two week's engagement 
at the Woodland Theatre, Zoological 
Gardens, yesterday, with "Everyman." 
The company recently concluded an en- 
gagement of one-night stands and rested 
for awhile here. During that time, Mr. 
Devereaux rehearsed "Learned Ladies," 
one of the latest plays added to the Dever- 
eaux repertoire. George P. Smithneld is 
doing character parts with the company 
this season. Richard Hogan is a new 
member also. Viola Knott continues as 
the featured plnyer. 



VEES CO. PLAYING TO CAPACITY 

Wheeling, W. Va., June 8. — The Al- 
bert Vees Stock Co., now in their fifth 
week at the Victoria Tbeatre, are play- 
ing to capacity at nearly every perform- 
ance. The roster of the company in- 
cludes Sam. C. Miller and J. B. Ball, pro- 
prietors; Albert S. Vees, leading man; 
Florence Lcwin, leading woman ; Hal Mor- 
dannt, Frank Hawkins. Percy Kilbride, 
Marie Harcourt, Eva Sargent, Margaret 
Ryan, Harry Steger, and Irving Young, 
scenic artist. 



PLAYERS ENGAGED 



Joe Ruben by Arthur Hopkins. 



John Webster by G. M. Anderson for 
"The Very Idea." 



Chas. Judels. by the Shuberls, for "The 
Beautiful Unknown." 



Carl McCulIough by Arthur Hammer- 
stein for three years. 



DUFRANE WITH PARK CO. 

New Bedford, Mass., June 11. — Frank 
It. Dufrane is starting rehearsals to-day 
at Forrest Lake Park as leading man of 
the stock company, which opens at the 
park for the Summer. The company will 
be known -as the Park Stock Co. and will 
open in "Under Cover." 



The Fairbanks Twins by F. Ziegfeld, 
Jr., for a term of years. 



Sidoni Espero by Elliott, Comstock & 
Gest for "Kitty Darlin.' " 



Marietta Craig by Clark Ross Attrac- 
tions Co. for "The Reason." 



BENNETT OPENS IN FRISCO 

Sax Francisco, June 9. — Richard Ben- 
nett opened at the bead of his stock com- 
pany, Monday, at the Alcazar Theatre, in 
"The Cinderella Man." One of the plays 
of his repertoire will be the premiere of 
Augustus Thomas' "The Copperhead." 



Ned Munroe by the Messrs. Shubert for 
"The Beautiful Unknown." 



Joseph Santley bv F. Ray Comstock and 
William Elliott for "Oh Boy." 



LZ 



DEATHS 



LAMBS HOLD GAMBOL AUCTION 

The auction sale of seats for the forth- 
coming Lambs Gambol was held yesterday 
afternoon in the - Hudson Theatre. The 
Gambol will be held at the, Manhattan 
Opera House June 17 and a matinee the 
following day. 

HORN TO REOPEN LABOR DAY 

The Fifth Avenne Stock Co., under the 
management of Jack Horn, which recently 
closed at the Fifth Avenue Theatre, 
Brooklyn, is scheduled to reopen Labor 
Day. 



BRADY WILL CASE POSTPONED 

The trial of the contest of the will of 
James Buchanan ("Diamond Jim") Brady- 
has been postponed until October. 



MRS. ELIZABETH PETERS, widow of 
the late Charles Peters and professionally 
known as Mrs. Charles Peters, died May 30 
in her 84th year. She appeared on the stage 
until after her 79th birthday and with one 
exception was the oldest living; actress. 
She resided at Morsemere. N. J., and Is sur- 
vived by her daughter, Mrs. Mathllde Desh- 
on and her son, Fred W. Peters, as -well as 
by three grandchildren and one great grand- 
child. 

ANNIE HARRISON, one of the oldest ac- 
tresses on the American stage, died last 
week at Amltyvllle. L. I. She was 70 years 
old and had flrst appeared here nearly half 
a century ago. She had appeared in sup- 
port of Lillian Russell and a score of other 
stars. Recently she had been associated 
with a costumer. 

PEGGY KEY SCOTT, a stock ingenue, 
died recently In St. Ann's Hospital, Chicago, 
aged twenty-four years. She is survived by 
her husband and baby son, the former be- 
ing well known as director at the Academy 
and Criterion Theatres, Chicago. Burial 
was made In Milwaukee, Wis. 



AGENTS 

GET THE LATEST 

Make Bif Mousy Sail in. 

Photo - Handlad Knrns 

for Punch Boards 

Knlres made with the latest real 
ART. SEPTEMBER MO RN. JESS 
WILLABD and OTHER ATTRACT- 
IVE DESION8. We want scents In 
•very city and town. We msnofne- 
tore onr own knives and, therefore, 
we ara not dependent on foreign 
supplies. All shipments can tie made 
promptly. V7B ARB THB LARGEST 
MANUFACTURERS AND DIS- 
TRIBUTORS OF PHOTO-HANDLED 
KNIVES FOR PUNCH BOARDS 
AN D R ABTU CARDS IN THE 
UNITED STATES. Write 01 and 
wa will see that yon are prompt'? 
supplied. Ask for catalogue and 
terms today. 

GOLDEN RULE CUTLERY CO. 
tlS No. Sheldon St. Dent. TO, Chicago 



Jack Housh 
Kathryn LaVelle); 



WHEN THE WORM TURNS 



Wsetarn Rspraaentativa WAYNE CHRISTY 
Eastern Representative PETE MACK 

Who'a th. First N. V. A. Widow? ME I 



CHARLES 




and 

IRENE 



SHAW 

NOW IN VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION BILLY ATWELL 



MERCEDES 



BOB FINLAY 

and DOROTHY 

Offering 

" A Bit 0" This and That" 

N. V. A. 

DIRECTION PETE MACK 



SLAYMAN ALI 

«r Producer of s: 

ORIENTAL NOVELTIES 

TS4 8th Awaw New York 
Phone Bryant 89S0 



B. T. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway * 17tb st . 

Hat. Dally at 2 P. M. 

88, 60 and 73e. 

Br err Night 

2S-50-T5-IM1.50. 



NORA BATES, GEO. 
WHITE * SKMA HAIO, 
TEMPEST * STOBHXNX, 
BERT LETT, OALITOR. 
MIA BOTE' BAND, AL. 
ROCKWELL * OEO. 
WOOD, WALTER BROW. 
ER. PHINA A HER 
PXOE8, AUSTRALIAN 
CBUQHTONS. 



if—' rf-_ fa T West <8th St., Phone- Brjant iO. 

^^^-"^ M Eri. at 8.20. lists. Wed. A S«t. 

10th CROWDED MONTH 

UPSTAIRS s DOWN 

BT FREDERIC AND FANNY HATTON 



M0R0SC0 



THEATRE. 45th St. Welt 
of Broadwaj. Era. 8:20. 
Mats. Wed. A 8at. 2:90. 
OliTar Moroaoo praasnta tss laughing asaaatloa 

THE BRAT 

87 MAUDE FtJXTON 

"Batter than 'Per O' Mj Heart' " — ETX. Sim. 



GAIETY 



THEATRE. B'war A «eth 
St. Bees, st 8,-jo. Mats. 
Wed. A Bat. st 2.2n. 
WXNOHXLL SMITH and JOHN L. OOLDEaT 
Prwawnt the aaaaon'a aneewas 

TURNTOTHERIGHT 



PETE MACK 

Artists' Representative, 

Can handle a limited number of 
high class attractions 



Palace Theatre Bldg. 

I'hona Bryant ]71t 



ALVIN and 

ANDY 

WILLIAMS 

Sailing from Vancouver June 6th, 
Aboard the Niagara for 

Australia 
RICKARD'S CIRCUIT 



PEP COMEDIANS 

THEODORE BILLY 

PANKEY McCARVER 

THE DEVIL AND THE 
WHITEWASH MAN 

Singing, Dancing anal Talking 



Central Fibre Wardrobe 
$35.00 




f«uf to (he 
image $60.60 

w.idroi* aid 
GUJUtANWD 

CENTRAL. RUNK 
FACTORY 

SIMONS a CO. 

JOS Arch St. 

Phils- 



"The Theatrical 
Route" 

Comfortable steamers leave New 
York, Pier 32, N. R., foot Canal 
St. 6.00 P.M., West 132d St. 6.30 
P.M. daily, including Sunday; also 
Sunday morning at 9.30 for Al- 
bany, Troy and the North. 

Save money 
Travel in comfort 

HUDSON NAVIGATION COMPANY 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



BUD WALKER 

The Versatile Boy 

Managers take notice for nest a — son. Does everything but a Back Flip. 
SEE JACK McGANN 



ED. F. REYNARD Presents 

MLLE. 


MLLE. BIANCA Presents 
ED. F. 


Bl ANCA 


REYNARD 


In a Series of Dramatic 
Dance Poems. 


The Ventriloquial Comedian, 
in "BEFORE THE COURT." 



The Nelson Trio 



BANJOS AND XYLOPHONE 



HIGH-CLASS MUSICAL ACT 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DENA 



THORNTON 



CARYLL & FLYNN 



Prima Donna and Irish Tenor 



IN VARIED OFFERING OF MELODY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



WHITE BROS 

Trie XIp-Xop Boys 

Direction Lew Golder 



GILMORE & LcMOYNE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DANCING VIOLINIST 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Beatrice McKenzie 

in a Singing Novelty Assisted by R A YE DUNN 
Direction FRANK EVANS 



EDDIE MARGIE BILLY 

DeLite.Stewart.Hardy 



20th Century Trio in Song, Dance and Patter 



Rep. Tom Jonas 



ADELAIDE CONLEY 

REFINED SINGING 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



D A.V E 



FRED 



FOX»"lnAYO 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction LEW LESLIE 



AMERICA'S FAVORITE . 

BARNEY O'MARA 



Singing Irish Comedian 



In Vaudeville 



Dave Station 



Dewey Weinglas* 



4-DANGING DEMONS-4 

ACROBATIC, ECCENTRIC AND RUSSIAN DANCING 

Lillian William. Direction. Chan. Fitxpatrick Madge Davis 



THERESA L. MARTIN 



In Vaudeville 

N. V. A. 



Featuring Hawaiian String Quartet 

BIRLINGTON FOUR 



In ««Hokemvllle M 

PERSONAL DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 



-vttfc 




Assisted by FLOR D'ALIZA 
Presenting Their Wonderful Rooster* 
Chas. Bornhaupt Keeps Them Crowing. 



JACK M. SYDNEY 

Versatile Entertainer Singing and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



BILLY 



BETTY 



KIMBALL and KENNETH 

Novelty Banjo Entertainers. Originators of Hawaiian Steel Banjo, 

Playing Loew Time . Direction Mark Levy 



ELEANOR FISHER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



ANDREW COPELAND 

America's Premier Colored Singing Comedian 

Direction— PETE MACK. IN VAUDEVILLE 



ADA. 



PAUUNE 



Billsbury and Robison 

Comedy, Singing, Talking and Dancing N. V. A. Direction Frank Evan* 



LEW SHARP 



RUBE GOLDIE 



5 MERRY YOUNGSTERS 



HARRY GOODMAN 

DIRECTION LEE MUCKEKFU5S 



Fun — Fast and Furious 

JOHN GREEN MACK COLEMAN 

June «-«, Bridgeport, Conn.; 7-9 Waterbury, Conn. 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



CINCINNATI 

Neil McGuire, stage manager, and Gus 
Uchteman, "prop.," are again at the Ches- 
ter Park Opera House, starting on their 
tenth successive seaso.i as monarchs of 
back stage at the park. 

The Queen City Ice Skating Rink Com- 
pany, formed to erect an ice skating rink 
on Walnut Hills, announces that it will 
defer its project until after the war. The 
investors' funds will be put into Liberty 
Bonds in the meantime. 

The Cincinnati Screen League has been 
organized by Cincinnati men and women 
interested in "the development of the mo- 
tion picture art and industry." W. C. 
Culkins is president. 

Charles Weidner, who left the assistant 
treasuryship of the Grand Opera House to 
manage a theatre at Decatur, 111., is back 
in town and probably will be at the Grand 
•next season. 



AGED SCENE ARTIST DIES 

Joseph Clare, a veteran scenic artist, 
died June 3 in the Central Islip (L. I.) 
Hospital, aged seventy-one years. The 
deceased was born in England and, at the 
age of thirteen was apprenticed to Wm. 
Bronson, of the Theatre Royal, Liverpool, 
England. Four years later he became 
hond scene painter for that house. In 
1865 he was engaged in a similar capacity 
at the Theatre Royal, Portsmouth, and 
while there formed a friendship with 
•Charles Dickens which lasted till the 
latter's death. 

GROSS WITH "MATINEE GIRLS" 

Akdmore, Okla., June 9. — William 
Gross is featured with "The Matinee 
Girl" tabloid musical comedy company, 
now on its tenth month throughout the 
South and Southwest, playing the Bar- 
bour circuit. Mr. Gross is producing his 
own bills, also doing the principal comedy. 
The roster is as follows: Frank DeAtley, 
manager ; William Gross, principal com- 
edy ; Billy Hanley. second comedy ; Mar- 
tea Smith, straight; Gladys Jackson, 
soubrette; Hazel McCann, character; 
Ruth Barron, ingenue, and a chorus of 
six girls and a musical director. 



CHOOSE SKETCH FOR GAMBOL 

One of the features of the Lambs All- 
Star Gambol, which will take place Sun- 
day night and Monday afternoon at the 
Manhattan Opera House, will be the 
presentation of a dramatic sketch entitled, 
"Time Will Tell," written by Percival 
Knight. Those to appear in the sketch 
are: Henry Kolker, W. B. Mack, George 
LeGuere, Richard Tabor, Morgan Coman, 
Pnrnell Pratt, Crauford Kent and Tom 
McGrath. The sketch was presented at a 
private performance in the Lambs last 
winter. 

JURY ACQUITS MOVIE MANAGER* 

Sioux City, la., June 8. — L. E. Carnes, 
manager of a local motion picture theatre 
has been acquitted of violating the Iowa 
bine laws, in spite of the fact that he ad- 
mitted having kept his theatre open last 
Sunday. It took a jury composed of busi- 
ness men seven minutes to render a verdict 
which is takeu as an indication of the 
liberal attitude that may be expected of 
any jury called upon to try a blue law 
case in this city. 



ALICE DOVEY MARRIES HAZZARD 

Jack Hazzard, the comedian who ap- 
peared this season in "Miss Springtime," 
and Alice Dovey, who is a member of the 
cast of "Very Good Eddie," were married 
in the "Little Church Around the Corner," 
last Wednesday. They left for Milwau- 
kee on their honeymoon where they went 
to attend the opening of "Dewdrop Inn." a 
musical comedy of which the bridgeroom 
I* co-author. 



WILLIAM TRA VERS RE-MARRIED 
William Traver.s. actor, and husband of 
the late Blanche Walsh, was married last 
week to Olive Elizabeth Shirley, who re- 
cently appeared in James K. Hackett's 
production of "Macbeth." The ceremony 
took place at the Central Park Presby- 
terian Church. Mr. Travers took charge 
last Saturday of the Ross-Fenton farm at 
Asbury Park, for the summer season. 



HUBER. WILL TO BE PROBATED 

Surrogate Cohalan last week ordered 
that the second will of the late George H. 
Huber, owner of the famous old Huber's 
Dime Museum, be admitted to probate, in 
spite of the contest against it Sled by re- 
latives. By the first will, Huber left a 
large sum to his nephew, but revoked this 
in his second will, and left the bulk of his 
$500,000 to his young widow. 



CALLED SPY, ACTOR SUES 

Robert Kegerrels, a member of the 
Players' Club, has instituted a suit in the 
Supreme Court against Edward S. Van 
Zile, an author and fellow member of the 
club. He asks for $5,000 damages for de- 
famation of character, alleging that Van 
Zile, in the presence of members of the 
club, bad accused him of being a traitor 
and spy. 



SABBATARIANS KILL BILL 

Haurisbuf.g, Pa.. June 7. — Ministers, 
officers of the State Sabbath School As- 
sociation and various church organizations 
registered their protests last night against 
the Croft Bill to permit the Philadelphia 
Orchestra to give Sunday concerts and 
charge an admission fee, with the result 
that the bill was killed. 



MODISTES SUE ACTRESS 

Mrs. Olive Celeste Moore White, wife of 
Archibald Sylvester White, the broker, and 
a former actress, was named as defendant 
in the Supreme Court last week in an 
action to recover $10,519 for wearing ap- 
parel, said to have been purchased from 
Jane and Andree, local modistes, during 
the last two years. 

NOTED BAND PLAYS FOR FRIARS 

The Republic Band gave a concert for 
the entertainment of the Friars last Sun- 
day night in the great hall of their club- 
house. The band was passing through 
New York on its way to play at the 
White House for President Wilson, and 
volunteered to play for the Friars. 

DRAMATIC CRITIC MARRIES 

Heywood Broun, late dramatic critic of 
the Xpw York Trilmiie and Uuth Hale, 
newspaperwoman, and press representative 
for Arthur Hopkins, were married in St. 
Agnes's Church last week. The ceremony 
was informal, and the guests included only 
relatives and immediate friends. 



SINGER GETS DIVORCE 

Mme. Margarete Matzenauer Fontana, of 
the Metropolitan Opera Co., has been 
granted a divorce from her husband, 
Edoardo Fcrrari-Fontana. She also won 
the custody of their child. 



ROWE LEAVES FOR SUMMER 

Philadelphia. June 10.— Manager H. 
E. Rowe, of "The Unborn Child" Co., 
which closed here last night, will leave at 
once for his Summer home in Muskegon. 
Mich. 



HOPKINS WRITES BOOK 

Arthur Hopkins has written a book 
dealing with the affairs of the stage, en- 
titled, "How Is Your Second Act?" which 
will be on the book stands next week. 

PARKER WRITES PEACE MASQUE 

The Century Theatre will he the scene of 
the performances of "The Masque of Peace 
and War," to be given next month. Louis 
N. Parker is the author. 



GREELEY LEASES MAINE HOUSE 

Cape Cottage. Me., June 9. — James W. 
Greeley has obtained a lease on the Cape 
Theatre and will inaugurate a policy of 
vaudeville and motion pictures the latter 
part of this month. 



BILLY WAGNER LOSES FATHER 

Cincinnati, June 7. — Herman A. 
Wagner, father of Billy Wagner, of the 
team of Kane and Wagner, died last Fri- 
day at his home in this city. 



WM. EDWARDS ENLISTS 

St. Louis. June S. — William Edwards, a 
performer, has enlisted in the artillery. 



MADGE LOCK 

THE GLOOM DISPELLER 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



KATE MULLINI PRESENTS 



6 ROYAL HUSSAR GIRLS 



In m Melange of Music and Song 



In Vaudeville 




And Brazil! 

Always working. There's a Reason 



Nuts 

Ask MARK LEVY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



JULIA CURTISS 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



In Vaudeville 



Direction Samuel Baerwitz 



IMOGENE COMER 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



GERTRUDE HARRY 

1VI ILLIIMGXOISI & PAULI 

In Their Own Original Idea — "LOVE AND WAR" 



ME INNINGS 

REFINED COMEDY NOVELTY OFFERING DIRECTION CHAS. F1TZPATRICK 



MARIA 



The Smiling Accordionist 



BOOKED 



OLIO 



GEORGIA CAMPBELL 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ipM*M*VM±^^*.^^^^^^^^^KK*.'-*w.*.K ........... 



CHICAGO CABARET STARS i 



FLORENCE INGERSOLL 

Julian Eltinge said: "The most graceful dancer I ever saw." 
WINTER GARDEN, CHICAGO 



ADAH SUMMERHILL 

("BUSTER BROWN") 

Entre Nous— In Song Revues 



an 



* BEBE McINTYRE 

(ROSIE OGRADY) 

Winter Garden, Chicago 



LILLIAN BERNARD 

Kansas City Favorite 

Conireu Cafe, Chicago, Indef. 

DOROTHY 0VERMIRE 

Singing High Class Ballads in First-Class 
Loop Cabarets — Chicago. 

ANITA GRAY 

Singing Ballads, Indefinitely at the Tavern, 
Park, Chicago. 



CHARLES JORDAN 

SIXTH MONTH 

Statee Cafe Revue, Chicago 

MAUD MASSEY VAN BERGEN 

Lady Director of Orchestra, De Luxe Cafe, 

Chicago. 



LOOS BROTHERS 



KINGS OF 

SYNCOPATION 

5 months at Marigold Follies, Bismarck Car- 
dens. Now Singing at Jackson P«rV Tavern 
Beautiful, Chicago. 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



JOHNNY 



MATT1E 



MACKand 



N. V. A. 



Milk and Melody 
Direction IRVING SHANNON 



In Vaudeville 



HERBERT 



LEW 



PIANO AND SONG COMEDY 

BOOKED SOLID 



MAY AND BILLY EARLE 



Present 
"LOVE ME, LOVE MY DOG" By Otto T. Johnson, Assisted by the Dog 



RUTH and BOB 

THE CHRISTIES 

The Musical Act With a Punch 

JACK FLYN1*. REPRESENTATIVE 




NAMLOH and NEB 

In a Scenic Production 

"A WYVERN'S DEN'* 

Loew Time Direction Sam Baerwitx 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

M ME DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Direction STOKER oV BIERBAUER 



HARRY PEASE 

Ny ■ Question — Why is fae always working? Question — Who is bis representative? 

.?. A. Answer—Because he's get THE material. Answer— NAT SOB EL 



The American 
Entertainer" 



BILLIE ARGYLE JOE FENN 

THE ALL AMERICAN FOUR 

HARMONY SINGING 



HARRY FENN 



H. P. FORSYTHE 



JIMMIE 



WILLIE 



MARSHALL ©. COVAN 

The Dancing Masters D >r«t from & w„« 

NOW PLAYING THE LOEW TIME 

HARRY SHEA, Euttm Director NED NESTOR, Western Director 



JACK 



NELLIE 



ORBEN and DIXIE 

In Southern Songs and Dances 

Playing Loew Circuit Address Care Clipper 



PHYLLIS EUGENE 

CURWOOD and GORMAN 

Before the Honeymoon and After 

By HERMAN KAHN 

* Copyrtf otad 




Direction HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 

AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 

U. B. O. — BIG TIME 



EDNA WINSTON TRIO 

NOW PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 



DIRECTION CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



GALLARINI & SON 

Featuring the Boy Accordionist and Instrumentalist 

Now Being Featured on the U. B. O. Time 
DIRECTION— ALF T. WILTON 



THE NOVELTY FOUR 

Slim, Elmer, Cy and Heinie send a Hello to their friends. 

DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



IP 


HYLE 


and 


F»HYLE 




la Their Latest Comedy Success 




Nearly 


a Jockey 




IN 


VAUDEVTLLE 





FRANCIS 



FRANK 



WOOD and WARNOCK 

Novelty Act — In Vaudeville 



li 



The Kentucky Girl 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



FRANCES CORNELL 

"A FASHIONPLATE IN SONGLAND" 

Exclusive Material In Vaudeville 



BOXY 



DICK 



WILSON and STEWART 



2 Boys and a Piano 
n. v. A. 



ORIGINAL 



COLONIAL TRIO 



MAUD KELLY 
Harpist 



F«a taring 

MARTIN KEARY 
DIRECTION JACK SHEA 



KATHRIN HULLING 

Soprano 



Ray Lynch 



A BIG SURPRISE 



Arthur Clay 



FOUR AMERICAN BEAUTIES 

Fred Slater Direction of WENONAH M. TENNEY i jew p^ 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



U. B. O. 

HEW TOSK CITT. 

Falaos — Norm Bayes — Bernard GranTille— The 
Brtde Shop — Eob[n«— The Gandsmldts. (Two to 
BID 

Colonial — Avellng & LJoyd^Jack Norwortli & 
Lillian Lorraine — Backoff & Girlie — John T. Bay 
& Go. — Lola Wentworth — Harry Holman A Co. — 
The Clown Seal— Bell Prultt — MeLallen & Canon. 

Biraralae — Olga Mlsbka — Aveliog & Lloyd — Wal- 
ter Brower — Maryland Singers—Cross & Josephine 
— Dlgby Bell & Co. — Harry Carroll — Conroy A 
I.e Malre. 

fioyal — Laurie A Brooson — Al Herman — Arenas 
& Lloyd— Bradley ft Ardlne — Abbott ft White. 
BROOKLYN. 

Buahwick — Kaufman Bros. 

Henderson— Burley ft Barley — Bice ft Werner — 
Tempest Ac Sunshine — Consul — Violet Dale — Gar- 
cennlttl Bros. 

Saw Brighton— Rockwell ft Wood— Bert Baker 
& Co.— Nan Halperln — Liner's Classic Dancer*— 
••Rubevllle"— Henry Lewis — Van ft Bell— Brennan 
& Powell — Cntnko ft Kaufman. 

BOSTON, stASS. 

Keith's — Irwin ft Henry— P. & L. Brnch — Dor- 
othy Toye — Bert Johnson — The Volunteers — The 
Gladiators — Lydell ft Higgles — Julia Artnur — Poor 

Boycea- 

BUFFALO, S. Y. 

Shea's F. * A. Astair — Guerin & Newell— 

Ferry. 

detboit, mcH. 

Temple — Nat Nazarro— Herr Jensen— Ettner, 
Kawksley ft McKay— Kenny ft Nobody. 
GRAND B APIDS. KICK. 
Electric Park — Corbett, Shepherd & Donovan — 
Gould & Lewla— Selma Braatz — Meredith ft 
Snoosjer. 

NORFOLK, VA. 
Academy (First Half)— Savoy ft Brennan— -'Girl 
With Thousand Eyea" — Moaner, Hayes ft Mosber. 
(Last Half)— Hana Hanke — Cooper ft Blcardo. 
PrnT.ADKT.PHTA, FA. 
Keith's — Poniello Sisters — Gene Greene — Chas. 
T. Aldrlch — Ward ft Van — Williams ft Wolfus — 
Clark's Hawaiian* — McClure & Dolly — Arthur 
Havel ft Co. 

RICHJfOzTD, VA. 

Keith's— (First Half)— Hana Hanke — Cooper ft 
Blcardo. (Last Half)— Savoy ft Brennan — Mosber, 
Hayes «e Masher. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Keith's— Howard ft Clark Review — PIstel ft 
Cusblnc— Dabl & Otllea — Will Oakland — Skipper 
ft Kastrup — Lola Wentwortb — Arnaut Bros. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO. 
Majestic— Els & French — Jas. C. Morton ft Co. — 
Halllgan & Sykes — Libooatl — Leak Nora — Robert 
De Mont Trio — Montambo ft Wells — King & King 
—Eddie Rosa — Carl Bandall ft Ernestine Meyers. 
LOUISVILLE. KY. 
Fontaine Ferry Park — H. ft A. Seymour — Bay- 
mood ft O'Connor — The Berrena — Wilson ft Aub- 
rey — Carl Blfner. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Orpheum — Bay Cox — Dorothy Shoemaker ft Co. — 
Nat Goodwin — Ollvattl. Moffet ft Clare — Marlon 
Harris — De Leon A Davles — Boyle ft Brown — 
Mlllicent Mower. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Forest Park Highlands — Jas. Thompson ft Co. — 
Adair & Adelphl — Calta Bros. — Ethel McDonough — 
Carson Bros. 

BAN FRANCI8C0. CAL. 

Orpheum— Jessie Busley ft Co. — Clifford ft Wills 
—Vera Berliner — Norton ft Nicholson — Milton ft 
De Long Sisters— Callste Conant — Evelyn Nesult — 
Bay Snow. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

XEW YORK CITY. 

American (First Half)— Max Lolbe— O'Neill 
Twins — Martini ft Maximilian — Homer ft Dubard — 
Anthony Andre A Co.- — Pepplno* ft Perry — Jackson 
ft Wahl — Frank Bush. (Last Hall) — Moore. 
White ft BUss— The Randalls— Jimmy Shea— "Mr. 
Chaser" — Dougherty ft Lucy — Harry English ft Co. 

Boulevard (First Half)— The Frltches — Beth 
Mayo — Bayno ft Hoyt — Bans Roberts ft Co — Melody 
Foot. (Last Half) — Marshall ft Covert — Payne ft 
Xesblt — Bernlvlcl Bros. — Senator Murphy. 

Avenue B (First Half) — Forest ft Church — Burns 
A Lynn— Chas. Rettly. (Last Half)— Dellte, Stew- 
art a Hardy— Mabel Beet— Rice ft Francis — Three 
Resale. 

Greeley Square (First Half) — Denni ft Petri — 
Jewett ft Pendleton — Dore's Beanx A Belles — 
Brady ft Mahoney — Ham Tree Mole. (Last Half) 
—Pepplno ft Perry — Marlon ft Willard — Spiegel ft 
Jones — Congressman Kitty — Richard Wally. 

Delaacey Street (First Half) — Stewart ft Olive — 
Hazel Bayne; Mills ft Loekwood — Congressman 
Kitty — Bert ft Paoll — The Randalls. (Last Half) 
—Marshall ft Welton — O'Neill Twins — Dinklns, 
Barr ft Everett — Sampson ft Douglas— Jan Bnblni 
— Ward ft Cnrran — Betty Mayo — Martians. 

Lincoln Square (First Half— The Valdos — 
Doughterty ft Lueey — Spiegel ft Jones — Harry 
Brooks ft Co. — Senator Murphy — Kate ft Wiley. 
(Last Half) — Ham Tree Male — Stewart ft Olive — 
Deonl ft Perrl — Dore's Beaux ft Belles — Andy 
Lewis A Co. 

National (First Half)— La Tay's Models— Helen 
Vincent— Marion ft Willard— Valentine Vox— Andy 
Lewis A Co. (Last Half — Noack — Billy ft Ada 
White— Vslayds ft Nuts— Harry Gibbs ft Co.— 
Bosh A Shapiro. 

Orpheum (First Half) — Richard Wally — Billy ft 
Ada White — Dinklns, Barr ft Everett— Granville 
* Mack— Betting Bettys. (Last Half)— FraieT. 
Brlce & Hardy — Roatino ft Shelley— Jackson ft 

Wahl — Harry Brooks A Co. — Frank Bush. 

Seventh Avenue (First Half)— Three Tirol! Girls 
— Moore, White ft Bliss — Baseball Four — Lew 
Cooper ft Co. (Last Half)— Helen Vincent — Bert 
A Paoll— Betting Bettys — Melody Four. 

BROOXXYxT. 

Bijou (First Half) — Roberts — Praxer, Bunee ft 
Hardy— Van ft Carrie Avery — Sampson ft Dooglas 



WiUBE¥3LMM 




—Bernlvlcl Bros. (Last Half)— Msx Loune— Three 
TivoU Girls — Mills A Loekwood: Anthony Andre A 
Co. — Lew Cooper ft Co.— Kate ft Wiley. 

DeSalb (First Half)— Noack— Valayda ft Nuts- 
Harry Gibbs ft Co. — Bush ft Shapiro — Winifred. 
GUfraln ft Co. (Last Half)— La Tsy's Models — 
Hazel Bayne — Granville ft Mack— Hans Roberts 
ft Co. — Howard ft Sadler — Martini ft Maxmllllan. 

Warwick (First Hair) — Cornelia ft Adele— Rice 
ft Francis — Howard & Msck — Fujlama Japs. (Last 
Half) — Valdos — McSbayne A Hathaway. 

Fulton (First Half )— Marshall ft Covert— Roatino 
ft Shelley — Harry English ft Co. — Howard ft Sad- 
ler — Martians. (Last Half) — Dancing Demons — 
Homer ft Du Bard— Valentine Vax — Belle Rutland 
— Winifred Gllfraln ft Co. 

Palace (First Half) — La Belle Carmen Trio — 
McSbayne ft Hathaway — Ward ft Cnrren. (Last 
Half) — Forrest ft Churcb — Howard ft Mack— "The 
Scoop" — Chas. Rellly. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Hippodrome — Kenney ft La France — Harmon ft 
Malcolm — Grace De Winters — Lew Welch A Co. — 
Jen McWllllams — Six Serensders. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Orpheum (First Half) — Orban A Dixie — Ctias. 
Deland ft Co. — Cunningham ft Bennett — Gypsy 
Sonxsters — Smith ft Kaufman. (Last Hslf) — Nor- 
ton ft Noble — "The Alibi"— Baker ft Rogers — 
Lambert! — Elks Trio — Harms Trio. 

St. James (First Hslf)— Rob ft Robertson— Old 
Homestead Four — Tom ft Stasis Moore — Nolan A 
Nolan. (Last Half)— Manning Sisters — Chas. C. 
Rice ft Co. — Fox ft Cross. 

FALL RIVER. MASS. 

Bijou (First Hslf)— Norton A Noble— Baker ft 
Rogers — "The Alibi" — Elks Trio— Harms Trio. 
(Last Hslf) — Orben ft Dixie— Cunningham ft Ben- 
nett — Chas. Deland ft Co. — Smith ft Kaufman — 
Gypsy Songsters. 

HEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. 

Loew's (First Half)— Three Regain— Mabel Best 
— "The Scoop". (Last Half)— Burns ft Lynn — 
Knowles ft White — Bert Howard. 

PROVIDENCE. R. I. 

Emery (First Half) — Joe A Jessie Burus — Plottl 
— B. E. Cllve ft Co.— Lltte Cams ft Co. (Last 
Half) — Artome — Ward ft Barton— Kennedy ft 
Rooney — Kate Pullman. 

Majestic (First Half) — Manning Sisters — Chas. 
C. Bice ft Co. — Fox ft Cross — "Mr. Chaser". (Last 
Half) — Bob ft Robertson — Old Homestead Four — 
Tom ft Stasia Moore — Nolan & Nolan. 
SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 

Plasa (First Half)— Artome — Ward ft Barton — 
Kennedy * Rooney — Kate Pullman. (Last Half) — 
Joe ft Jlmmle Burns — Plottl — E. E. Cllve ft Co. 
TORONTO. CAM. 

Yongs Street— Nora ft Sidney Kellogg— Thomas 
ft Henderson — Keene ft Williams — BUly Olason— 
"Shot at Sunrise"— Wllla Holt Wakefield— Chyo ft 
Chyo. 

POU CIRCUIT 
BRIDGEPORT CONN. 

Poll (First Halt) — O'DonncU ft Blalt— Butzell 
A Little — Porter J. White A Co. — Morton A Rus- 
sell— Dresm Fantasies. (Last Hslf)— Lilette — 
Elklns, Fsy ft Elklns — "Memories"— Klmberly ft 
Arnold — Four Newsomes. 

HARTFORD. CONN. 

Poll (First Half)— Four Husbands. (Last Half) 
— Musical Britons — La Van A Devtne— Five Met- 
xettis. 

Palace (First Half)— Fred Corelll ft Co. — 
"Memories" — Leo Beers. (Last Half) — O'Donnell 
A Blair — Morton A Russell — Harry Gerard A Co. 
NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Bijou (First Half)— Llllette— Elklns. Fsy ft 
Elklns — Allen A Francis — "Storyland." (Last 
Half)— The Sheldons— Buxzell ft Little — Porter J. 
White ft Co. — Emma Stephens. 

WATERBTTRY, CONN. 

Poll (First Half)— Musical Britons— Klmberly ft 
Arnold — Al Shayne — Four Newsomes. (Last 

Half) — Four Husbands. 

Plaza (First Half)— La Van ft Devlne — Five 
Metzettls. (Lsst Half) — Allen ft Francis— Leo 
Beers. 

INTERSTATE CIRCUIT 

JOPLXhT, MO. 
Electric (First Half) — Pete. A Charles — Cooper 
Sisters. (Last Half)— Christy ft Grlffln— Flying 
Howards. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Electric (First Half) — Christy A Grlffln — Flying 
Howards. (Last Half)— Flo Adler ft Co.— Delton, 

IMmi^Ana A DeltOU. 

Globe (First Half)— Milton Frankel— Fred ft 
Aleen Vance — Six Southern Serensders — Solllvan ft 
Myers— Herberts ft Dare. (Lsst Half)— Miss Le 
Vain ft Co.— Dnmals ft Floyd— Nagle ft Grey — 
Akl Trio. 

LITTLE SOCK. ARK. 
Majestic (First Halfl— Franz ft La Salle- 
Scott ft Tlerney. (Last Hslf)— Degnon ft Clifton. 
sai/ssPirTn TENxT. 

Orpheum (First Half) — "Girl from Milwaukee" 
— Brosiua ft Brown — Three Keltons. (Last Hslf) 
— Prank La Salle — Scott ft Tlerney. 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OXLA. 
Lyric (First Half) — Mendle. Caesar A Grey — 
Prevett A Merrill— Vincent ft Carter— Harvey Trio. 
(Last Half) — Belle Barous ft Co. — May ft KUduff 

Casting Campbells — Kelff ft Murray. 

ST. JOSEPH, MO. 
Electric (First Half)— Flo Adler ft Co.— Delton. 
Mareena ft Delton. (Last Half) — Taylor ft Brown 
— The Le Fevres. 



BPRINGFLELD. OHIO. 

Electric (First Half I — Wlliison ft Sherwood— 
Aki Trio. (Last Half)— Pete ft Cbsrlcs— Cooper 
sisters. 

TULSA, OKLA. 

Empress (First Half)— Orbassny's Birds— Relff 
ft Murray — Belle Barous ft Co.— May ft Kllduff — 
Casting Campbells. (Last Half)— Milton Frankel 
— Fred A Alleen Vance — Six Southern Serensders — 
Sullivan ft Myers — Herberta ft Dare. 

W. V. M. A. 

BUTTE, MONT. 

Empress (First Half)— Arnold ft Psge— Gruet. 
Kramer A Gruet — Rodway A Edwards — Fremont 
Benton ft Co.— Charles ft Madeline Dunbar— Fly- 
ing Venus. (Last Half)— Harry Watklus— Gerald 
ft Grlffln — Fields. Keane ft Walsh— "Echoes of 
Broadway" — Permane — Don Robert A Company. 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Babcook (June 21)— William De Hollis ft Co. 

Sherwood ft Sberwood— Melville A Mllue — Ned 
Nestor's Sweethearts — Henry Rudolph— Ed ft Lot- 
He Ford. (June 24-25)— Curtis' Comedy Canines- 
Nelson A Eagle — Jessie A Dolly Miller — Alice Nel- 
so-. A Co.— Bessie La Count— Willie Bros. 
DDXUTH, MINN. 

New Grand (First Hslf)— The Oluisteada— June 
Mills ft Co.— Lillian Steele Trio. (Last Half) — 
Joe Bolley — Violin Beauties— Catalano ft O'Brien 
— Marriott Troupe. 

EAST ST. LOUIS. MO. 
Erbar's (First Half)— Wolgast A Girlie— Kirk A 
Maddox— Lewis ft Leopold— Valentine A Belle. 

(Laat Half)— Harry Dixon— Walters ft Kantor 

Fields & Wells — Ishskawa Bros. 

FORT WILLIAM, CAM. 
Orpheum (June 18-19) — Kane A Wsgner — Hut. 
Marlon— Cosmopolitan Trio — Sebastian Merrill ft 
Co. 



GREAT FALLS, MONT. 

Pslaoo (June 21)— Kartelll— The McFarlanda— 
Story ft Clark— Arthur La Vine ft Co.— Daisy liar- 
court — Roeders' Inventions. (June 23-94) — William 
De Hollis ft Co. — Sberwood ft Sherwood— Melville 
ft Milne — Ned Nestor's Sweetbesrls --Henry ft 
Rudolptl — Ed A Lottie Ford. 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

M inch m.tsj M inch 

S inch lJ-ss) M inch 

M bach ltHiS) inch Zl.es 

42 inch SXLSS 

WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

145 W. 45th St.. N.Y. 4 W. 22d St., N.Y. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 
Mail Order. Filled Sana* Day Racatvad 

fS Deposit Required 



WANTED Summer and Regular Season 

GLADYS KLARK COMPANY 

Dramatic People, all lines. Presenting; such plays as "COMMON CLAY," "LITTLE PEGGY 
O'MOORE." etc State all with photo . Rehearsals, week of July 30th. Address J. E. BAL- 
FOUR, Socnerswortb, N. H. 



Wanted for Jack Lynn Stock Co. 

Under canvass, GENERAL BUSINESS MAN, who can play some heavies. 
Must have good study and wardrobe. State lowest summer salary; age etc., 
first letter. Photos returned promptly. Address JACK LYNN, Oxford, N. Y. 



THE 3 ORIGINAL REGALS 



In "THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH SHOP.' 



Direction, LOU EDELMAN 



Need Photos Quickly? 



Telephone 
Connection 

3 Professicmal S a 7 Photographs Finished in 24 Hours for fl.as). Duplicates can be had as 
needed. Quality guaranteed. Large studio. Bring costumes. CAREY ART STUDIO, INC, 
552 7th Ave., New York, at Met. Opera House. 



ALAMAC THEATRICAL HOTEL 

Formerly ths) New Rageat 
JOS. T. WEISMAN, Propriotor. 

Northwest Corner 14th & Chestnut Sts., St, Louis, Mo. 

Theatrical Hostelry, Cafe and Cabaret 
Union Help (Member N. V. A. and Burlesque Club) Beat Bet on the Circuit 



WANTED— Now Booking 

High-Class Vaudeville Acts 

Feature Acts — Novelties — Only the Best Wanted. 
Will Play Vaudeville Starting Week July 9th. 

MANAGERaS— NOTE 

Have Open Time — Weeks July 9, 16, 23 and 30 — for The 
Billy Allen Musical Comedy Co. 

35 People — All Special Scenery — Playing Royalty Productions — 
Great Show — Managers, Book this Show, it will get you the 
business. Write or wire. 

HARRY A. HAWN, Lakeside Park Casino, Akron, Ohio 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



AT B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE, THIS WEEK, JUNE 1 1 



FLORENZ 



MARION 



TEMPEST and SUNSHINE 

In "A BROADWAY BOUQUET" 

Desire to thank the members of the United Booking Offices and the Orpheum Circuit for the many kindnesses and cour- 
tesies received the past season. 

AT HENDERSON'S MUSIC HALL, NEXT WEEK, JUNE 18 



THE NATION IS CALLING FOR 





THE SONG ALL AMERICA HAS BEEN WAITING FOR! 
THE GREATEST PATRIOTIC SONG HIT IN A HUNDRED YEARS! 

Professional Copy, 10c. Song Orchestration, 15c. 



C. L. BARNHOUSE 



Oskaloosa, Iowa 



ELECTRICITY GENERATED WITHOUT THE AID OF A BATTERY 

LAURA HOUSTON 

The lire-wire sonbrette sizzling successfully and upon exhibition at the Olympic Theatre in my second big week of stock, roehm'a'r/chards 



Wanted— Experienced Chorus Girls 

Good Singers and Dancers. Salary $20. Railroad fares to opening and from 

closing points, and No Wardrobe. 

Address MAURICE JACOBS, Room 412, 1547 Broadway, New York 



GEO. F. BELFRAGE WANK F0R AN0THER ■■ SH0W 



AMERICAN CIRCUIT 



BURLESQUE PEOPLE— ALL LINES 



THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 

Suite 704 COLUMBIA THEATRE BLDG., N. Y. C 



Need some good chorus girls that can 
appreciate good treatment and salary 



KLINE & WOOD 

SCENIC STUDIO 

408 GATES AVENUE, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Wanted for Next Season 

Chora. Ladte. for 
THE BEEF TRUST 

Alio Small Girl, for the 

UNITED STATES BEAUTIES 

Alio want good feature acts, and people l» ell 
Ones of Burlexjae. Addreaa BTT.T.T WATSON. 
(hphaaca Tbeatn, Patanon. H. J. 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 





Routes Must Reach This Office Not Later 
Than Saturday 

Iiarrie's, J. M„ Players (Chag. Frobman, Inc., 
mgr.) — Empire, New York, lndef. 

-Brat, The" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — Moros- 
co.. New York, lndef. 

Collier. Wm. (H. H. Fr&zee. mgr.) — Lone- 
acre. New York, lndef. 

Cowl, Jane (Selwyn & Co., mgrs.) — Harris, 
New York, lndef. 

Clarke, Harry Corson and Margaret Dale 
Owen — Calcutta, India, lndef. 

•Canary Cottage" (Oliver Morosco. mgr.) — 
Lyric, Phlla.. 11-indef. 

•Dew Drop Inn" — Milwaukee, 11-10. 

•Pair and Warmer" (Selwyn * Co.. nigra.) — 

Park Sq., Boston, lndef. 
•Her Soldier Boy" (The Shoberts, mgr.) — 

Shubert, New York ' lndef. 
"His Little Widows'* (G. M. Anderson & 

Lawrence WeBer, mgrs.) — Astor, New York, 

lndef. 
"His Brldnl Night," with Dolly Sisters (A. 

H. Woods, mgr.) — Wilbur, Boston, lndef. 
"Knife, The'' — Bijou, New York, lndef. 
•Love o' Mike" (Elizabeth. Marbury, mgr.) — 

Marine Elliott's, New York, lndef. 

"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 
mgr.) — Playhouse, New York, lndef. 

"Mary's Ankle" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — Wil- 
bur, Boston, lndef. 

•'Oh Boy" — Princess, New York, lndef. 

"Pals First" (J. Fred Zimmerman, mgr.) — 
Fulton, New York, lndef. 

"Passing Show of 1917" — Winter Garden, 
New York, lndef. 

"Peter Ibbetson" (Lee Shubert, mgr.) — Re- 
public, New York, 11-16. 

"Pawn, The " — Princess, Chicago, lndef. 

"Smarter Set" (C. I* Convell, mgr.) — Balti- 
more, Md., 11-18 ; Lafayette, New York, 
18-23. 

"Seven Chances" JJJavld Belasco, mgr.) — 
Cort, Chicago, lndef: . 

"The 13th Chair" — Forty-eighth Street, New 
York, lndef. 

•Turn to the Bight" (Smith & Golden, mgrs.) 
— Gaiety, New York, lndef. 

"Turn to the Bight" (Smith & Golden, mgrs.) 
— Grand, Chicago, lndef. 

"Treasure Island' r (Chas. Hopkins, mgr.)— 
Hollls Boston, lndef. 
Tailor-Made Man" (Cohan & Harris, mgrs.) 
— Tremont, Boston, lndef. 

"Upstairs and Down" (Oliver Morosco. mgr.) 
— Cort, New York, lndef. 

"Very Good Eddie" (Marbury, Comstock Co., 
mgrs.) — Gar rick, Chicago, lndef. 

Washington Sq. Players — Comedy, New York, 
lndef. 

"When Johnny Comes Marching Home" (F. 
C. Whitney, mgr.) — Manhattan, New York, 
lndef. 

"You're In Love" (Arthur Hammersteln, 
mgr.) — Casino, New York, lndef. 
STOCK 

Auditorium Players — Maiden, Mass., lndef. 

Alcazar Players — San Francisco, lndef. 

Albee Stock (Chas. Lovenberg, mgr.) — 
Providence, H. I., lndef. 

Angell Stock (Joe AngelL mgr.) — Park, Pitts- 
burgh, lndef. 

Arlington Stock— McCook, Neh., 11-16. 

Bennett, Richard, Stock — San Francisco, ln- 
def. 

Bryant. Marguerite, Players — .Altoona, Pa., 

Brown,' Clark, Stock — Montreal. Can., lndef. 
Brown. Clark, Stock — Hamilton. Can., lndef. 
Bishop Players — Oakland, CaL, lndef. 
Bonstelle, Jessie, Stock — Detroit lndef. 
Boyer, Nancy, Stock— Kalamazoo, Mich., in- 

**- ~ 

Cornell-Price Players — Wanseon, O., lndef. 

Columbia Stock — Lewis, DeL, 11-16; Mllford, 
18-23. 

Dale, Kathryn, Stock — Omaha, Neb., lndef. 

Desmond, Mae Co. (Ed. Cuddy, mgr.) — 
Schenectady, N. Y., lndef. 

DfJnty, Bessie. Players (I. E. Earle, mgr.) — 
Dallas, Tex., lndef. 

Denham Players — Denver, lndef. 

Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.) — Sharps 
burg. Pa., lndef. 

Emerson Players — Lowell, Maes., lndef. 

Garden Theatre, Stock— Kansas City, Mo., 
lndef. 

Glaser, Vaughan, Stock — Alvin, Pittsburgh, 
indef. 

Gordlnler Bros., Stock — Ft. Dodge, la., lndef. 

Home, Col. F. P„ Stock— Akron, O., lndef. 

Jewett, Henry. Players — Copley, Boston, ln- 
def. 

Keith's Hudson Theatre, Stock — Union Hill, 
N. J., lndef. 

Keith Stock — Portland, Me., lndef. 

Knickerbocker Players — Syracuse, N. Y., ln- 
def. 

Lawrence, DeL, Stock — San Francisco, indef. 

Lyric Theatre Stock — Bridgeport, Conn., In- 

arf - ^ . 

Lyric Light Opera Oo. — Providence, B. I* 
indef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, lndef. 

Manhattan Players — Bochester, N. Y., lndef. 

McWattera & Webb Stock — Saginaw, Mich., 
indef. 

New Strand Stock — Mobile, Ala., lndef. 

Opera Players — Hartford, Conn., lndef. 

Orpheum Players (Geo. Ebey, mgr.) — Oak- 
land, Cal., lndef. _ _ 

Oliver, Otis, Playera (Harry J. Wallace, 

_ mgr.) — Lincoln, Neb., lndef. 

Oliver, Otis, Players — Richmond, Ind., lndef. 

Poll Players — Poll's, Washington, lndef. 

Poll Players — Worcester. Mass., lndef. 

Packard, Jay. Stock — Newark. N. J„ lndef. 

Price, Stanley, Players — Grand Rapids, 
Mich., lndef. 

Robins, Edward, Stock — Toronto, Can., lndef. 



Shubert Stock — Milwaukee, lndef. 

Shubert Stock— St. Paul, Minn. 

SomervlIIe Theatre Players — Somervllle. 
Mass.. lndef. 

St. Clair, Winifred, Stock (Earl Slpe, mgr.) 
— Trenton. N. J„ lndef. 

Toler, Sydney, Stock— Portland, Me., lndef. 

Van Dyke & Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 
Joplin, Mo., lndef. 

Vees, Albert. Stock — Wheeling, W. Va., lndef. 

Wilkes Musical Stock — Vancouver, Can., ln- 
def. 

WadBworth Dram. Stock (Edward Ornsteln. 
mgr.) — Toledo, O., lndef. 

Williams, Ed., Stock— Elkhart, Ind., lndef. 

Williams. Ed., Stock — Qulncy, I1L, lndef. 

Woods, Lew, Stock — Syracuse, N. Y.. lndef. 

Walker, Stuart, Players — Indianapolis, lndef. 

Wilkes Players — Seattle, Wash., 10-lndef. 

COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS 
Permanent and Traveling 

Gramllck's, Chas., Follies of the Dav — Moose 

Jaw, Can., lndef. 
Lord & Vernon Mns. Com. Co. — Muskogee, 

Okla.. 11-16. 
McLeod's Birds of Paradise (Ray Adair, mgr.) 

— Steubenville. O.. lndef. 
McLeod's Isle of Roses (Arthur McLeod. 

mgr.) — Yoongstown, 0., Indef. 
Reldway & Burton M. C. Co. — Minor, N. D.. 

indef. 
Shaffer's Boys and Girls — Dennlson, Tex.. 

10-16. 
Tabarin Girls (Dave Newman, mgr.) — Mc- 

Keesport, Pa., 11-13: Greenville, 14-16. 
Walker's Music Bugs (Ed. M. Moore, mgr.) — 

Meadvllle, Pa., 11-16: OH City, 18-23. 
Zarrow's American Girl Co. — ChllUcothe, O.. 

J 1-16. 
Zarrow's Little Bluebird Co. (Jack Foquay, 

mgr.) — Corning, N. Y„ 11-16. 
Zarrow's Variety Review (D. J. Lvncb, mgr.) 

— Washington, Pa, 11-16. 

CARNIVALS 

Brown's International Shows — Van Buren, 

Ark., 11-16. 
Benson & Berger Shows — West Orange, N. J., 

11-16. 
Bernard! Greater Shows — Sioux Falls, S. D., 

11-16. 
Clifton-Kelly Shows — Westvllle, III., 11-16. 
Campbell Snows — Decatur, 111.. 18-23. 
Eastern Amuse. Co. — Bath, Me.. 11-16. 
Ferarl, Col. Francis, Shows — Masslllon, O., 

11-16. 
Great Excelsior Shows — Mount Union, Pa„ 

11-10. 
Great American Shows — Albion, Mich., 11-16. 
Great Cosmopolitan Shows — W. Terre Haute, 

Ind., 11-16. 
Hoss- Lorman Shows — Wellsbnrg, W. Va.. 

11-16. 
Jones, Johnny J., Show — Altoona, Pa., 11-16. 
Metropolitan Shows — Berkeley, Va.. 11-16. 
Rutherford Greater Shows — Columbus, O.. 11- 

16. 
Reynolds, George, Shows — Greenfield, O., 11- 

16. 
Savldge, Walter, Amuse. Co. — Alnsworth, 

Neb.. 11-16. 
Washburn's, Leon, Mighty Midway Shows — 

W. Hoboken, N. J., 11-16: Bayonne. 18-23. 
World at Home Shows — Butte, Mont., 11-16 ; 

Helena, 18-23. 
Zeldman * Pollle Shows — Kenosha, Wis., 11- 

CIRCUSES 

Barnes. Al. G. — Moscow, Idaho. 13 : Palouse. 

Wash., 14 ; LewlBton, Idaho, 15 : Dayton, 

Wash., 16; Sunnyslde, 18; No. Yakima, 

10 ; EUensburjr, 20 ; Toppenlsh, 21 ; Kenne- 

wlcfc, 22 ; Walla Walla. 23. 
Cole Bros. — Harlowton, Mont., 13; Lewtston. 

14 ; Singling, 15 ; Boxeman, 16. 
Cook Bros. — Cannonsburg, Pa.. 13 ; McDonald, 

14; Cadiz. O.. 15. 
La Tena's— Hillsdale, Mich.. 13 ; Eaton 

Rapids, 14 ; Owosso. 15 : Midland, 16. 
Rlngllne Bros. — Lowell, Mass., 13 ; Lawrence. 

14; Manchester, N. H., 16; Fltchburg. 

Mass., 16. 
Sells-Floto — Streator, 111.. 13 ; Aurora, 14 ; 

Evanston. 15; Elgin, 16. 

BANDS AND ORCHESTRAS 

Pryor, Arthur — Willow Grove Park, Pblla.. 
lndef- 

T.nker's Singing Orchestra— W. Enfield, Me., 
18; Dexter, 14; Newport,- 15; Auburn, 16; 
Wilton. 18: Dixiefleld. 19; Norway, 20; 
Saco, 21 ; Brldgton, 22 ; Auburn, 23. 
MISCELLANEOUS 

Adams, James, Floating Theatre — Kilmar- 
nock, Va., 10-16: Onancock, 18-23. 

Ripley's Picture * Vaude. Show — Demster, 
N. Y- 11-16. _ _. 

Saunders Amuse. Co. (Sherman H. wicks. 
mg r.) — Patchogue, N. Y., 13: Port Jeffer- 
son, 14 ; Shelter Island, 15 ; Greenpolnt, 
16. 

FROHMAN CO. WINS NEW TRIAL 

The Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court last week ordered a reversal of the 
lower court's opinion, which dismissed the 
suit of the Frohman Amusement Corpo- 
ration against Albert Blinkhorn, the Lon- 
don motion picture dealer, and declared 
for a new trial. Blinkhorn is charged 

■-with failure to account for $2,547, which, it 
is alleged, is the balance remaining from 
the sale of the foreign rights to "John 

. Gladye'a Honor" and another picture. 



GET OVER 

With The Help Of The Best Songs! 



You want the kind of song that helps put ITSELF over. 
Bear that in mind when selecting numbers for your own use. 
Here are some selected for their hit-making qualities. Get 
YOUR copies today! 

"LILY OF THE VALLEY" 

Gilbert &. Friedland'* smashing "nut" song sensation. Suc- 
cessfully featured by Adele Rowland, Sophie Tucker, Henry 
Lewis and a host of others. You must know it. Are you 
doing it? 

MY SWEET EGYPTIAN ROSE 



ii 



ii 



The beautiful successor to "Persian Rose" by the same writ- 
ers, Edgar Allen Woolf and Anatol Friedland. One of the 
most appealing ballads ever offered you. 

"IT TAKES A LONG. TALL, BROWNSKIN GAL 

TO MAKE A PREACHER LAY HIS BIBLE DOWN" 
Will E. Skidmore's applause compelling riot The greatest 
of all coon shout songs. Great for any blackface — and some 
whiteface — acts. 

"SHIM-ME-SHA-WABBLE" 

The new Western sensation. A worthy successor to "Ballin' 
the Jack" and the only number that can claim that distinc- 
tion. You need it! 

"LOVE IS A WONDERFUL THING" 

The laugh-getting love song by Gilbert & Friedland, so suc- 
cessfully used by Adele Rowland, Henry Lewis and other 
noted artists. 

"PRINCESS OF THE WILLOW TREE" 

The new Japanese song by Harris and Morgan. There has 
never been a song of this type that can equal our little 
Princess in sheer beauty and charm. 

"SING ME THE MELODY OF LOVE" 

A most charming ballad by Harry Kerr and Will Skidmore. 
A song delight that goes over with little effort. 

"HESITATION BLUES" 

That different "blues" by Scott Myddleton and Billy Smy the. 
Once you start on it, you can't get away from it! 

"THEM DOCCON'D TRIFLIN' BLUES" 

A genuine knock-out among "blues" songs. Don't forget 
to get it! 



JOS. W. STERN & CO 

L. WOLFE GILBERT, Prof. Mgr. 1 
1556 Broadway, New York 

CHICAGO OFFICE— 1 19 No. Clark St. 

FRISCO— E. S.FIorintine, 111 Kearny St 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



GEORGE M. COHAN'S MASTER PATRIOTIC SONG 




NORA B AYES introduced it and made it the talk of New York. 

A Sensation in THE GUS EDWARDS REVUE at Henderson's Coney Island. 

A riot for HARRY ELLIS at the Winter Garden. 

LITTLE BILLY made the Hippodrome rock with it at the N. V. A. benefit. 

— A tune that will put "pep" in the step of our Yankee soldier boys. 

A clean up for Arthur Lipson. 



WM. JEROME PUBLISHING CORP. STRAND ^ at v r o e R k bu,ld,ng 



Publishers of "IF I CATCH THE GUY WHO WROTE POOR BUTTERFLY," "SOMETIME," 
"MISSISSIPPI" and "COTTON PICKIN' TIME IN ALABAM'" 



THE OVERNIGHT SENSATION OF SONGDOM 

I'm NotGoingTo Buy Any Summer Clothes" 

i BY HARRY PEASE AND| GILBERT DODGE 
A; NOVELTY SUMMER SONG WITH A SURPRISING PUNCH 



VOCAL ORCHESTRATIONS IN ALL KEYS 



ALSO QANO AND DANCE 



PUBLISHED 
BY 



BERNARD GRANVILLE PUB. CO.. Inc. 



145 W. 45th St. 

NEW YORK 









ARTHUR HIGSON 

A Dancer of Merit Who Always Upholds His Reputation 
NOW FEATURED, WINTER GARDEN SHOW.' CHICAGO 




M U S I C HOSPIT A L 1 

We kind and repnir sheet mii'sic.'partit nnd books, so tKat the leaves open flat ana 1 
will net pull our or prrt lost. I 

Sl'tdAL/i Y Hinged covers' foi orr.hrstrsiion.i.' . " Call or write for free sample. 1 

UTSJIOIV HINGE BINDINGCO.I 

120 West 42r.d Si. Trl Bryant 535". New York City 1 


SIGNED WITH MISCHIEF MAKERS 

SEASON 1917-1918 

JOHN CROSBY 

"ANGY" THE WOP 


Grace Manning 

HI-LO-SONGBIRD OF VAUDEVILLE 


SAUNDERS & CAMERON 

In Their New Variety Act — In Vaudeville 


SHEEDY and HOLT 

Refined Singiaa;, Dancing and Impersonations 


TUIT nC'Y IDDITD Three Months 
I * tlHi V^Ll" r^tilv one Dollar 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



DIXIE SUIT REVERSED 

Judgment has been reversed in the case 
of Henry E. Dixie against the Punch and 
Judy Theatre, the Appellate Term of the 
Supreme Court holding that Dixie was 
bound by an oral contract to exploit no 
publicity on his own account while in the 
"Treasure Island" production. Dixie sued 
to recover $350, which he alleged was due 
him as salary. The upper court dismissed 
the complaint. Alfred 6. Steiner, asso- 
ciated with O'Brien, Malevinsky and Dris- 
coll, appeared for Dixie, and Ditenhoefer 
and Fisher represented the Punch and 
Judy interests. 



BOAT CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS 

Fats Hater, N. J., June 10. — The an- 
nual meeting and election of officers of the 
Players' Boat Club was held last night 
The following were elected: Tony Hunt- 
ington, president ; Ralph Bockaway, vice- 
president ; Robert Hunting, secretary; 
Fred Rider, treasurer. The trustees 
chosen were Frank Worth, Frank Herbert, 
D. McAllister, Frank Otto and Frank 
Wesson. 

Following the meeting a vaudeville show 
was given in which Ernie Otto, Johnny 
Webber, Ralph Rockaway and Annie Hart 
appeared. Dancing followed the show. 



TO INCORPORATE ALLIANCE 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Actors' Church Alliance was held last 
Thursday evening at the headquarters, in 
Ascension Memorial Church. A large 
gathering was present and Frederick 
Warde presided. Plans to incorporate the 
Alliance were adopted, and the following 
were appointed directors for the first year : 
George Arliss, Frederick Warde, Rev. 
Walter E. Bentley, Kate Claxton, William 
Trevor. Walston B. Southwick, Josiah C. 
Pnmpelly, Millie Thorne and I. Newton 
Williams and Maggie Breyer. 



SELWYN SIGNS BLANCH YURKA 

Blanche Yurka has left Frank Keenan's 
company, which is presenting "The Pawn." 
in Chicago, to assume a role in Selwyn & 
Company's production of "Daybreak," writ- 
ten by Jane Cowl and Jane Muffin. . „• 



HIP IS CENSUS BUREAU 

The State Military Census Board is 
utilizing the lobby of the Hippodrome 'as 
a census station for the period of State 
registration. C. E. Whitmore, "in charge 
of the 27th District, is using the foyer of 
the theatre as bis headquarters. 



F 

O 
O 

T 


TIOHTir UNION SUm> 

SYMMETRICAL* 
AND THEATRICAL SUPPUES 

Writs Im Cit>!cf» Na. 4 


T 

I 

G 


L 
1 

T 
E 


WALTER G.BRETZFIELDCO.. 

INC. 

1367 BROADWAY. N. Y. 

Cor. 37th St. 


H 

T 
S 



WANTED QUICK 

Good Med. Sketch Team and Lady Piano Player. 
Vaudeville people all lines write. RIPLEY'S PIC- 
TURE AND VAUDEVILLE, Now Woodstook, N. T. 

LADY DRESSER 

Desires Position as Dresser (white). Vaude- 
ville or Dramatic. Reliable and Permanent. 
Lose no time. Address I— D., care Dipper 
Office, 210 Crilly Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

AiDA 
LAWRENCE 

Characters, Heavies, etc. Appearance, Ward- 
robe, Ability— Study A-l. Tall. Any Dialect. 
Address Jefferson Hotel. Charleston, W. Vs., 
until June 21, then Revere Hotel, Chicago, III. 

Murray Stock Co. Wants 

Young leading man. Clever woman for sou- 
brettes and must have a good singing and 
dancing specialty . A good hustling agent 
who knows the territory and not afraid of 
paste. Other useful people write. Address 
with full particulars and lowest salary. 
WILLIAM DE WOLFE, 44S Smith St., Provi- 
dence, R. L 



CMAKEC Pices, Bull and King Snakes, 
9nHI\K9 Blll( . k snakes, etc. Monkeys, 
Macaws. Cockatoos, also Talking Parrots. gS.OO np. 
Birds every Variety. Dogs. etc. HOPE'S PET 
SHOP, Sept. 0, at N. 9th St., Philadelphia, Fa. 



WANTED 

YOUNG PRIMA DONNA. Must play parts. 
Comedian who can produce. For Musical "Tab." 
Year round work. Address, X. ». XEASZT, *S 
Court St., Bostoa. 

WANTED 



LADY FOR GENERAL BUSINESS. Tell 
all. CLIFTON MALLORY, 10 Evans St., 
Auburn, N. Y. 



Wanted at Once 

A-l medicino performer-. Moit do Irish, Dutch, 
blackface comedian*. Sketch team and single 
mas wanted, must be able to take parts In acta. 
Also, must be able to change, two wwta stand*. 
Also, wanted real long haired Indian performer, 
with A-l continue. Cheyenne Charley, write. Ad- 
dress DR. J*. WHITECLOtTD, Gen. Del,. Dei 
Xoinei, Iowa. 

THEATRES WANTED 

Anywhere. Long lease or may pur- 
chase. Large seating capacity pre- 
ferred. Responsible client. JACOB 
WEISS, 1 Bridge Plaza, Long Island 
City. Telephone 1123 Astoria. 

WANTED 

People in all lines for Vaudeville Acta 

Especially want small man, also child. Answer 
by letter only stating all. Send photos and pro- 
grams, which will be returned. State lowest. 
BOB FLETCHEB, No. 123 Hobart St., Ridcs- 
fluid Park, V. J. 



Buy Oklahoma's Largest Theater and 
Win Strike-Big Profits Possible 

STOCK WILL POSITIVELY BE ADVANCED FROM 40 PERCENT TO 100 PERCENT 

AT MIDNIGHT, JULY 1, 1917 

are behind the plan. It is indorsed as a safe and sound 



When a banker gets a good, inside, ground floor proposi- 
tion, he calls in his business associates, and they collectively 
pull together, pool their money, and put over great financial 

propositions AND CROW RICHER, while the average 

person — who never gets a look-in — wonders how they do it. 
THE BANKER IS NOT smarter than you are. He merely 
plays for big stakes in a big way— —and wins! We are 
offering YOU the BIG PROPOSITION where you can play 
for big stakes — and win) You can come in, NOW on the 
ground floor, and we believe grow RICHER in proportion 
to your investment in this mammoth company. Will you 
accept our offer) 

DO NOT THROW AWAY THIS ADVERTISEMENT 

It will appear in newspapers and periodicals throughout 
the state of Oklahoma and the nation — and just as sure as 
you are reading this announcement, just that certain are 
we to raise the CASH MONEY necessary to make this 
movement a gigantic success will you be one of the for- 
tunate ones to buy stock in this company and become iden- 
tified with what we have every reason to believe will be 
the greatest money-making theatrical venture ever launched 
anywhere in the world. $5, $10 to $100 may bring golden 
returns to you in thia company. 

FIRST OF AU 

You DO KNOW that theatrical syndicates are great 
money-making concerns. THERE IS NOT A STRING OF 
THEATERS owned by one syndicate in the state of Okla- 
homa. THERE ARE strings of theaters owned by syndi- 
cates in other states. We propose to operate THAT 
SYNDICATE in the state of Oklahoma, where the oppor- 
tunity is ready and waiting— a virgin field that stands 
beckoning for someone to reap a harvest rich with possi- 
bilities of financial gain. 

And we propose to let you hold GROUND FLOOR 
stock in this huge business enterprise. 

PROPOSITION IN A NUTSHELL 
The TUCKER BROTHERS Amusement Company was 
incorporated under the laws of the state of Oklahoma, 
May 26, 1917, capitalized at three hundred thousand dol- 
lars, to buy, build and operate theaters in the state of 
Oklahoma that will employ in every department union 
labor. Its first step was to take over the Overholser theater 
at $130,000, including lota, booking franchise, contents and 
good will. It plans te> buy or build theaters also in Tulsa, 
Ardmore, Muskogee and other cities. This company already 
has an option for a big theater in Tulsa, Okla. We are 
now selling stock to the public to insure the success of this 
gigantic proposition. In order to complete the Overholser 
deal we must raise $5,000 by July I and $25,000 by Sep- 
tember 1 5, when we take possession of the property and 
get a warranty deed; the balance just like rent at $10,000 
per year. The Overholser has rented for years at $12,500 
per year, making in addition to this rental a good sum total 
profits for the lessees. Every share of stock is sold on a 
dividend basis, and shares alike with all other stock in the 
profits and ownership of the Overholser theater or any 
other theater that this company may acquire. The Over- 
holser theater should make $25,000 per year profit to this 
company. 

OKLAHOMA'S BIGGEST THEATER 

The Overholser theater is Oklahoma's biggest theater, 
seats 1,600 people; main floor, balcony and gallery, magni- 
ficent four-story structure, with offices and storerooms in 
front that net a handsome rental; plays the big road attrac- 
tions, also vaudeville, stock and pictures; recognized as 
one of the finest theaters in the United States. Estimated 
value NOW from $150,000 to $250,000. Ground, 85x140, 
in heart of Oklahoma City. Was bought by this company 
at a bargain. 

INDORSED BY UNION PEOPLE IN OKLAHOMA CITY 

With the belief that with the Overholser placed in the 
union ranks by this company, that it will WIN THE STRIKE 
for the local boys, Oklahoma City trades unionists to a man 



business enterprise by the Oklahoma City Central Trades 
and Labor Council; also the striking musicians, also the 
striking stage hands, and also the striking moving picture 
operators, and union actors all over the nation support 
the movement. 

We believe that we will be able to raise enough MONEY 
from union men ov«z the nation who want to see the theater 
strike in Oklahoma City WON to pay CASH for the Over- 
holser theater in ninety days. This stock-selling campaign 
is NOT CONFINED to union men only. Anyone woo is 
a friend to labor may buy. 

You will — AS A BUSINESS PROPOSITION — be buying 
stock in a company that is big enough and strong enough 
to overcome all obstacles. There are 68,000 union opera- 
tors and stage hands, 100,000 union musicians, 75.000 
union actors who are vitally interested in THE THEATER 
WAR in Oklahoma City, a strike that has been on for one 
year. These men will, we believe, come in for $5 to $10 
each when called upon to WIN THE STRIKE. Every union 
man everywhere should send in at least $ I . 

The Tucker Brothers, who are at the head of this com- 
pany, are experienced, successful theatrical men. THIS IS 
NOT AN EXPERIMENT. The Tucker Brothers own THE 
DAILY POINTER newspaper in Oklahoma City, established 
by them in 1906. and have their OWN MEANS OF PUB- 
LICITY necessary to make any theatrical venture in Okla- 
homa City operated by them a big, sure money-maker. 
Tucker Brothers operated the big Metropolitan union theater 
successfully in Oklahoma City for two years. Tucker 
Brothers are now operating the beautiful Dreamland union 
theater in Oklahoma City successfully. Their business 
reputation is unquestioned. 

THE STOCK WILL POSITIVELY BE ADVANCED from 
40 to 100 per cent at Midnight. July I, 1917. 

We are working night and day to handle orders for this 
stock. You must act quick. 

BONA FIDE INVESTMENT 



Na 



Special Sacrifice Stock Offer. 25c Share 

4 shares $ 1 .00 

10 share $ 2.50 

20 shares $ 5.00 

40 shares $ 10.00 

80 shares $ 20.00 

100 shares $ 25.00 

200 shares $ 50.00 

400 shares $ 100.00 

1.000 shares $ 250.00 

5.000 shares $1,250.00 

1 0,000 sharea $2,500.00 

(Par value of all shares, $1.) Stock is non-assessable. 
Put an X opposite the stock you want and make all re- 
mittances payable to Tucker Brothers Amusement Com- 
pany. Write your name and address plainly. 



Yours for organized labor, 
TUCKER BROTHERS AMUSEMENT COMPANY. 

308 West Main St. In Tucker Brothers Dreamland Lobby. 
Office open from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. Oklahoma City. Okla. 
Reference, First State Bank. 

Dudley R. Tucker, President. 

Howard A. Tucker. Vice President. 

Wm. L. Tucker, Secretary-Treasurer. 
The three Tucker Brothers all have paid up cards in the 
Typographical Union, having been members for years. It 
is written in the by-laws of this company to always employ 
union labor, and for thia reason organized labor is behind 
this plan to a ■ man. 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 




H.O. DAVIS IS NEW CZAR OF 

TRIANG LE, FIGH TING WASTE 

General Manager Reported to Be Holding Daily Conferences — 

Will Save Millions Is Belief —Fate of Ince and 

Sennett Said to Be at Stake 



A battle to save millions in production 
costs for the Triangle Film corporation is 
raging fiercely through directors' meetings 
that have been held almost daily for the 
last two weeks. 

All eyes center upon H. O. Davis, 
familiarly known among insiders as 
"Spreckles' Man," who left the Universal 
Film Co. and became general manager of 
the Triangle a month ago. Just now he 
is known to be the colossus of Triangle 
and the future bope of its stockholders. 

Woven into the decisions and judgment 
of Mr. Davis, whose word is regarded as 
more weighty than the united voice of every- 
one else in the organization, is the fate of 
Mack Sennett and Thomas. H. Ince. It is 
known that the salvaging operations of 
Davis largely aim at a reduction of the 
expenditures of these two men. 

The contracts of the companies controlled 
bj Ince and Sennett are nearly up. It is 
said the documents provide for $50,000 a 
week to each of these men, to be earned 
by Sennett producing two two-reel com- 
edies, and Ince one five-reel drama weekly. 
Ont of these sums the cost of the pictures 
are paid. If the two directors kept up 
a consistent pace of production along these 
lines, the arithmetical fact would be an 
income of $2,600,000 a year to each. 

From various sources The Clxppeb learns 
that a revision downward of the enormous 
tariffs thus paid to Sennett and Ince are 
one of the principal problems of the Tri- 
angle heads. 

It is generally regarded as certain that, 
before many days have passed, the two 
directors will be signed up on a more mod- 
erate wage scale or working for some new 
boas. 

The power of Mr. Davis on this score 
is noted from a view of his exact status 
in the Triangle organization. Hitherto, it 
has been understood that Charles Lynch, 
of Atlanta, was the newest supreme chief 
of Triangle, the announcement that he had 
purchased a controlling interest in the 
Triangle Distributing Corporation, making 
it so appear. 

The facts, however, show that Mr. Davis 
controls the Triangle Producing Corpora- 
tion, which owns the entire producing in- 
terests, all the distributing interests out- 
side of the United States and half the in- 
terests of the Triangle Distributing Cor- 
poration, operating exclusively in this 
country. Therefore, whereas, Mr. Lynch 
owns half the latter organization and is its 
president, his power in the whole combina- 
tion is relatively only 25 per cent, that of 
Mr. Davis. 

But Lynch brings to Triangle a pecu- 
liarly valuable leverage for all negotiations 
with high priced craftsmen. He controls 
the. Southeastern rights of the Paramount 
Distributing Corporation. 

As Paramount is the only organization of 
magnitude and producing policy parallel 
with that of Triangle, it is understood that 
the ambitions of Ince and Sennett are thus 



likely to be under considerable check. 

The affairs of Triangle throw two ele- 
ments into strong relief. They are Davis, 
on one side, and the high cost of pro- 
duction on the other. 

Davis is an efficiency expert, a high class 
waste killer, and — if definite rumors are 
correct — he's the man with the money bag 
in Triangle. 

The production record of Triangle reads 
like that of Cheops, on tablets dug from 
the third city below Nineveh. They pale 
the tales of Babylon. Consider an in- 
stance of Sennett's operations: 

Sennett made the film "Mickey," featur- 
ing Mabel Normand. The work consumed 
about one year, and cost, it is said, $204,- 
000. Sennett is said to have cut the film 
down to twenty reels now, and there is 
hope of getting it down to nine reels some 
day. It is said 200,000 feet of film' were 
"shot" for this picture. 

D. W. Griffiths built a Babylonian set 
that was the marvel of the film age, and 
that cost $76,000. The wind blew this 
structure down, wrecking it completely. It 
was rebuilt at the same cost. After about 
two years, the set is being torn down at 
similar high cost. 

"Oriental Love" and "The Snow Cure," 
two Sennett comedies, are said to have 
taken many weeks to make, and to have 
cost heavy sums. It is reported that, after 
A. E. Gillstrom had journeyed to Truckee, 
Cal., at great expense, to shoot the snow 
stuff, Sennett caused many of the interiors 
to be "shot" all over again. 

The ability of Davis as a waste killer 
has been gained in a sparkling experience. 
He was an executive of the San Diego fair 
several years ago, acting under indirect en- 
gagement by Rudolph Spreckels, the sugar 
king, who virtually owns San Diego. 

Then he came to the Universal. The 
efficiency system Davis injected into Uni- 
versal operations put the cost down so low, 
it is said, that the biggest expense was raw 
film, and the Davis brand of pictures was 
generally regarded as pretty good. 

Mr. Davis granted a . brief interview to 
Tar Clipper the other day, in reference to 
Triangle affairs. 

He declared that he and Mr. Lynch were 
working in full accord, and co-operating 
on every detail of Triangle business. He 
also asserted that the friendliest spirit pre- 
vailed between them and Ince and Sennett, 
who have been in frequent conference with 
the Triangle chiefs. 

"The most important problem before us," 
said Mr. Davis, "is that of deciding on 
future types of films, a standard length 
and similar details. That is natural, since 
the public taste undergoes changes and re- 
quires different producing policies from 
time to time. This is recognized by other 
companies, as you no doubt have observed 
in recent reports of reorganizations. 

"We feel confident at this time of re- 
taining .the. services of both. Mr. Ince and 
Mr. Sennett." 



GOFF VISITING BRANCHES 

Albert W. Goff, assistant general man- 
ager of V. L. S. E., is now away on his 
regular semi-annual trip, which will take in 
every branch office of the "Big Blue Rib- 
bon" distributing organization, for the pur- 
pose of explaining to each branch manager 
personally the exact manner in which the 
new service about to be started by V-L- 
S-E should be handled. Goff will probably 
be gone for several months. 



BRANDT IS IN CHICAGO 

Joe Brandt, general manager of the 
Universal Film Manufacturing Co., is in 
Chicago making arrangements for the 
Universal and subsidiary companies' booths 
at the exhibition there next month. 



SUPERLATIVE STAR A RECRUITER 

- Irving Cummings, who, at the head of 
his own company, is busily engaged film- 
ing the first production for the Superlative 
Pictures Corporation, several days ago 
proved himself a great recruiting sergeant 
up at Port Henry, N. Y. Cummings was 
taking exterior scenes for his production, 
which is described as much on the order 
of "The Barrier," when the citizens of the 
town asked him to take a hand at inspir- 
ing the young men thereabout to enlist. 

The actor jumped to the task, and made 
a few of the most patriotic addresses the 
old' resident ers ever heard. The Superla- 
tive organization bids fair to bid for. a 
leading place in filmdom. Its organization 
was announced a fortnight ago through 
the medium of a fine luncheon at The 
Astor to 'representatives of the trade 
press. Besides Cummings' producing 
group, the corporation will distribute pic- 
tures made by the Lois Meredith film 
Corporation. Si. F. Tobias is president of 
Superlative. He intends to use original 
distributing methods. 



GRIFFITH IS IN TRENCHES 

D. W. Griffith, who went to Europe to 
attend the presentations of "Intolerance" 
at Drury Lane Theatre, London, is in the 
battle trenches in France and Belgium, 
and has been doing some special work for 
the British War Office and for the French 
Government. The nature of this work is 
secret, but whatever is being done will 
have an American participation, as Mr. 
Griffith has called to Europe several of the 
best known people who have appeared in 
his recent productions. Among these are 
Bobby Harron, the Gish Sisters (Lillian 
and Dorothy), and Bily Bitzer, his 
cameraman, who has been with Mr. Grif- 
fith ever since he began making big feature 
pictures. Bitzer and the American players 
sailed on the same English ship that took 
General Pershing and his staff to England, 
where they landed last Thursday morning. 



THIS LARKIN NOT THE ONE 

George Laxkin, the Kalem moving pic- 
ture actor, wishes his friends to know that 
he is not the George T^rlrin who was in 
the courts, recently, in Chicago, on the 
charge of having taken $84 away from 
Dolvie M. Stoker, after marrying her. 
Larkin was in Jacksonville, Fla., at the 
time, and had received communications 
from Miss Stoker, saying she had married 
a George Larkin and inquiring if he were 
the man. He replied that he was not. 
Larkin says he would like to meet the 
man who is using his name. 



SELL SUBSEA FILM 

Williamson Brothers announce that they 
have just closed a deal with Jones, Linick 
& Schaefer. of Chicago, whereby the latter 
concern will take "The Submarine Eye," 
and, after giving it an extended run at the 
Studebaker Theatre, will book it through- 
out the State of Illinois. 



HAS INVENTION TO PRESERVE FILM 

One of the most important innovations 
in the film industry, which promises to 
revolutionize the entire production of 
moving pictures through the preservation 
of films and in a short time will affect 
every foot of film, has just been brought 
to the attention of the trade-papers 
through a contract which was signed dur- 
ing the past week between Shepard and 
Van Loan, Major O. J. Allenbaugh, of the 
Film Renovating Co., and W. C. Fields, 
president of the Hedwig Laboratories. 
This contract provides that the Hedwig 
Laboratories is to use the "Allenbaugh 
Process" on all of the films handled by 
this organization. 

For three years Major Allenbaugh, the 
inventor of this process, who has already 
been termed "The Edison of the Movies" 
— because of the many other inventions he 
has on various moving picture appliances, 
which will command world-wide attention 
"when be announces them — has been work 1 
bag on this invention. He has labored 
over it night and day, never tiring, never 
losing his faith in bis invention, which 
he felt certain would some day gain for 
him recognition in the trade. 

During that time efforts have been 
made to obtain the secret of his process. 
But, although every means was used by 
some of the largest companies in the busi- 
ness, to learn bow the process was applied, 
all have been in vain, for the Major has 
closely guarded it and has refused to re- 
veal the slightest hint of its composition. 



WRITER SAYS HE WAS BEATEN 

Post Jefferson, N. Y., June 11. — Hugh 
Weir, scenario writer, has brought suit 
against the Universal Film Manufacturing 
Company, Harry Shepard and Joe Brandt 
for damages to the amount of $50,000. 
Weir states that be went to the Universal 
Company on a business errand sometime 
ago, and alleges that he was beaten up by 
Brandt and Shepard, that several of his 
ribs were broken and that be was in- 
capacitated for a considerable while. The 
defendants' attorneys have made answers 
to the complaint, and matters will soon be 
brought to a head in the Suffolk County 
Court, where the case is being tried. The 
defendants deny that Weir was ever beaten 
up by them. 



PEGGY HYLAND RETURNS 

Peggy Hyland and her company of play- 
ers, including her leading man, "Bill" 
Davidson, have returned from Long Island 
where they have spent the last few weeks 
filming the exterior scenes of the first May- 
fair production, "Persuasive Peggy," under 
the direction of Charles Brabin. 



LLOYD WILLIS IS SICK 
Lloyd Willis, assistant general manager 
of the Fox Film Corp.. is in. Keane, New 
Hampshire, recuperating from a serious 
illness. It is expected that he will be 
fully recovered and resume his duties in a 
few weeks. 



MISS STEVENS BACK IN FILMS 

Emily Stevens makes her return to the 
screen in "The Slacker." a Metro picture 
which is being rushed to completion. 




WILLIAM A. BRADY, Director-General. 
WORLD-PICTURES 

Present 

ETHEL CLAYTON 

"THE STOLEN PARADISE" 

Cut including EDWARD LANGFORD. 
Directed by HARLEY KNOLES. 
Story by FRANCES MARION. 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



Chart No. S June 13, 1917 

A REVIEW OF REVIEWS 

FROM TRADE CRITICISMS 

Compiled by The New York Clipper 

Cut oat this chart and paste in scrap book for reference. 


1 


N«rr>« of Film 


CLIPPER 


WORLD 


NEWS 


TELEGRAPH 


TRADE REVIEW 


•TARENTAGE" 

Sociological drama — 
Frank Seng, State Rights. 
Featuring Hobart Henley. 
Director: Hobart Henley. 


"A real picture, with a 
real purpose and a very 
real punch." 


"One of the best state 
rights pictures on the 
market — offers much en- 
tertainment." 

(Issue June 23.) 


"One of the most en- 
joyable features that has 
been offered to the state 
rights buyers. Pleases 
and entertains over every 
foot" 

(Issue June 23.) 


"A forceful presenta- 
tion of a very worth-while 
story. Entertaining aa a 
story as well as impres- 
sive as a message." 
(Issue June 10.) 


"A remarkably good 
film. Not only teaches a 
moral but it entertains as 
well." 

(Issue June 10.) 

"Has been so skillfully 
woven that the picture 
will win unquestionably 
public favor." 

(Issue June 16.) 


2 


"STOLEN PARADISE" 

Drama — World. Five 
Reels. Featuring Ethel 
Clayton. Director: Har- 

ley Knoles. 


"An unusually strong 
dramatic film." 


"A good supply of in- 
cident." 

(Issue June 23.) 

j 


"Has been accorded a 
fair production. There 
are a few slips in detail 
which are too small to 
warrant more than pas- 
sing attention." 

(Issue Jnne 23.) 


"A tale of romance, 
love and life, splendidly 
cast and well staged and 
one that is. bound to find 
favor." 

(Issue June 10.) 


3 
4 


"FIELD OF HONOR" 

War Drama — Butter- 
fly. Five reels. Featur- 
ing Allen Holubar. Di- 
rector: Allen Holubar. 


"A good film. A well 
told story with well de- 
vised suspense." 


"Artistic and pleas- 
ing." 

(Issue June 23.) 


"Presented in a realis- 
tic manner. There is .n 
valuable vein of heart in- 
terest." 

(Issue June 23.) 


"Altogether 'The Field 
of Honor* is one of Uni- 
versale best." 

(Issue June 10.) 


(Review not available 
to date.) 

(Issue June 16.) 


"FILLING HIS OWN 
SHOES" 

Modern Drama — Es- 
sanay. Five reels. Fea- 
turing Bryant Washburn. 
Director : Harry Beau- 
mont 


"The story is really 
secondary t o Bryant 
Washburn whose person- 
ality would make any 
vehicle entertaining." 
* 


"The most pleasing 
part * • * is the atmos- 
phere." 

(Issue June 23.) 


"A refreshing red- 
blooded story. Ends with 
a punch." 

(Issue June 23.) 


"Is fairly lively and en- 
tertaining mostly through 
the efforts of Mr. Wash- 
burn." 

(Issue June 10.) 


(Review not published 
to date.) 

(Issue June 16.) 

"While decidedly ave- 
rage in type, should make 
a satisfying evening's the- 
atrical fare." 

(Issue June 16.) 


5 


"THE INNER SHRINE" 

Society Drama — Lasky. 
Five Reels. Featuring 
Margaret Illington. Di- 
rector: Frank Reicber. 


"Many inconsistencies 
in the story and in the 
character drawing. What 
interest there is, is due to 
the work of the players." 


"At a number of its 
biggest moments it fails 
to convince." 

(Issue June 23.) 


"We were disappointed 
in this play, but the even 
support throughout and 
the fame of the book will 
doubtless make it a satis- 
factory box office at- 
traction." 

(Issue June 23.) 


"Margaret Illington is 
not at her best at any 
time in this picture." 
(Issue June 10.) 


6 


"TO-DAY" 

Society Drama — Harry 
Rapf. Starring Florence 
Reed. Director : Ralph 
Inoe. 


"fa one great big. 
punch.". 


"Technically * • • is 
all it should be. The 
question for the exhibitor 
to decide is whether or 
not it would be wise to 
show such a subject." 
(Issue Jnne 23.) 


(Review not published 
to date.) 

(Issue June 23.) 


"An exceedingly dra- 
matic picture. One of the 
strongest of the year. 
Adds new laurels to 
Ralph Ince's reputation 
and to Florence Reed's." 
(Issue June 10.) 


"A notable film achieve- 
ment. An attraction 
which no exhibitor can 
afford to overlook." 
(Issue June 16.) 


7 


"THE QUESTION" 

Modern Drama — Vita- 
graph. Five Reels Fea- 
turing Harry Morey and 
Alice Joyce. Director : 
Perry N. Vekroff. 


"The happy ending has 
spoiled an otherwise ex- 
cellent film." 


"There are a kind of 
folk who take great in- 
terest in dreams and 
dream plays. They will 
like "The Question." 
(Issue June 23.) 


"Four reels of sus- 
tained mental agony, 
without any comedy re- 
lief. Strictly judged this 

play is immoral." 
(Issue Jnne 23.) 


"The work of the two 
stars is the high .spot of 
the picture and makes it 
one well worth seeing. 
(Issue June 10.) 


"A vivid and strong 
melodrama." 

(lame June 16.) 


8 


"LOVE OR JUSTICE" 

Sociological Drama — 
Ince-Kay Bee. Five reels. 
Featuring Louise Glaum. 
Director : Wallace Ed- 
wards. 


"An excellent film from 
all viewpoints. Well di- 
rected and capably acted." 


"A genuine screen story 
• • • and a strong one." 
(Issue Jnne 23.) 


"A melodrama that 
will without doubt appeal 
to lovers of such. A plot 
that is teeming with 
action." 

(Issue June 23.) 


"Interesting although 
along conventional lines. 
It is the type of feature 
that thrills the average 
spectator." 

(Issue June 10.) 


"Is conventional melo- 
drama but is interesting." 
(Issue June 16.) 





ICTUQ.EJ* 
JACK MULHALL 

"The Flame of Youth" 

A Dramatic Story of a Chip of the Old Block 

Directed by Elmer Clifton 

Book Through Any Unhrarul aast—BS 




34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 13, 1917 



UNION MEN, OPffiATORS, STAGE 
HANDS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS 

Help Us Win the Oklahoma 
Olty Theatrical Strike 

"Remember, it can fee dune." 

If joo cannot spare $3 to $100, -end in a dollar 
or two for stock Is tbU mammoth company. 

Pint of all. let im ss.v tbat The Tucker Bros, 
plan to break tbe back of the Oklahoma City The- 
atrical Trust, which baa kept tbe Union Boys oa 
Str ike since last July, la endorsed by—. 

THE OKLAHOMA CITY TKADE8 ABD LABOR. 
COUNCIL in seealon May 31, 1917. saying In reso- 
lution that "we go on record faTorlna- the proposed 
venture as booa-nde, and a straightforward pro- 
position which we recommend to all Union men, to 
lDTest their money, feeling at all t&nee tbat they 
are assured of an honest conduct of said busiaeu, 
and farther that the successful launching of the 
corporation win materially assist the local anions 
on strike In Oklahoma City to ultimately win their 
strike and encourage the progress of organised 
labor the State and Nation orer.'* 

Signed W. H. CHASE, President; WALTER F. 
A LBRI GH T. Sec retary. 

THE TUCKER BROTHERS' AMUSEMENT COM- 
PANY is also endorsed by the International Stag* 
Hands *■■■*»,«■■ No. 112, Oklahoma City, in part as 
follows: "We unanimously endorse the Tucker 
Brothers' Amusement Company as a sound business 
proposition, and th e mea ns by whic h we will ulti- 
mately be able to WIN OUR STRIKE," Signed 
JOHN B. CAMPBELL. President; -L. E. ERWIN. 
A cting Secretary. 

TEE TUCKER BROTHERS AMUSEMENT COM- 
PANY Is also endorsed by the Moving Picture Ope- 
rators Protective Union, local number 3£0. United 
States and Canada, la O klaho ma Cit y, as follows: 
"As each one of the TTjrjnr Kft BROTHERS carry 
a card, and bare always been on tbe right side tn 
Oklahoma City Theatrical Strike, be It resolved 
that we endorse the proposition and agree to give 
It our aupport." Signed RAY PRELLs President; 
M. A. T1MMTE. Acting Secretary. 

The local striking musicians, CH AS. E. BAL- 
LARD, president, and MIKE PESHEK. JR.. secre- 
tary, endorse this plan. 

TH E PLA N IN BRIEF 

TUCKER BROTHERS AMUSEMENT COMPANY, 
capitalized at $300,000, was organized May 2Sth to 
buy. build, and operate theatres In Oklahoma tbat 
will employ Union Labor In every department. Its 
first step was to purchase the Overbolser theatre st 
S13O.00O. S5.00O to be paid July 1st; $25,000 Sep- 
tember 15th. then taking possession of property; 
$10,000 per year for ten years. 

The Overholser seats 1,600 persons; main floor, 
balcony, gallery; biggest theatre In the State, 
heart of tbe city, baa road-show franchise, esti- 
mated value $150,000 to $250,000; rents $12,500 
yearly. Was secured at a bargain. 

This Company Intends to locate string of the- 
atres in the State at Tnlsa, Ardmore. and other 
cities. 

Wonderful Investment opportunity. Stock selling 
like wildfire to Union men and friends In Okla- 
homa. We want tbe help of Union men throughout 
the Nation to buy this stock, and help raise enough 
money to pay cash for the Overholser Theatre, and 
sbow tbe world what Union men and organization 
can. and will, do to win a strike. 

Remem ber what was done for the DANBTJRY 
HATTERS. 

Union boys In Oklahoma City bave been strug- 
gling since last July. This movement will turn 
failure Into victory. Will you help os? We be- 
lieve you win. 

Send any amount from $1.00 to $100.00 and stock 
will be Issued In this gigantic enterprise aa fol- 
lows^ __ 

SPECIAL SACRIFICE STOCK OFFER: 
4 share* $ 1.00 

10 shares $ 2.50 

20 share* ...» 6.00 

40 shares $10.00 

to snares $ 20.00 

100 shares $ 25.00 

200 shares $ 50.00 

400 stores $100.00 

(Par Talue of all shares, $X.) Stock Is non- 
assessable. 

Put an X opposite the stock yon want and make 
all remittances payable to Tucker Brothers Amuse- 
ment Company. Write your name and address 
plainly. 

Name 

Yo urs for organized labor. 
TUCKER BROTHERS AMUSEMENT CO. 
Mske orders payable to TUCKER BROTHERS 
AMUSEMENT COMPANY, in Tucker Brothers 
T>mimlaxid Theatre Bui Id In p. fair to labor, SOS 

West Main Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

P. S.— A dollar or two won't be missed by you; 
make It more If you can. We want to hear from 
100.000 card men this week. 

It Is written in the by-laws of this corporation 
to always employ union labor. 

AT LIBERTY 

For Summer and Next Season. 

KARLE NELSON 

Juveniles, and General Bus. stock or One Piece. 
arc 27. 5 It. 10 in., weigh 133. Wardrobe, appear- 
and experience the best. Reliable men. onle. 
Address Caniateo, H. Y. 

IMADISONS' BUDGET No. 16 
contains enough comedy shrapnel to make anyl 
audience surrender. Price one dollar. Jamas] 
Madison, 1052 Third Avenue, Hew York. 

MAE McCREE 

THE WIZARD MISS OF UACTTME — OF BIO M 
Plraraaa — Bill fkM. 1021 Caaaaan El.,.. Ctfcasa. 



WILLIAMS STOCK PLAYS QUINCY 

Quincy, 111., June 8. — According to 
Manager Jade Hoeffler of the Orpbeum, 
this city, the vaudeville season just closed 
was the best he has ever bad. The Will- 
iams Stock Co., owned bj Hoeffler, will 
play the house all Summer, his other stock 
company will play St. Paul. Minn., and 
he is organizing a third company to play 
the Middle West. 




FERRY 
The Frog 

When "Ferry" appeared in France, 
the above reproduction of the 
show bill shows the American 
spirit which the managers dis- 
played in billing "Ferry the Frog." 

DIRECTION 

AARON KESSLER 

United Time 

HYPNOTIC SUBJECTS WANTED 

State experience. PROF. FEiSK PACKWA, 

1819 W. *7U> St., Chicago, HI. 

Wigs, Toupees, Grease Paint, Re. 

Send for Price List 

G. SHINDHELM, 1st Wet «th St., N. Y. 




ALBOLENE 



in almowt ixniP-rrsa/ Oft 

in the dressing room. 
We have many testimonials lrompromm**T.t 
artists. They all testify to its excellence 
as a make-up remover and say "it cuts 
the paint instantly so that it can be 
removed in a second." 

Alboltma is put up in x and a ounce tsscs 
to lit the mike- up box: also in ^~ and i tb. 
cans. Ic may be had of most druggists and 
dealers in make- up, SamfU/rtt 9* rtipust. 

McKES SON & ROBBINS 

Mannfsa cturin g Cbcmiats 
91 FoHon Street - New York 2 




STOP! 

Paring Corns Is 
Dangerous 

AND so are harsh liquids. 
Tbe only safe way is 
' Blue-jay. 
If yon want instant relief, 
if you want to end your corns 
in 48 hours, use tbe gentle 
Blue-jay. Last year millions 
of corns were ended in this 
quick, easy way. 

Most cases require but one 
treatment. A very small per- 
centage require a second or 
third treatment. 

Touchy corns are needless, 
and it is needless to risk 
dangerous ways to get rid 
of them. 

Decide now to gain otter 
freedom from your' corns. 
Purchase a package of Blue, 
jay Plasters at your drug- 
gist's. 

You gain instant relief, and 
in 48 hours your corn may 
be removed without pain. 

BAUER A BLACK 

Chicago and New York 

lakers of Sm 



ARE YOU 

in need of a new act, monologue or 
some new fill-in bits? If so, you 
can get what yon want from 

THE NEW No. 2 

McNALLY'S BULLETIN 

Everything New. Brisit aad Original 
PRICE 81.00 

McNALLY'S BULLETIN No. 2 contains 
17 SCREAMING MONOLOGUES. 

It GREAT ACTS FOR TWO MALES. 

• ROARING ACTS FOR MALE AND 
FEMALE. ""«-.-■.• 

22 SURE-FIRE PARODIES. 
A COMEDY SKETCH. Entitled "ANX- 
IOUS TO GET RICH." 

S MINSTREL FIRST-PARTS ending with 
a screaming FINALE. 

A TABLOID COMEDY AND BUR- 
LESQUE; also hundreds of Cross-Fire 
Gags and Jokes. Remember the price 
of McNALLY'S BULLETIN No. 2 is 
only ONE DOLLAR per copy, with 
money-back guarantee. 

WH. McXALLT, 81 E. lZStk St, New York 




PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty S L, 7 A. M. to li P. M . 

and at Midnight with Slsspsrs 

U MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. 23d St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P., Agent 
MS) BROADWAY, NEW' YORK 

AX LIBEJRtV" 



JOJM^U^J^^.. V -M _ VI m*£*7 



A-l mtUa t— silts and 

ten. bra. bu. Height, 5 ft. 
5 In Weight. 125 lbs. 
Age, 29 years. 



lifMtt liaaiaf aaaan w 
sates* tu. Helaht. 5 ft. 3 
In. Weight, 125 lbs. Ate, 

24 years. 



Blue 



•jay 

Stops Pain — Ends Corns 

Sold by All Druggists 
Abo sUna-jay Bunion Plasters 



Single and double future T*^«'»«« A-l appearance. 
Wardrobe. Best references. Jots on wire. 

Mcdonald & curtis 

69* TBXMONT ST., BOSTON. 

CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus, Boiling Globes, Clubs, Batooa, 
Guns, Wire Walkers' Apparatus and Novelties. 
Stamp for catalog SOW. YAH WYCK, 
Cincinnati. O. 



WANTED QUICK fig 

anything that can be naed with a 75-foot round top that it to house big musical comedy company. 
Seats — bines — turtle backs. 1,000 reserved folding chairs. Proscenium — marge* — portable stage — 
stage frame — tent tcenery— lights — circus B. * W. or electric light p lant. W ant tobuy qnlct 
for spot cash. Above most be In fair condition. Write, wire or phone. T.mTKH AJ, BhUTH, Camp 
Whitman Amusement Co., Beacon, K. Y. 



TWELVE YEARS SUMMER AND WINTER 

Happy Loo Whitney Stock Company Wants 

Man and woman for heavies and characters; only congenial people 'who have wardrobe and can 
act wanted. State all lowest salary. Pay own. WELSH AND WALBOURNE, Belding, Mich. 
Week June 11. 



AT LIBERTY Summer and Regular Season 

VIRGINIA POWELL EARL C. MAYO 

Versatile Leading Bus. Ingenue. Emotional or Leading or 2nd Bos. Juveniles, Light Comedy. 
Heavy. Height 5 ft. 4%, weight 12S, age 28 yrs. - Height 5 ft. 10, age 29 years, weight 160 lbs. 

joint Or single 
Address EARL C. MAYO, 2933 E Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



AT LIBERTY SATURDAY, JUNE 16 

RAY M. READ HARRY ROBERTS 



Age. 



Light Comedy and General Business. Age, 30. Character Comedy and General Business. 
Height, 5 ft. 5. Weight, 335. Height, 5 ft. 8. Weight, 137. 

Single or Joint engagement. Experience, ability , ward robe a nd appears nee A No. 1. Tickets, yes. 
Join anywhere on receipt of wire. Address GENERAL DELIVERY, StcCook, Nebraska. 



Tenney 



The vaudeville writer of vaudeville's best acts, sketches and mono- 
logues, if you owe yourself a. good act, better let me write it for 
you now. 

ALLEN SPENCER TENNEY, 1493 Broadway, New York. 



June 13, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



THE PARFAIT BLUES 

A Dollar's a Dollar, a Dim*'* a Dim*, thia one's th« place, you'll aavo It all th. tint 

PARFAIT MODE SHOP 



A Trial WOl Convince YOU 
J. FEICENBAUH A FELIX YOUNG. Men. 
MS W. aSth St, Suit. TO. Naw York 



Phone Utt Bryant 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Books for home 
amusement, Negro Plays, Paper, Scenery, Mrs. Jarley's Wax 
Works. Catalogue Free I Free I Freel 

SAMUEL FRENCH. 28 West Mtfa St., Now York 



CK OF THE NAME 

K3fi3S3^ TAYLOR'S ^ 
No. 2 

CIRCUS 

SPECIAL 

TRUNK 






r^aSBHE 



Thli trunk hu 

that wm bo 

sure to Interest 
too. Guru- 
teed non-leak- 

ebl. and win «i»a a u i l eo (or a good 

rrjny jeers. 

Bod t«r ton particular! and our NEW 
ltiT OaTAioaium. 

C A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 

871 N. Habrtad St, Chicago, 111. 
XU W. 44th St, Hoar York. N. Y. 



THEATRES AND PRODUCTIONS, 
VAUDEVILLE ACTS EQUIPPED 

Now and Second Hand Scenery hi Stock 

MURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO 

Colombia Theatre Bid*, 47th * Broadway 

earner, Mgr 



Tel. Bryant 1343 



Tom Creamer, 





OFFICIAL 
DOCTOR 


N. 


V.A. 


Dr. 


William 


H. 


Goldberg 




£53 WEST 83rd STREET 


Tel. 8828 Schuyler 




NEW YORK 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, $5.00 

Big Bargain. Hare been need. Aleo a few 
Second Hand Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunki, $10 and $15. A few extra large 
Property Trunk!. Alio old Taylor Trunk, 
ud Bal Trunks. 
Parlor Floor, a W. Slat St, Now York City 



""■MS 



.in 



, all colors. Entire compan- 
\it>s fitted inWhours. ' 



Ewry Stage 
I t cqitttPm M t t 



B»trtiss^tisfit>dhprft 



1554 B'umy 




Moving Picture 
Camera 

We manufacture them and 
make them up to date, In 
erery way, for a reasonable 
price. Catalogue ebearraUy 
furnished. Dealer In supplies. 
L. HeU, 80S E. S3xd 8t., 
Sew York. 



MAac 



lot 10c 
Can. 



ACT8 FOR BALE CHEAP. Wo 
Boy, Bell or Bxehanse naad 
Apparatus, Professional Cata- 
ParloF Trick catalog FREE. Write or 
Mag-io Co., Sta. 1, 870 8tk AT., H.T. 



5.000 9x12 Heralds. 4 pp.. each pat* 6i9 S11.50 

10,000 9x12 Heralds, 4 pp., each pat! 8x9 19.00 

8.000 10HXI4 Heraldi. 4 pp., each Pan TxlOtt 12.50 
10,000 lOViiH Heraldi. 4 pp.. each pate TilOVs 20.00 

5.000 12x18 Heralda, 4 pp.. each pace 0x13.... 13.00 
10,000 12x18 Heralds, 4 pp.. each pate 0x12 25.00 

8,000 14x21 Heralda, 4 pp.. each pace 10Hxl4 17 .50 
10.000 14x21 Heralds, 4 pp.. each pan 10Uxl4 30.00 

8.000 8x24 Heralda, too sides 12.00 

10.0006x24 Heralds, two aides 19.50 

8,000 7x21 Heralda. two sides 12.50 

10.000 7x21 Herald), too Hdrs 20.00 

8.000 9x24 Heralds. Co sides 15.00 

10.000 9x24 Heralds, too aides 25.00 

8,000 IMtzU Heralds, tiro aide! 17.50 

10.000 10%x28 Heralds, tan sides 30.00 

Printed to order from type and cuts, black Ink on 
assorted poster paper. Ovinz to market conditions above 
prices for immediate acceptance, and subject to chance 
without notice. Send for price list. Boute Book, lOe. 
GAZETTE SHOW PUNTING CO.. Hattaao. III.. U. S. A. 



TIGHTS 

Cotton Tlchtj, tctj good quality. 
s pair 90c, Wonted TlgbU, 
metllam weigtU. $2.25 a pair. 
Worsted Tights, beary wight. 
$3.00 a pair. Imported dlk 
plaited tights. In bright Bed and 
golden Brawn, only $2- 50 a 
pair. SUkoUne Tights In all 
colors, $2.50 a pair. Beary 75 
per cent. Imported silk tights. 
In bright Bed only, reduced from 
$6.00 to $4.00 a pair. Full 

sleeve Shirts to match tights, 

same price as tights. Orders 

filled promptly. Clipper Catalog 
free on application. 

BERNARD MANDL 
£10-212 W. HADTSOK ST. CHICAGO, ILL. 




BB&B Special 

Wardrobe Trunk 

5 Ply Fibre Covered 
Chicago: Marshall Field & Co. $45.00 

Send for Catalogue 
B B A B TRUNK CO, Pittsburg. Pa. 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS. ETC. 
N. Y. PLAY BUREAU, Tre- 
mont Theatre, N. Y. City. 
Stamp lor catalog. 



NEW DROPS, $10.00 

Painted to Order. Any size up to 15x20 feet, 
in either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colors. 
82.00 deposit with each order. Schell'e Scenic 
Studio, Columbus, O. 



Puone 1828 Greeley 

REIBER'S 

Lone* and short diatance moving. Day and night 
service. If we take order we get you there. 
Auto Theatrical Transfer Co., 278 West 88th St. 



NOW READY 

THE J CLIPPER 
RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

For Season 1916-1917 
It contains the names and addresses of Man. 
agera, Vaudeville and Dramatic Agent! in New 
York. Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh, San Francisco, Canada; Music Pub- 
lishers; Theatrical Clubs and Societies; Mov- 
ing Picture Finns, and other information. 
Sent only on receipt of 2c stamp, accom- 

YORK CLIPPER aPOn CUt fr0m ™* NEW 



CUT OUT AND 

Send this Coupon and 2c stamp for A 
copy of 

THE CLIPPER RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 
(For 1118-1817) 

To THE NEW YORK CUPPER 

IBM Broadway, New York 



New Victoria Hotel 

IN NEW YORK AT b roadway and 
an 1-ie.vy ivrgvgv JjaHQ ACRE SQOARE 

145 to 155 West 47th Street 

"The Very Heart of New York** 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 
350 ROOMS 260 PRIVATE BATHS 

Every Modern Convenience Eu rop ea n Plan Exclusively 



ABE MIERS. Manager of Cafe Drop in at any time 

Single rooms, hot and cold water I 

Single rooms, private bath tut and up> 

Suite, parlor, bedroom and bath 84 and up 

Suite, parlor, 2 bedrooms and bath S3 and up 

The Best 50c. Dinner in New York 



C. A. HOLL1NGSWORTH 



Naw York City 





Others Succeed. Why Can't Teal 

STAGE TRAINING 

Draaa, C a en ey . vsaerillta, sta*. Oeea- 
lao sad Paste May Taaaat. tvebrdeal 
and Practical Courses. Celebrities who 
stndltd under Mr. Alrtene; Annette Kel- 
lenwnn, Kara Bares, Hasei Dawn. 
Joseph Santlry. Harry Fllesr, aula, 
Daaie. liarj Fuller. Dolly Sisters, Taylor 
Holmes. Vlrtin Freacott, Eleanor Palnlar 
and other*. Write for eauuonse nsen- 
tiocini (tody dedred. 

Airier* Theatre School of Acting 

87th St, at Broadway 

Entrance 228 W. 57th St.. New Tort- 



SECOND-HAND 

GOWN S 



ANDREWS. 506 S. Stata Sl, CHICAGO 



TIGHTS 

Silk Opera Hose and Stockings 

ABB ODB 8PB0ULT1B8 

QUALITY PRICES the LOwai 

Gold tad Stiver Brocades, SOka, Battaa, 

Theatrical Jewelry, Bpsaglae, Bto. 

Sold and Silver THrsmlaea. 



*£«* 



. Beard* and all Seeds Theatrlasl. 
italogoes and Samples upon nqaest. 

When asking for Catalogue, please aveatioB 
what goods are wasted. 

SIEGM AN & WEIL 

8. W. Cor. 17 th 1 1. aaa aUdiiea Am 
THB THBATBIOAL BUPFLI aOeTOBlTJal 



Telophonee — 8203-0041 Bryant. 

Liberty Construction Co. 

F. O'ROCRKE AND P. LENNO.N. 

New and Second Hand SCENERY, PROPERTIES. 

AND LUMBER. STAGE ELECTRIC 

APPLIANCES. 

Liberty Theatre. 801 Went 47th St., New York 

Ererytblnc iwed liy "Birth of a Xntion" and 
"Intolerance" furnished by as. 

YOU CAN RENT SCENERY 

For Try Outs, for Vaudeville Acta, 

Complete Productions 
We Supply Amateurs and Stock Com- 
panies with Everything 

MILLARD H. FRANCE CO.. Scenic Studios 
5C4-S04 Weat 28th St. Naw York 



Enlarged and Beautified 

MOUQWN'S 

6th Ave., bet. 27th and 28th Sta., N. Y. 

MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC 8J0 P. M. to 1 A. M. 



^LBTDBFBOVB ^^f9i IT IB BUST. 
\ Bead aOe. far •suatsaea. ' lis w. each at.. ■. r. 



C L I F» F» E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding; one line la 

length will be published, properly claiilfied, la 
this index, at the rate of $10 for one year (SI 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running. 

CHEWING GUM-BALL-CANDY COATED. 

Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factories Bldg., 
Toledo, O. 

LAWYERS 
F. L. Boyd, Attorney, 17 '». La Salle St., 

Chicago. 
E. J. Ader, 10 South La Salle St, Chicago, UL 

MUSIC COMPOSED, ARRANGED. 

Chas. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 

Howard Tuttle, 141 Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

5S1-583-SS5 South High St., Columbus, O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
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phia, Pa. 

SONC BOOKS. 
jney, 117 P ark Ron . 
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~UTT~ 
it, S 
Newton Art Works, 805 W. 18th St., New Yes*. 



TENTS. 
J. C. Gosi Co.. 10 Atwater St.. Detroit. Mick. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 187 Washington St., Bea- 
ton, Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardware Co., 47 Eliot St.. Boats*. 
Mass. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 
E. Walker, 309 W. 39th St., New York. 

TRANSFERS. 
Walton, 455 W. 33d St.. N. Y. 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
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Show 
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PAINTS, ETC 

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Ill N. Ninth SL, PbUsdeipeUe 



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Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Fall Dress, Tuxedo sa. Prince Albert Suit* 

LUCY GOODMAN, 2315 S. State St., ChJcage 

MUSIC ARRANGED 

PIANO. ORCHESTRA. Melodies written te 
song poems. W. H. NELSON, Astor Theatre 
Bldg., 1531 Broadway. N. Y. 



MANUSCRIPT PLAYS 

SMUSICAl •COMCOH'S 



CHICAGO 

Manuscript go. 



-TABLOIOS. ETC 



431 *0- CLARK ST. CHIC AGO. ill 



IMPORTANT.— EVERETT J. # EVANS. _ 

poser-Arranger, makes a specialty of writia* 
music for new authors, and assists publicatiosm. 
Send jour poems or complete songs. T.sta.b, 
1900. Suite 505. Astor Theatre Bldg., 45th asm. 
Broadway, N. V. 



WIGS 



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CAVANAUGH 



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RUTH 



TOMPKINS 



(Mrs. Earle Cavanaugh) 



IN 



"Mr. Inquisitive" 

At B. F. Keith's Bushwick Theatre 

This Week, June 11 



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THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



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JUNE 20, 1917 



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PRICE TEN CENTS 




THE NATIONAL THEATRICAL WEEKLY 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER J«»c 20, 1917 



i 



William B. Friedlander 

(INCORPORATED) 

THEATRICAL ATTRACTIONS 

Desires to announce its new Offices, Rehearsal 
Rooms, and Headquarters are at 

1568 BROADWAY, N. Y. CITY 

(ONE STEP FROM PALACE THEATRE BUILDING) 



ADDRESS ALL BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE TO 

WILLIAM B. FRIEDLANDER, Inc. 



WANTED 

Theatrical Artists at all times; Principals and 
Chorus People at liberty, communicate by mail 
or in person to the above address after June 25. 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, lflU. 



NEW YORK, JUNE 20, 1917 



VOLUME LXV-No. 20 
Price, Ten Cent* 



ROAD CREWS 

WIN A $5 

RAISE 

NEW SCALE EFFECTIVE JULY JST 



After two weeks of conferences, the mem- 
bers of the Executive Board of the Inter- 
national Alliance of Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees and Motion Picture Operators of 
the United States and Canada, have se- 
cured a general increase of $5 per week in 
salary for members of the travelling crews 
of road attractions. As soon aa this was 
accomplished on Saturday the members of 
the Board departed for their homes. 

The obtaining of this increase in salary 
for the men on the road proved to be the 
most important business of the sessions. 
As a rule, these conferences last little 
more than a week. However, when the 
original request for the increase in scale 
was made to the managers it called for a 
$10 per week boost for carpenters, elec- 
tricians and property men and a $5 in- 
crease for their assistants. It also pro- 
vided for .a $5 increase in wages for the 
members of producing road crews. And 
these demands kept the conferences in ses- 
sion. 

This request met strenuous objection on 
the part of the United Theatrical Man- 
agers' Protective Association, which 
seemed to be disinclined, at this time, to 
grant the $10 increase to the heads of the 
mechanical departments. They placed the 
matter in the bands of Ligon Johnson, their 
secretary and legal representative, and a 
committee of managers was named to con- 
fer with the board. Finally, after a num- 
ber of conferences, an agreement was 
reached last Saturday afternoon whereby 
the managers will grant the increase to 
the assistants and to the members of the 
road producing crews, but the heads of the 
regular road crews will have to cut their 
demands in half. This new scale will go 
into effect July 1. 

In the future, the salary for the car- 
penters with road shows will be $45 instead 
of $40 a week; property men and elec- 
tricians will receive $40 a week instead of 
$35; assistant carpenters $40 instead of 
$35 and assistant property men and elec- 
tricians $35 instead of $30. The salaries 
of the members of the road crews, which 
were $5 above the scale of the carpen- 
ters, electricians, property men and their 
assistants, will be increased another $5 a 
week. 

At the offices of the International, it was 
stated that, as they had a hard fight to 
get the increase, they would carefully in- 
vestigate all contracts made by members 
of their locals with burlesque shows. It 
is claimed that in the past men working 
with these shows have made contracts with 
managers at the regular scale, but with a 
private agreement whereby they took from 
$5 to $10 less than the contract price for 
their service. The onion intends to have 
its organizers closely check up the members 
of these show crews and, where it is found 
that anyone is working nnder the scale, 
summary measures will be taken for his 
expulsion. 

The next session of the International 
Board will probably be held in December. 



BRENON OUTBIDS FOX 

That the feeling existing between Will- 
iam Fox and Herbert Brenon is still not 
of the friendly sort, was shown on Sunday 
evening at the Lamb's Gambol, when Bren- 
on outbid Fox for the autographed pro- 
gram of the event, securing it for $2,100. 

De Wolf Hopper, as auctioneer, almost 
dropped when Fox, seated in a lower box, 
made the first bid of $1,000. He said this 
amount was more than expected, but, as 
long as it started at this figure, probably 
someone might pay a little more. There 
was silence for about half a minute after- 
ward when a man in the front of the orches- 
tra, about ten feet away from Fox, chirped 
out $1,100. Fox then came back with an 
offer of $2,000. There was silence for 
another moment then, and, as Hopper was 
about to give it to Fox, the other man again 
raised, offering $2,100. Fox was not in- 
clined to go any further and the sale was 
over, Brenon getting the program. Brenon, 
who was a former director for Fox, has 
been his rival ever since he left bis employ 
after completing the last Kellerman pic- 
ture. 



WHITE RAT HEARING TOMORROW 

The hearing of the application of Goldie 
Pemberton for a visitation of the premises 
and the books of the White Rats' Actors' 
Union will be held in Part 1, Special Term 
of the Supreme Court, to-morrow. Three 
of the defendants, Henry H. Hodge, Harry 
Mountford and the Corporation, through 
their attorney, J. J. Myers, filed an an- 
swer to the allegations of the petition, in 
which it is stated that "certified account- 
ants went over the books of the organiza- 
tion at stated periods." Sapinsky & 
Sapinsky, attorneys for the petitioner, will 
submit a reply to this answer at the hear- 
ing. It is expected that the other de- 
fendants in the action will be served prior 
to the hearing. 



SHOW GIRL SUES HOTEL 

CtNClHNATJ, June 13. — Dorothy Keats, 
a show girl of the Winter Garden pro- 
ductions, and wife of Cliff Andrews, of 
this city, has filed a suit for $10,000 
damages against - the management of the 
Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Miss Keats 
alleges in her complaint that a detective 
broke into her room and accused her 
falsely. She recently successfully defended 
a suit for divorce brought by her husband. 



ABE LEAVTTT TO MARRY 

Abe Leavitt and Ruth Lock wood, who 
are appearing in a vaudeville act on the 
Keith Circuit, have announced their in- 
tentions of becoming life partners through 
the matrimonial route early in September. 
This will be Leavitt's second marriage, 
he having been divorced . from his first 
wife two months ago. She . was a bur- 
lesque chorus girl. 

ED. LEE WROTHE IN VAUDE. 

Ed. Lee Wrothe, the burlesque come- 
dian, will make his vaudeville debut at 
Keith's Jersey City theatre, next Monday, 
in a sketch entitled, "Janitor Higgins." 
He will' be assisted by six people. Joe 
Hart is booking the act. 



SETC0LUMBIA 
OPENING 

STANDS 

AMERICAN WHEEL NAMES HOUSES 



TO TRY OUT "BUSINESS WOMAN" 

"The Business Woman," a new play, 
from the pen of Robert Parks, will be 
given a tryout at Poli's, Washington, 
D. C, shortly. It may later be given a 
Broadway presentation. - - 



The Columbia and American Burlesque 
Circuits made complete arrangements last 
week for the inauguration of the 1917- 
1918 season. The Columbia Circuit, in 
its plans, has laid out the opening points 
for all of the shows, and has set Aug. 
20 as the official opening date of the sea- 
son. The American Circuit has given out 
a list of houses which will make the 
season thirty-four weeks long, but has not 
definitely decided upon the opening dates 
and points for the shows. 

A meeting of the Board of Directors of 
the American Circuit was held yesterday 
morning and three new houses added to 
the circuit. They are the Victoria Thea- 
tre, Pittsburgh; the Empire Theatre, Chi- 
cago, and the Empire Theatre, Hoboken. 
This will add an extra theatre in Chicago 
and two new towns to the Circuit. 

There will be a lay off of two weekB 
on each circuit, one in the West and the 
other in the East. The purpose of this is 
so that, in case Bhows on either circuit 
do not come up to the mark, they will 
be given an opportunity to lay off and be 
fixed up. The show laying off that week 
will play their engagement. The show 
being fixed up will, later in the season, 
play the engagement. 

Several shows on the Columbia Circuit 
will play preliminary engagements prior 
to the opening of the season. 

The shows on the Columbia Circuit 
which will open the season Aug. 20, and 
the houses they play, are as follows: 

Sporting Widows, Columbia, New York; 
20th Century Maids, Gaiety, Boston; Ir- 
win's Big Show, Empire, Albany, Mollie 
Williams Company, Gaiety, Montreal; 
Harry Hastings' Big Show, Syracuse and 
Utica; Liberty Girls, Corinthian, Roches- 
ter; Follies of the Day, Gaiety, Buffalo; 
Star and Garter, Gaiety, Toronto; Sam 
Howe, Gaiety, Detroit; Barney Gerards* 
"Some Show," Star and Garter, Chicago; 
Behman Show, Gaiety, St. Louis; Step 
Lively Girls, Gaiety, Kansas City; On 
Girl, Gaiety, Omaha; Hip, Hip, Hooray 
Girls, Des Moines, Iowa; Boston ians, 
Columbia, Chicago; Watson's Beef Trust, 
Olympic, Cincinnati, Best Show in Town, 
Lyric, Dayton. Ohio; Golden Crooks, Em- 
pire, Toledo; Rose Sydell, Star, Cleveland; 
Bon Tons. Gaiety, Pittsburgh: Ben Welch, 
Gaiety, Washington; Puss Puss, Palace^ 
Baltimore: Singer Show, People's Phila- 
delphia; Hello America, Majestic, Jersey 
City; Al. Reeves, Orpheum, Pateraon; 
Sam Sidman, lays off week 20th, opens 
Paterson week 27; Broadway Frolics, 
Miner's Bronx, New York; Million Dollar 
Dolls, Cohen's Newburgh and Poughkeep- 
sie; Roseland Girls, Jacques, Waterbury; 
Irwin's Majesties. Grand, Hartford ; Dave 
Marion, Casino, Boston; Merry Rounders, 
Colonial, Providence; Social Maids. 
Bridgeport, last three days; Maids of 
America, Empire, Brooklyn; Spiegel Re- 
vue, Hurtig & Seamon's, New York; Wat- 
son's "Burlesque Wonder Show," Casino, 
Philadelphia; Burlesque Review, Empire, 
(Continued on page 4.) 



WANTS $700 FROM SCHLESINGER 

NEWARK, June 18. — Nathan Schwartz, 
a candy merchant, wants $700 from Mor- 
ris Schlesinger, manager of the Broad 
Street Theatre, for breach of contract. 

Schwartz alleges that Schlealnger sold 
him the candy privilege for the Orpheum 
Theatre for the season of 1915 for $700, 
with the understanding that the house was 
to be operated as a stock house exclusively. 
Instead, he says, that Schleslnger oper- 
ated the theatre as a moving picture house. 
The contract expressly provided, he stated, 
that if the house was operated as anything 
but a Rtock house, the $700 was to be 
returned. A demand was made on Scbles- 
inger for the return of the money, and 
it not being forthcoming, Schwartz, on 
June 1, served Schlesinger with a sum- 
mons and complaint, which is returnable 
to-morrow. 



THEATRE MUSICIANS FLEECED 

Boston, June 10. — At a recent re- 
hearsal in the Park Theatre, Waltham, a 
suburb of Boston, a man walked into the 
orchestra pit and announced he was a 
government collector. Each member of 
the orchestra was asked the value of his 
instrument and paid n war tax to the "col- 
lector." One man paid forty cents, and 
the cornetist paid $1.50. Altogether, about 
$4 was collected. 

State, Boston and Waltham police, are 
looking for the man. Collector John F. 
Malley, of the district, has sent out a 
warning against fake collectors. 



TINNEY TO SERVE WILSON 

Fbeepobt, L. I.. June 19. — It was said 
here to-day that Frank Tinney has joined 
the naval reserve and has been assigned to 
duty on the Mayflower, President Wilson's 
yacht, by Secretary Daniels. 

Tinney attempted to enlist several weeks 
ago at the recruiting station in Twenty- 
third Street, but was told his services 
would be more valuable as a recruiting 
ballyhoo. Since then Tinney has made 
several trips to Washington, and be an- 
nounced later that he expects to be in one 
of Uncle Sam's uniforms within the next 
three weeks.. 



SELZNICK AFTER TANGUAY 

Arrangements have been practically 
completed whereby Harry Weber and 
Lewis J. Selznick are to star Eva Tan- 
guay in at least one motion picture. Ne- 
gotiations have been nnder way for the 
past few days, and the parties to the ar- 
rangement have bad various conferences. 
It is not known what title will be given 
the production, but Mr. Selznick will dis- 
tribute it. Julius Steger is being con- 
sidered to direct the picture. 

AUTO BANDITS ROB MANAGER 

Detboit, Mich., Jnne 13. — Manager 
Charles G. Williams, of the Temple Thea- 
tre, was assaulted by three auto-bandits 
to-day and robbed of $2,500. Williams had 
just drawn the money from the bank and 
was entering the stage door when he was 
attacked by the men with billies. The 
bandits made a getaway and the only clue 
the police have is the license number of 
the antomobile. 



BEACH MUSIC HALL BOOKED 
Arrangements have been consummated 
with the Brighton Beach Music Hall for 
the presentation of D. W. Griffith's spec- 
tacle "The Birth of a Nation" at that 
theatre for a limited summer engagement 
beginning Friday night, June 29. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 



CORT DEFEATS 
HEILIG IN ONE 
WEEITS_FIGHT 

NEW CORPORATION IS FORMED 



With the filing of incorporation papers 
of the Northwestern Theatrical Association 
in New York, instead of in Oregon, in the 
office of the Secretary of State at Albany, 
last Saturday, the fight for control of 
the Western theatrical field that started 
the previous Sunday between John Cort 
and Calvin Heilig, of Portland, Ore., came 
to an end. The officers of the New York 
corporation are John Cort, president and 
general manager ; J. E. Cort, vice-president ; 
J. J. Shubert, treasurer, and Calvin Heilig, 
secretary. Heilig was formerly president 
of the Oregon corporation. 

The Northwestern Circuit, which books 
over one hundred theatres through the 
Northwest, has been supplied with Shubert 
and Klaw & Erlanger attractions through 
its general manager, John Cort, since the 
"open door" fight seven yean ago. Dur- 
ing that period all of -these attractions have 
played Heilig's theatres in Tacoma and 
Portland. With the removal of Cort to 
New York a number of years ago, G. T. 
Hood was placed in charge of his Western 
offices in Seattle. 

It appears that about a month ago, 
Heilig informed a number of the man- 
agers of theatres on the circuit that Cort 
was no longer interested in the affairs of 
the circuit and was giving his entire time 
to the producing end of the business. Hei- 
lig felt that, through this so-called neglect 
on the part of Cort, there should be a 
change in the regime of the organization. 
He called a meeting of several of the 
managers of the Northwestern Association 
i jn May, and shortly afterward, at Salem, 
Ore., papers of incorporation of the Pacific 
Northwestern Theatrical Association, with 
a capital stock of $3,000, were filed. 

A few days later, Heilig entered the 
offices of the Northwestern Circuit, in 
Seattle, and informed Hood that be had 
taken charge of affairs and that Cort was 
out. Cort was communicated with at once 
and dispatched his son, Ed. Cort, who was 
travelling with the "Princess Pat" com- 
pany, to Seattle, to take charge of affairs. 
With him went several members of Mr. 
Corf s New York staff. 

When the younger Cort arrived, he im- 
mediately notified Heilig that he was in 
Seattle to protect his father's interests and 
that the affairs of the corporation would 
be taken care of by him. 

At that time, in Heilig's theatre, in 
Portland, were booked the following at- 
tractions, which were to play consecutive 
engagements beginning June 17 : "Flora 
Bella," "The Al. Jolson Show," "Very 
Good Eddie" and "The Masked Model" 
Cort immediately cancelled the engagements 
in this theatre and arranged to have them 
appear on those dates at the Baker Theatre, 
a stock house. 

This aroused the ire of Heilig and he 
immediately came to New York. He called 
upon the Shuberts and informed them that 
the managers of the West were through 
with Cort and that they had formed a new 
association. 

J. J. Shubert, however, informed Heilig 
that he was satisfied with the way Cort 
had handled the situation. He also in- 
formed Heilig that he had been in com- 
munication with the theatre owners of 
that section and that they too were satis- 
fied with the Cort regime. 

After this conference Mr. Shubert ar- 
ranged a meeting between Cort and Heilig 
at his office, when the matter was thor- 
oughly threshed out and an agreement tor 
the organization of the new corporation 
was made. Heilig requested that Cort 
cancel the bookings of the shows sched- 
uled to play the Baker this season and 
have them play his house instead. Cort, 
however, would not do this, claiming that 
Heilig should lose their dates. However, 
Cort agreed to reconsider the cancellation 
for the nineteen Shubert shows which 
were booked to play the house next season 
which finally satisfied Heilig. 



LUESCHER ARRANGING FETE 

A lawn fete, the proceeds of which will 
be equally distributed among the American 
Red Cross, the Aero Club of America, the 
United States Naval League and the 
American Ambulance Corps, will be held 
at the country home of Frederick E. 
Lewis, Jr., at Westport, Conn., on Satur- 
day, June 30. A mammoth vaudeville en- 
tertainment will be presented under the 
supervision of Mark A. Luescher, publicity 
purveyor of the Hippodrome. A number 
of prominent society women will assist 
Mr. Luescher, including Mrs. W. K. Van- 
derbilt, Jr., Mrs. F. E. Lewis, Jr., Mrs. 
Henry S. Glover, Mrs. H. L. ScheUing and 
Mrs. M. A. Luescher. 

Luescher is desirous of obtaining the 
services of several vaudeville and circus 
acts for the performance, and those who 
axe desirous of volunteering their services 
can obtain full information about the af- 
fair from him at the Hippodrome public- 
ity department. 

LAY "TURN TO RIGHT* PLANS 

Golden and Smith's "Turn to the 
Right" company, which has been playing 
in the Gaiety Theatre since Aug. 17, last, 
will remajn at the house until the end of 
August. At that time, the company will 
go to Boston, where it will begin an en- 
gagement at the Tremont Theatre Sept. 
1. The Chicago company, which began its 
engagement at Cohan's Grand Opera 
House on Jan. 14, will remain there for 
the balance of the summer. The Aus- 
tralian company, which recently com- 
pleted its engagement at Melbourne, 
started last week upon an unlimited en- 
gagement in Sydney. The producers have 
decided to hold the English rights of the 
play until after the conclusion of the 
war, when they will produce it there. 



6,000 MUSICIANS 

SEEK MORE 

WAGES 

ALL THEATRES ARE AFFECTED 



LOCAL 35 HONORS WILLIAMS 

Harold Williams, who took the office of 
president of Local No. 35, I. A. T. S. E. 
& M. P. O. of U. S. & C. last Sunday, was 
presented with a gold chain and diamond 
locket by the members as a token of 
esteem for his services as organizer and 
business agent of the union for the last 
five years. After the gift was made, 
Williams, in a speech, informed the mem- 
bers that, on Monday, he would assume 
the office of organizer on the staff of 
Chas. E. Shay, international president of 
the organization. He stated that he 
would not neglect Local 35 through this 
work and that he would also continue 
his activities as head of the Theatrical 
Federation of Greater New York. 



HIP REHEARSALS START SOON 

Rehearsals of the show for the New 
York Hippodrome will commence about 
July 1, under the direction of R. H. Burn- 
side. It is expected to have the show in 
shape for an opening early in August. 
After this work is completed, Bumside 
will commence work on a new production 
in which Chas. B. Dillingham will star 
Fred Stone next season. 



LEWIS TO HEAD STOCK CO. 

Henry Lewis will temporarily desert 
vaudeville at the end of this week and 
utilize the Summer as a stock actor at 
Rorick Glens Park, in the suburbs of El- 
mira. He win appear with the resident 
musical comedy stock actors there in re- 
vivals of Broadway successes and will play 
roles of the Joseph Cawthorne, Louis Mann 
and Sam Bernard type. 



LEVY TO HERALD SHOW 

Arthur "Cane" Levy has been engaged 
by Louis Mann to do the advance work 
for Sam Shipman's new play, "The Man 
Pays." which will have its initial per- 
formance at either Atlantic City or Wash- 
ington on July 2. Levy, at present, is 
handling the publicity for the Junior 
Naval Reserves Fair. 



The question of a general increase of 
wages for the musicians playing in New 
York theatres is being taken up at the 
annnal conference of the Mutual Musical 
Protective Union, at 210 East 86th Street, 
during sessions which have been going on 
since last Wednesday and will continue un- 
til July L This organization, which has 
about 6,000 members, feels that, on ac- 
count of living conditions its members, who 
have not had an increase in wages in* 
eighteen years, should receive more money. 

The organization, it is said, is the only 
one affiliated with the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, which has the right to 
adjust its wage scale without conferring 
with managers. Some of the more radical 
of the members want to take advantage of 
this condition and have tried to rush 
through a scale of wages which would be 
prohibitive. However, the cooler heads in 
the organization have been able to show 
them the inadvisability of this move and 
have persuaded them to arrange a more 
reasonable scale for submission to the man- 
agers. The latter seem to feel that the 
demands are a little more than they can 
afford at present, and have asked the men 
to reconsider their request. 

It is said that when word of the man- 
agers' attitude was carried back to these 
members some of them were insistent upon 
calling a general strike in all houses. How- 
ever, other union men heard of their in- 
tentions and immediately got into touch 
with them, pointing out that, with the coun- 
try at war, actions of this sort would be 
injurious to union conditions in general. 

The scale of wages submitted by the 
musicians calls for an increase from $33 
a week to' $40 a week for all men playing 
fourteen shows in first-class vaudeville 
houses. For those playing twelve shows, 
an increase from $27 a week to $33.50 a 
week is asked. 

In the vaudeville and picture houses, 
where the admission fee is not above twen- 
ty-five cents, they will allow the same 
scale of wages, $28 a week for seven days, 
to prevail, but the working time is to be 
six and one-half instead of seven and one- 
half hours daily. 

In houses where they do not charge 
more than $1 admission, such as the Rialto, 
Strand and burlesque theatres, where the 
scale at present is $38.50 a week, $42 a 
week is desired. In the houses where more 
than $1 is charged for admission, the scale 
is to be increased from $42 to $45 a week. 

The musical comedy houses which give 
eight performances a week are now paying 
$30 salary. But the union, under its pro- 
visions, wants an increase of from $32 to 
$40 a week, to be gauged on a sliding scale 
as to the length of time the attraction is in 
the theatre. 

The Winter Garden, at which nine shows 
are given weekly, win be asked to increase 
the salaries of the men from $37 to $42 
a week on account of the Sunday perform- 
ances. The theatres which are housing 
dramatic productions that engage their or- 
chestras by the season, pay a flat wage of 
$24 a week. Up to date, no increase has 
been asked for the men in these houses. 

The officers of the Union who are in 
attendance at these meetings are D. Ed- 
ward Porter, president; S. Finklestein, 
vice-president ; Isaac Rosenberg, treasurer ; 
Frank Evans, secretary, and George 
Schroeder and Nicholas Briglio of the 
Board of Governors. 

If the scale is put into effect, it will 
commence to operate September 1 in the 
vaudeville houses and August 1 in the 
other theatres. 



MOORE AGAIN HEADS LIGHTS 
At the annual election of officers of 
the Lights, at Freeport last Thursday, 
the following were elected for the ensuing 
term, without contest: Angel, Victor 
Moore; Vice-President, Harry Bulger; 
firmnniiil secretary, H. E. Manwaring; re- 
cording secretary, Fritz Tidden; treas- 
urer, Frank Kaufman. Robert H. Hodge 
was originally slated for the office of finan- 
cial secretary but, after being criticized for 
having invited Harry Mountford to the 
opening of the club the week previous, he 
withdrew from the ticket, and Manwaring 
was nominated in his stead. 



LONG TO PILOT "PRETTY BABY" 

The 1918 edition of "Pretty Baby" win 
open its season at Cleveland on August 6 
with the same cast that was seen on the 
International Circuit last season. Claude 
H. Long, the agent, win pilot the company. 



"SPEEDWAY GIRLS" SIGN BLACKS 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Black (Sue Mil- 
ford), have signed to go with "The Speed- 
way Girls" for the coming season, as pro- 
ducer and soubrette. 



MILTON BUYS SUMMER PLACE 

George W. Milton and Jennie Delmar 
have completed arrangements for the pur- 
chase of a Summer home at Freeport, 
L. L 



WHERE IS MARIE KENT? 

Inquiry is being made through The 
Cltppeb concerning Marie Kent whose two 
children. Paul and Elinore. died in Mis- 
souri, in 1912. 



SET BURLESQUE STANDS 

1 (Continued from page 3.) 
Newark, and Bowerys, Casino, Brooklyn. 
Those of the shows which win play 
preliminary engagements are: The Sport- 
ing Widows, 20th Century Maids, Harry ■ 
Hastings' Big Show, Liberty Girls, Star 
and Garter, Oh Girl, Bostonians, Golden 
Crooks, Bon Tons, Ben Welch, Singer 
Show, Hello America, Million Dollar Dolls, 
Roseland Girls, Irwin's Majesties, Merry 
Rounders, Social Maids (Hurtig & Sea- 
mon's Aug. 6) ; Burlesque Wonder Show, 
Burlesque Revue and the Bowerys, who 
open the Columbia preliminary season 
Ang. 6. 

The week lay off between Harlem and 
Paterson will follow Hurtig & ' Seamon's 
and Miner's Bronx alternatively. 

To foUow the route of a show during 
the season read up in the list of towns. 
The houses and towns that have been 
selected for the American Circuit follow: 
Gaiety, Brooklyn; Warburton, Yonkers 
(Mon. Tues. and Wed.) ; Hudson, Schenec- 
tady (Thurs., Fri. and Sat.); Holyoke, 
Holyoke (Mon. and Tues.); Gilmore, 
Springfield (Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat.) ; 
Howard, Boston; Orpheum, New Bedford 
(Mon., Tues., Wed.); Worcester, Worces- 
ter, Mass. (Thurs., Fri. and Sat.) ; Olym- 
pic, New York; alternating Gaiety and 
Trocedero, Philadelphia; Majestic, Scran- 
ton; Armory, Binghamton (Mon. and 
Tues.) ; Richardson, Oswego, N. Y. 
(Wed.) ; International, Niagara Falls 
(Thurs., Fri., Sat.) ; Garden, Buffalo; Star, 
Toronto; Savoy, Hamilton; Cadillac, De- 
troit; Gayety, Chicago; Gayety, MUwau- 
kee; Gayety, Minneapolis; Star, St. Paul; 
Lyceum, Duluth (Sun.), open the balance 
of the week; Century, Kansas City; 
Standard, St. Louis; Englewood, Chicago; 
Empire, Chicago; Majestic, Fort Wayne 
(Sun.) ; Majestic, Indianapolis, balance of 
the week; Buckingham, Louisville; Ly- 
ceum, Columbus; Court, Wheeling (Mon., 
Tues., Wed.); Grand, Akron, O. (Thurs., 
Fri.. Sat.); Empire, Cleveland; Park, 
Erie (Mon., Tues.) ; Majestic, Ashtabula 
(Wed.) ; Park, Youngstown (Thurs., Fri., 
Sat.) ; Victoria, Pittsburgh; Lyceum, 
Beaver Falls, Pa. (Mon.) ; Cambria, Johns- 
town (Tues.) ; Wednesday open unless Al- 
toona is taken in; Orpheum, Harrisburg 
(Thurs.) ; Orpheum, York (Fri.) ; Academy 
of Music, Reading (Sat.); open week; 
Gayety, Baltimore; alternatively at Tro- 
cadero or Gaiety, Philadelphia. The fol- 
lowing week is split up between the Grand 
Opera House, South Bethlehem; Orpheum, 
F.aston, and Majestic, Wilkes-Barre ; Em- 
pire, Hoboken, and Star. Brooklyn. 

If the present schedule that is arranged 
for the shows is carried out the houses 
win be played in the running order run- 
ning up the list. 

Altoona, Pa., is the only town on the 
Penn Circuit not yet decided upon, owing 
to a misunderstanding, concerning the 
booking fee, which all the other towns 
have agreed to. 

The opening stands of the various 
shows on the American wheel wiU be 
announced later. 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



LAMBS GAMBOL MERRILY ON 
BROAD WAY'S L ONG GREEN 

Kg Annual Event, Held at Manhattan Opera House, Takes in 

$20,000 at First Performance; Many Stars 

in Blackface 



The Lambs' All-Star Gambol of 1917 
took place at the Manhattan Opera House 
on Sunday night and Monday afternoon, 
and it was well worth the time of the gal- 
axy of stars to "gambol," for almost $20,- 
000 was added to the coffers of the club 
through their Sunday night endeavor alone. 
About half of this amount was obtained at 
the Monday afternoon performance. 

The audience was almost entirely com- 
posed of theatrical celebrities and their 
friends, as the entertainment furnished by 
the Lambs is most keenly appreciated by 
the persons in "our set" along the Rialto. 
Willie Collier, naturally, had the dis- 
tinction of being "Collie," and it was up 
to him to set the show in motion. This 
was done in a one-act skit entitled, "Get- 
ting Up a Gambol," from the pen of George 
V. Hobart. The story was the usual one 
formed around the Lamb's grill room, when 
efforts are made to cast a "Gambol." All 
the members that could be squeezed onto 
the big stage of the Manhattan Opera 
House were worked into this scene, each 
wanting to help. No one seemed to want 
"just one small part" in Collier's gamboL 
Finally, everyone deserted him, with the 
exception of Barney Bernard, who prom- 
ised to play the part Collier had for him. 
Willie was gratified, and figured that all of 
Ms troubles were over, when he was in- 
formed that the prospective actor was not 
a Lamb at all, but just a pants-maker. 

Leon Errol then did a "drunk" waiter, 
offering to help Collier with a specialty as 
a wire walker. Collier was again satis- 
fied until Hobart entered and told the 
waiter that his services were no longer 
required at the club. Of course it was 
time then for the other members to stop 
kidding. They all entered and informed 
Willie that he need not worry. He would 
have a show. 

In the second spot, Will Rogers seemed 
to be perfectly at ease with his lariat 
stunts and stories. 

George Hobart's sketch, "Words Mean 
Nothing," with William J. Ferguson, Bran- 
don Tynan, Effingham Pinto and William 
Courtney in the cast, was next presented. 
The title was self-explanatory, as the au- 
dience, even fhough warned in advance by 
the program, could not comprehend what 
it was all about. That mattered little, 
for it was worth the time of any one to 
see Pinto in the feminine character. 

Van and Schenck were sandwiched in 
between this number and the minstrel first 
part and served to be a good filler. 

It certainly was a surprise to those pres- 
ent to glance over the program and see 
the complement of the minstrel cast. 
Many a "legit" wore "cork" for the first 
time and had to like it, too. Sixty of the 
Lambs sat around to lend atmosphere for 
the comedians. De Wolf Hopper and Fred 
Niblo served as the interlocutors. The end 
men were Willie Collier, Raymond Hitch- 
cock, Clifton Crawford, James T. Powers, 
Barney Bernard, Julius Tanean, Andrew 
Mack and Will Rogers. Doyle and Dixon 
acted as the card boys. 

Rogers proved to be the bit of the min- 
strel show. He wore a regalia a la Frank 
Tinney and seemed to use Tinney for the 
"butt" of most of his quips. 

Bernard & Tanean introduced two new 
blackface characters in the person of "Pot- 
ash and Pearlmntter." 

Crawford brought along a good Scotch 
dialect which seemed to amuse Raymond 
Hitchcock considerably. Hitchcock seemed 
to think he was working in his own show 
until the interlocutor told him he had no 
"chicken" support. 

Collier, as usual, was vgry near run- 
ning away with everything until Hopper 
informed him that there were other people 
In the show. 



The sight of Collier and Andrew Mack 
executing a soft shoe dance made quite a 
hit. 

Irving Berlin was credited with having 
written almost all of the numbers as far 
the announcement of the interlocutors went. 
Besides those above mentioned in the 
minstrel show were John Charles Thomas, 
John Slavin, Hal Forde, Fred Belcher, Al- 
fred Kappler, John Hendricks, Ben Burt, 
Robert Hosea, John Willard, Ned A 
Sparks, Bertram Marburgh, J. J. Ryan, 
Ralph Dean, Sam Wallach, Marcus Loew, 
Walter Craven, Robert Bentley, J. V. B. 
Bleecker, J. H. Livingston, Jr., Eddie 
Campbell, Frank Tours, Effingham Pinto, 
Harry McClaskey, Frank Croxton, Roy At- 
well, Harrison Buckbank, George L. 
Moore, John Parks, Louis Cassavant, 
George S. Christie, Frank Mayne, Stephen 
Maley, Edgar Nelson, Aubrey Beattie, D. 
C. Leeper, Richard Neil, Ed. Flammer, 
Fred Esmelton; Sam Coit, John Haas, 
Henry Mortimer, Adin Wilson, Chas. E. 
Evans, Maclyn Arbuckle, Billie Taylor, 
Lawrence Wheat, Rapley Holmes, Tom 
Conkey, Ernest Torrence, Frank Hannah, 
Earl Benham, Fred Lewis, George O'Don- 
nell, Walter Horton, Frank O'Day, Robert 
Middlemas, James Harrod, Sam Ash, Tom. 
McGrath, George Curzon, George Romaine, 
John Brownell and John Ravold. 

"Somewhere in Mexica," a sketch by 
Robert Mears Mackey, opened the second 
part of the entertainment. The sketch was 
well presented, and, if it were not for the 
theme, might have the same vaudeville 
possibilities which previous Lambs' offer- 
ings have had. Those who appeared in 
the playlet were, John Sainpolis, Macey 
Harlen, Ralph Dean, George E. Mack, Roy 
FairchUd and Donald Brian. 

Doyle and Dixon appeared in their dance 
offering, which seemed to please immensely. 
John McConnack. scheduled for three 
selections, was compelled to render two 
more numbers before the audience would 
permit him to leave the stage. He ap- 
peared at the Sunday night performance 
only. His numbers were, "Ah! Moon of 
My Delight," "In Dublin's Fair City," "The 
Trumpeter," "Mother Machree," and "I 
Hear Ton Calling Me." 

George White gave imitations of all the 
popular dancers as bis share of the work 
of the evening. 

"The Old Stage Door," which was com- 
posed, gathered or assembled by William 
Collier and John L. Golden, was presented 
by John Hendricks, Effingham Pinto, 
George Howell, Andrew Mack, Leon Er- 
rol, Ignatio Martinetti, William Collier, 
Ernest Truek, Clifton Crawford, Richard 
Tabor and Donald Brian. It portrayed the 
characters of ladies and gentlemen of the 
stage in days gone by. This offering ap- 
peared to be the hit of the show. 

The performance concluded after a dura- 
tion of four and one-half hours with "The 
Flag Storm," a patriotic spectacle in which 
De Wolf Hopper was surrounded by more 
than 100 Junior Naval Reserves with their 
band and a host of Lambs singing Presi- 
dent Wilson's words, "Fall Into Line for 
Your Motherland," set into song by John L. 
Golden. At the conclusion of the song, a 
drop, disclosing the countenance of the 
President, was lowered amid cheers from 
all parts of the house. 

Those ladies of the Stage who sold pro- 
grams were Miss Bijou Fernandez, Min- 
nette Barrett, Lillian Beckwith, Geraldine 
Bergh, Edna Courtleigh. Marion Davies, 
Reine Davies, Madeline Delmar, Josephine 
Drake, Louise Drew, Louise Dresser. Mar- 
garet Greene, Jane Grey. Edith Hallor. 
Winifred Harris. Selma Hirchberg, Mrs. 
De Wolf Hopper, Mary Evelyn Jones, 
Gilda Leary, Mrs. George McManus, Mary 
Jane Outeault Myrtle Tannebill, Mrs. Er- 
nest Torrence, Ivy Troutman. Antoinette 
Walker and Mrs. Sam Wallach. 



N. Y. STAGE CREWS TO SEEK RAISE 

Efforts will be made shortly by the 
Theatrical Protective Union No. 1, of New 
York, to obtain an increase of $5 per week 
for the heads of mechanical departments in 
New York theatres. This increase will 
only be sought for the electricians, car- 
penters and property-men. 

A wage scale, which is said to ask for 
$35 a week for carpenters, instead of $30, 
for six days, and $30 a week for property- 
men and electricians for the same period 
of time, is being drawn up and will be 
submitted to the members for a referen- 
dum at the next meeting. If it ia favorably 
acted upon, it will then be submitted to 
the managers and, if acceptable, will be- 
come effective September 1. In those 
houses which operate seven days, an addi- 
tional $5 per week will be asked for the 
extra day. 



SAYS ACTOR CAN'T USE PRESS 
What is considered to be an unusual 
decision and one which should prove of 
interest to performers, has been handed 
down by Judge Guy, of the Supreme Court, 
in the case of Henry E. Dixie against the 
Punch and Judy Theatre Company. The 
Court held that a contract between a 
performer and a producer implies that the 
performer shall not solicit or obtain any 
publicity on his own account, but that 
all publicity shall go through the bands of 
the publicity representative of the pro- 
ducer. Even though this is not stipulated 
in the contract, the Court holds that the 
obtaining of publicity through the per- 
former's own initiative holds him open to 
immediate dismissal. 



CARVILL LOSES SUIT 

The Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court last week decided against Henry 
Carvill, the actor, in bis suit against 
the Mirror Film Co. to collect $1,000, re- 
versing the decision of the Appellate Term, 
which awarded the judgment. The decision 
was reversed on the ground that he bad 
compromised his case by assigning part 
of his claim against the Mirror Films to 
another person, who had sued and obtained 
$600 on a judgment against the picture 
company. Carvill claimed to have a con- 
tract for a year's work at a salary of 
$100 a week, but alleged he had been 
discharged without cause after three weeks' 
work. 



HAWKES KNEW WHAT TO DO 

When Wells Hawkes, the press agent, 
recently took the examination for Lieu- 
tenant in the Quartermaster's Department 
of the Navy, the examining officer put 
him through a long list of questions. 
Finally he wanted to know what Hawkes 
would do were he on board a ship that 
was torpedoed while in charge of the pay- 
roll of the Quartermaster's Department 
Hawkes thought a moment, scratched his 
head and then promptly replied : 

"Grab the bankroll and jump overboard, 
sir!" 

"You'll do," said the officer and signed 
the application. 



WILLIAMS SETTLES CASE 

The snit brought by John Williams 
against the World Costume Corporation 
has been adjusted for $200. Harry Saks 
Hechheimer was attorney for plaintiff, and 
Maurice Kutner represented the defendant. 
The case grew ont of the purchase, by 
Williams, of some costumes from the 
World Corporation, be later charging the 
costumers with breach of contract. 



SAVAGE TRYING NEW OPERA 

Hartford, Conn., June 15. — Henry W. 
Savage will present Mitzi Hajos in a new 
comic opera surrounded by the Opera Play- 
ers, of this city, next week. The stock 
company, under the personal management 
of H. C. Parsons, is enjoying the most 
emphatic success ever attained in Hart- 
ford. 



LA PEARL TO PLAY FILM ROLE 

Harry La Pearl, the clown, has been 
engaged to play a role in the Goldwyn 
picture, "Polly o' the Circus," featuring 
Mae March. The feature is being taken 
under the direction of Charles Horan. 



GRAN LUND AWAY ON TRIP 
N. T. Granlund. director of Publicity 
for the Loew theatres, left last week to 
visit the Southern chain of houses in At- 
lanta, Birmingham and Memphis. He is 
inaugurating a new publicity "stunt" of 
having motion picture stars appear in per- 
son at these bouses. The first of the stars 
to appear is Violet Mersereau, of the Uni- 
versal, who, accompanied by her mother, 
made the trip South with Granlund. Her 
visit will last ten days. 



EDWARD F. RUSH RORRED 

Some thief who has been admiring the 
silk shirts worn by Edward F. Rush, the 
producer, got them last week by simply 
going to the dumbwaiter shaft of the 
apartment house in which Mr. Rush lives 
and, after summoning the Rush maid, 
shouting up that he was the Iaundryman. 
She gave them to him, and it was only 
when the regular Iaundryman came that 
the theft was discovered. 



ACQUIRE THIRD HOUSE 

Steiner, Weisner & Schwartz, who are 
operating the new Fourteenth Street The- 
atre, and the American Theatre on Third 
Street, will add the third link to their 
chain of houses next Saturday when they 
open the Sunset Theatre, in East Houston 
Street The house will have a feature 
picture policy. 



T1ERNEY WRITING MOROSCO PIECE 

A new musical play, in which Blanche 
Ring is to be starred, is being written by 
Oliver Morosco and Elmer Harris. Harry 
Tierney is composing the music. Among 
those, who will support Miss Ring are 
Charles Wininger, Dainty Marie and Flani- 
gan and Edwards. 



DOTTIE RAY GREENE A MOTHER 

Philadelphia, June 16. — A baby 
daughter named Margaret Mary was born 
to Dottie Ray Greene Monday at the Medl- 
co-Chirurgical Hospital. Miss Greene in 
private life ia the wife of James B. Rourke, 
well known in the profession as a musical 
director. 



BROWN BUYS BONDS 
Chamberlain Brown bas purchased Lib- 
erty Bonds for himself and the following 
numbers of bis office staff: Harry Staf- 
ford, Lyman Brown, Rose Mnlleany and 
H. J. Van VTiet. He also bought a bond 
for his mother, Mrs. Delorious Brown. 



WOLFE TO BOOK PIER 

Frank Wolfe, of the Nixon-Nirdllnger 
offices in Philadelphia, will book the vaude- 
ville talent for Ocean Pier, WOdwood, N. 
J., which will inaugurate its summer sea- 
son on July 2. Six acts and a feature 
picture will be offered. 



CELEBRATE DOUBLE ANNIVERSARY 

Hartford, Conn., June 15. — Lost week 
a double anniversary took place here when 
the Palace Theatre celebrated its third 
year of prosperity, and William D. As- 
congh, the manager, observed his forty- 
fourth as an American citizen. 



JOE PHILLIPS HAS NEW ACT 

Joe Phillips, the former burlesque come- 
dian, and Cissy Hines, are doing a new 
vaudeville act and will open their engage- 
ment on the B. S. Moss Circuit at the 
Prospect Theatre, Bronx, next Monday. 

BEARD SIGNS WITH FIELD 

Billy Beard bas signed for next season 
as principal comedian with the AI. O. 
Field Minstrels. This marks his return to 
burnt cork after appearing eight years in 
white face. 



ACTOR GETS FIFTEEN DAYS 

Justices Herbert, Freschi and Moss, in 
Special Sessions, on Monday, sentenced 
Perrival Hugging, an actor, to fifteen days 
in jail for driving an automobile wbile in 
an intoxicated condition. 



WALTER KMGSLEY IS WELL AGAIN 

Walter Kingsley, press agent for the 
Palace Theatre, has recovered from an 
attack of ptomaine poisoning which in- 
capacitated him for several days. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 




ACCUSED AGENT ARRESTED 

FOR ATTEMP TED SUICIDE 

Charles M. Blanchard Locked Up Charged with Taking Poison, 
When Adjournment of Case Against Him for Operat- 
ing Without License Is Denied 



Charles M. Blanchard, the vaudeville 
agent, was locked tip last Friday charged 
with making an attempt at suicide by 
taking poison. He was held by the police 
until Saturday, when he was discharged. 

The reason for the attempt was prob- 
ably due to a general nervous condition 
from which he has been suffering of late, 
and to aggravated worriment over an ac- 
cusation which has been hanging over his 
head for many months. It is said that 
Blanchard was greatly worried as to its 
outcome. 

Some time ago J. Wallace Clinton com- 
plained to the city department of licenses 
that Blanchard, representing himself as 
a vaudeville agent, had promised to get 
him work, and, on the strength of the 
promise, had received a substantial 
amount from Clinton. No work, however, 
was given, the complainant alleges. 

Upon his complaint to the license de- 
partment, the case was speedily brought 
to trial in the magistrate's court, where 
Blanchard was charged with operating 
without an agent's license and held for 
Special Sessions. 

The case haB dragged along in the lat- 
ter court for a considerable length of 



time, but promised to be disposed of 
finally last week. However, owing to the 
absence of a material witness, it was 
necessary to declare another postpone- 
ment, although Attorney James S. Klein- 
man, representing the license department, 
claims that it will be pressed to trial 
within a few days. 

When the case was called last week 
Blanchard's attorney, Harry Saks Heci- 
heimer, announced to the Court that his 
client had paid back the amount of money 
to Clinton and asked therefore that the 
case be adjourned. The Court, however, 
denied the motion, and it is thought that 
when Blanchard saw this last straw taken 
away he worried more than ever and be- 
came mentally unbalanced. 

Another very similar action is now 
being waged by the license department 
against William Thompson. Two per- 
formers appeared in the Magistrate's 
Court to testify against Thompson for 
taking money from them and not get- 
ting them employment. They were Wil- 
liam Vander Trien of the "Apollo Trio," 
and Alfred Ermacher, a motion picture 
actor. Thompson is now being held for 
trial in Special Sessions. 



SANTLEY CHANGES NAME 

Joseph Santley can now legally claim 
that name, as be has been granted per- 
mission by Justice Greenbaum, changing 
from the name of Joseph Mansfield. 



JOE DANIELS IN ACCIDENT 

Boston, June 16. — Joe Daniels, mono- 
logise, narrowly escaped being killed as the 
result of an accident he met with while 
riding in an automobile, that necessitated 
six stiehes being taken over his left eye. 
He is now at his home here. 



SELLS "ALL WRONG" RIGHTS 

Frances Nordstrom has sold the English 
and Irish rights of her sketch, "All 
Wrong," to Albert Whelan. Miss Nords- 
trom has just terminated a tour on the 
Orpheum time in order to be able to attend 
rehearsals of her play, "He Said and She 
Believed Him," to be produced by John 
Craig and Lee Shubert early this Autumn. 



BRIGHTON PRESENTS BIG BILL 

The ninth anniversary of the opening 
of the New Brighton Theatre, at Brighton 
Beach, is being celebrated this week by 
Manager George Robinson, who is pre- 
senting a strong bill, including Henry 
Lewis, in "a Vaudeville Pousse Cafe" : 
Nan Halperin (second week), B. A. 
Rolfe's "Rubcville," Bert Baker, George 
Rockwell and Al. Wood, Una, with a 
corps de ballet; Ray and Gordon Dooley, 
Martin Brernan and Ethel Powell, Chinko 
and Minnie Kaufman, and the Eddy Duo. 



THE BERRENS SPLIT 

Herman and Freddie Berrens have sev- 
ered their partnership as a vaudeville team 
and will each do a single next season. Both 
acts are being written by Herbert Moore. 



"SUBMARINE F-7" OPENS AUG. 26 
The vaudeville offering "Submarine F.7," 
which has been given a route over the 
Orpheum Circuit, win commence its en- 
gagement at the Orpheum Theatre, Des 
Moines, on August 26. 



MAARCKS UONS BOOKED 

A route over the Orpheum Circuit has 
been given Maarck's Lions and the act will 
commence its tour at the Majestic Theatre, 
Chicago, on August 5. It will play 
eighteen weeks. 



BUSHWICK OFFERS GOOD BILL 

The Bushwick Theatre offers a good 
bill this week, which includes Dorothy 
Jardon, Ben Welch, Billie Reeves, the 
Watson Sisters, the Kaufman Brothers, 
Bertee Beaumont and Jack Arnold, Row- 
ley and Young, Helena Jackley and Ster- 
ling and Marguerite. 



BOOKERS BOOK RECRUITS 

Joe Levy and George Sofranski, the 
booking agents, who are members of the 
Quartermaster's Department detailed at the 
State Arsenal, are still active in their 
efforts to book talent for Uncle Sam. Last 
week they obtained, on a pay or play 
contract, the following recruits. Jack 
Grossman, a cabaret performer ; Sammy 
Weston, of Weston & Clare ; Harry Pauli, 
of Millington & Pauli ; Jack Crisp, of The 
Crisps, and Lew Eisenberg. They claim 
that three or four agents now booking 
in the Loew offices will join their ranks 
within the nest week. 



LEASE OCEAN PIERS FOR VAUDE. 
Abe I. Feinberg. associated with Frank 
Wolfe, of the Nixon-Nirdlinger offices, 
Philadelphia, who recently secured Ocean 
Pier, Ocean City, N. J.. Has also taken 
Ocean Pier, Wildwood. N. J., and will pre- 
sent vaudeville and pictures during the 
Summer at both houses. The pier at Ocean 
City will be re-named the Hippodrome and 
will begin its season next Monday. Ocean 
Pier, Wildwood, will open on or about July 
L 

GREEN SECURES NEW ACT 

Cliffo rd Green will be seen next season 
in "What Is the Use?" a new act written 
for him by Sam Morris. 



DOOLEY AND RUGGLE MARRY 

John Dooley and Yvette Ruggle, of 
"The Passing Show of 1917," took a fly- 
ing trip to Philadelphia last Friday, were 
married and returned to New York in 
time for the night performance. 



DAISY JEAN AT WEDDING 

Daisy Jean attended the recent wedding 
in New York of Mrs. Irene Angela Miersch, 
widow of Johannes Miersch, violinist, of 
Cincinnati, and Dr. Armitage Baber, of 
Dayton, O. 



HALE Sc PATTERSON ADD BAND 

Hale and Patterson have formed a com- 
bination with the Jazz Band of Reisen- 
weber's and will open on the Orpheum 
Circuit late in August. 



MISS WELLMAN CHOOSES CAST 

Emily Ann Wellman has engaged E. A. 
Turner for the leading male role in the 
flash drama, "Young Mrs. Stanford," 
which will tonr the Orpheum circuit next 
season. Winifred Burke will return to 
the cast. 



SAMMY WESTON AIDS HIS UNCLE 
Sammy Weston, of Weston and Clare, 
is now serving the government . in die 
Quartermaster's Division at the Arsenal 
at Thirty-fifth Street and Seventh Ave- 
nue, where he 'will be employed until the 
finish of the war. 



SKIPPER AND KASTRUP BOOKED 

Skipper and Kastrup are booked over 
the Pantages Circuit opening at Milwau- 
kee, August 16. They will play in the 
East, appearing at the Riverside Theatre, 
and other Keith theatres, until early in 
August 



MUSICAL NOSSES WIN SUIT 
The Six Musical Nosses were last week 
granted $950 in their suit against the Ho- 
tel Shelburne, Inc., in which they charged 
they bad been engaged for ten weeks and 
had played only fonr. They said they had 
been damaged to the extent of $1,500. 



CONUN LOSES FATHER 

William Conlin, aged 84, died at his 
home in Lancaster, Pa., June 12, after a 
short illness. The deceased was the father 
of James' P. Conlin of the Conlin and 
Parks Trio act 



ACTS SAIL FOR BUENOS AIRES 

Robert Baffin, with his Monkey Hippo- 
drome, the Emilie Sisters, aerial trapeze 
act; James Higgins, high jumper; Cap- 
laine and Wells, novelty juggling act and 
Norah May, American singer, sailed last 
week for Buenos Ayres to tonr the Carlos 
Sequin Circuit. 



TAKE OVER MOSS HOUSE FOR DAY 

B. S. Moss' Flatbush Theatre will be 
taken over on Thursday, June 28, by the 
Flatbush Chamber of Commerce with a 
view to raising funds for the purchase of 
an ambulance which will represent Flat- 
bush's part in the war. Seats will sell, 
in fact, most of them have already been 
sold, at a scale running from $1 to $5. 

Presided over by Frank S. Staniland, 
president of the Chamber of Commerce 
and Hans J. Gerlich, chairman of the 
ambulance fund committee, an auction sale 
of the box seats was held at the Cortelyon 
Club last Saturday evening, and Mr. Moss 
bought the lower left stage box for $75. 
A specially augmented program of star 
acts will signalize the occasion, and all 
Flatbush, led by the 18th Assembly Dis- 
trict Republican Club, fife, drum and 
bugle corps, with Major Newland in com- 
mand, will attend. 



FEINBERG HAS NEW ACT 

"On the Firing Lone" is the title of a 
spectacular sketch which Abe Feinberg 
is presenting the first half of this week 
at Keeney's Theatre, New Britain, Conn. 
The sketch is an intimate story of life in 
the trenches and is said to have been 
written by a man who just returned from 
France. There are four people in the 
act. When it is whipped into shape it 
will be seen on the Fox circuit. 



ORPHEUM IS CLOSED 

The Orphenm Theatre, Brooklyn, closed 
for the season last Sunday night and the 
Colonial Theatre will close for the Sum- 
mer this week. • • 



BURLESQUERS FORM TEAM 

Maude Rockwell, the burlesque prima 
donna, and Walter Pearson, are appear- 
ing in a vaudeville act during the Summer 
months. They are playing the neighbor- 
hood theatres. 



START AUTOMOBILE TRIP 

Hugo Morris, Maurice Rose and Mr. 
and Mrs. Splngold left by automobile for 
Chicago over the Philadelphia route, Sat- 
urday. They will • '•» Chicago two 



BAILEY HAS SUMMER JOB 

Harry Bailey, - who has been managing 
the Alhambra Theatre, will guide the 
vaudeville policy of the Blakely Theatre, 
Wildwood, New Jersey, during the Summer 
season. He will take up his duties July 2. 



MATHEWS & JOLSON MAY JOIN 

It seems very probable at this writing, 
that Bob Mathews and Harry Jolson will 
be seen in a two men comedy act in "one" 
the coming season. 



BEATRICE NOYES GETS PLAYLET 

Beatrice Noyes, late of "Mile-a-Minute 
Kendall," has begun rehearsals for a play- 
let in which she will portray the role of 
a Bowery waif. 



IRENE FRANKLIN HONORED 

The Twelfth Night Club gave a. luncheon 
last Friday in honor of Irene Franklin, 
now appearing in "The Passing Show of 
1917," at the Winter Garden. 



CHICAGO AGENTS MOTOR HERE 

Irving Tischner, Sammy Tischner, Will 
Jacobs and Lew Goldberg, Chicago, vaude- 
ville agents, are in this city for a two 
weeks' visit. They made the trip from the 
West in Goldberg's automobile. 



TENNESSEE TEN IN REVUE 

The Tennessee Ten, Harry and Eva 
Puck, Mary Lavar, The Dancing St Claire 
and Friedken'g Russian Troupe, have been 
engaged as principals for tbe Revue, un- 
der the direction of Andree and Sberri, at 
the New Brighton Hotel, commencing 
June 29. 

MACDOWELL JOINS TRIANGLE 

The news that Melbourne Macdowell has 
become a member of the Triangle stock 
company, at Culver City, should prove of 
unusual interest to those screen fans who 
also recall the striking impersonations 
that this actor contributed to the legiti- 
mate stage in years past. 

With his wife, the late Fanny Daven- 
port, one of the most celebrated American 
tragediennes of the last generation, Mac-' 
dowell appeared in many classic produc- 
tions. His best-known roles were Marc 
Antony, in "Julius Caesar" : Scarpia, in 
"La Tosca" ; Loris Ipanoff, in "Fedora" ; 
Almerio, in "Gismonda," and Andreas in 
"Theodora Virginius." 

GUARD FILMS, SAYS IRWIN 
Walter W. Irwin, general manager of 
V-L-S-E, has issued a warning to the 
motion picture interests of the entire coun- 
try to take every precaution to safeguard 
all films against damage by persons in 
the employ of the German Government. 
Tbe warning comes as a result of the 
arrest of George Hann, who had been act- 
ing as an operator at the Windameer 
Theatre, East Cleveland, Ohio, who is be- 
ing held under ten thousand dollars' bail 
as an alien enemy after approximately two 
hundred matches had been found in the 
shipping ease containing the reels of 
"Womanhood, 'the Glory of the Nation," 
Greater Yitagraph'a big preparedness spec- 
tacle. •- - 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




RIVERSIDE 

Mclntyre and Heath in the first half and 
Gross and Josephine in the second were 
the big hits of the bill at this theatre 
Monday afternoon and, in spite of the fact 
that this is mid-Summer, when enthusi- 
asm is at its lowest ebb in the vaudeville 
houses, both acts were applauded to the 
echo. 

Olga Mishka and Company, assisted by 
Eugene Santo, a talented violinist, opened 
the show, although they could easily have 
held a position much farther down on the 
bill. Miss Mishka is a most graceful 
dancer and her repertoire of classic and 
modern dances was finely presented. The 
violinist is a good musician and, in the 
orchestra pit, renders two numbers ex- 
cellently. 

Florrie Millership, in number two spot 
sang four songs cleverly and brought her 
act to a strong finish with a dance which 
pleased greatly. 

Frances Nordstrom and William Pink- 
barn's sketch "All Wrong," which has been 
seen in almost all the vaudeville houses in 
and around New York, has a strong com- 
edy element and aroused considerable 
laughter. The story of the wife who 
thought her husband too quiet and prosaic 
and, on this account, was dissatisfied with 
wedded life, only to suddenly discover that 
he is a thief and a murderer, seemed to 
strike a responsive note in many of those 
present on Monday. Miss Nordstrom, by 
playing the role of the wife more quietly, 
-would, in the opinion of this reviewer, 
meet with more success. 

Harry Carroll is singing a number of 
his new songs as well as a medley of the 
old ones. Two of the new songs are of a 
patriotic nature, which got him consider- 
able applause. His voice, however, is not 
improving with age. On the contrary, it 
seemed to be thinner and more unmusical 
than ever. A good singing voice is a gift, 
and if one happens to be born without 
one, it can never be acquired. One can 
always learn correct pronunciation, how- 
ever, which in singing is a very valuable 
asset indeed. Massachusetts' hills, of 
wMch Mr. Carroll sings in one of his num- 
bers, are the "Berkshires" not "Berk- 
sures." Several other lapses in enuncia- 
tion detract still further from his singing. 

Mclntryre and Heath are presenting, 
"On Guard," the sketch which many pro- 
nounce tbe best in their repertoire of 
clever blackface acts. In spite of the fact 
that this act has been presented for years, 
it never seems to lose its hold upon the 
public and is as laugh provoking as ever. 
Monday's audience was nearly hysterical 
at the conclusion of the turn. 

Dunbar's Maryland Singers, a female 
quartet singing the songs of the Sixties, 
in which they are assisted by a young 
man banjoist, opened intermission, and 
the old Stephen Foster melodies were ren- 
dered in a most enjoyable manner. The 
young ladies, dressed in the costumes of 
the period, make a charming stage pic- 
ture and sing well. The contralto has a 
beautiful voice, and her rendition of "Old 
Black Joe" was a vocal treat. 

Walter Brewer's pleasing personality, 
combined with the easy and humorous 
manner in which he described his matri- 
monial experiences, the high cost of living 
and other timely topics, won him much 
applause. His recitation of "The Prodigal 
Daughter" was particularly well done, and 
vu keenly appreciated by the female por- 
tion of the audience. 

Cross and Josephine are presenting their 
old act with one or two new numbers 
added. They are big favorites with the 
Riverside audiences, a large portion of 
which seemed to take an almost personal 
interest in the work of these talented 
young people. The best of the vocal 
numbers were "Take It from Me," 
"Everything Is Going Up" and "The Old- 
Fashioned Groom and the TJp-to-Date 
Bride." Their dancing, always one of 
the features of the act, seems to con- 
stantly improve, the work of Miss Jose- 
phine, in particular, being remarkably 

good. - W. V. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on Pages 21 and 29) 



COLONIAL 

The Clown Seal starts off the bill which 
marks the final week of the .present sea- 
son at tbe Colonial. This animal pos- 
sesses a wonderful sense of balance and 
the skill with which it performs a number 
of balancing feats brought applause at 
Monday's matinee from an audience which 
proved to be only lukewarm. The playing 
of "The Last Rose of Summer" was a 
feature of tbe act, and the seal gave a 
very accurate rendition of the number. 

Bill Pruitt, in an early spot, proved to 
be one of the hits of the bill and will 
be further reviewed under New Acts. 

Harry Holman & Co. presented a com- 
edy playlet by Stephen C. Champlin, en- 
titled "Adam Killjoy." Holman'a acting 
in the piece is very good and proves him 
to be deserving of a better vehicle. His 
support seems hopeless, and their acting 
suggests an amateur show. This applies 
with particular emphasis to the young 
man who takes the part of Jack, and who 
seems to have everything to learn regard- 
ing the art of acting. 

Lola Wentworth is an exceptionally at- 
tractive blonde and makes a charming 
stage picture. She has chosen her ward- 
robe with a good deal of care and excel- 
lent taste, and wears five or six different 
costumes during her turn. All are very 
becoming. Miss Wentworth has a good 
voice and renders her numbers pleasingly. 
However, her act does not move with suf- 
ficient swiftness, and needs livening up. 
She makes a mistake in singing two song 
medleys during the act. The first one is 
supposed to be composed of "all the songs 
she remembers" and the second medley is 
composed of musical comedy hits. 

The two prove too much along tbe same 
line. In her airship number, she looks be- 
witching in an aviatrix costume. But the 
song is weak. She needs stronger material. 
That, coupled with her personality and 
charm, would succeed in moving her to a 
later spot on the bill and greater success. 

Conroy and Le Maire close the first half 
of the bill, but seem hardly strong enough 
to claim headline honors. They are a pass- 
able blackface team, but hardly more than 
that can be said. Le Maire, although 
working in blackface, possesses compara- 
tively no darky dialect and tbe makeup is, 
therefore, not justified. Some of the talk 
is very fanny, but the automobile business 
gets a little too noisy and rough at times. 

John A. Ray and Company are present- 
ing a comedy entitled, "Check Your Hat," 
which will be reviewed under New Acts. 

Following this playlet came Ivan Ban- 
koff and Lola Girlie, in a series of original 
dances. Their work is executed very 
neatly, and they prove to be a real pair of 
dancing artists. The first number, which 
is hardly more than a series of poses, is 
very artistically done, and the girl in the 
act does some very neat work upon her 
toes. BankofPs solo "dance has some very 
flashy moments. 

Aveling and Lloyd sauntered on and went 
through their familiar routine at the Colon- 
ial for the second time this season. Al- 
though many of the audience seemed to 
have heard the dialogue before, the team 
was the laughing hit of the bill, neverthe- 
less. Since last seen by this reviewer, 
Aveling has adopted a slightly new line of 
delivery, once in a while suggesting the 
wrist watch type of man. This does not 
improve things, and he would find even 
greater success if he would cut it out and 
be his old, natural self. 

The show was brought to a successful 
close by Jack C. McLallen and May Car- 
son, adepts in the art of roller skating. 
Despite the fact that something went wrong 
with some of the stage props (which tem- 
porarily marred the act), the pair found 
the going a very easy matter. 

H. G. 



AMERICAN 

Number one position was filled by Max 
Laube, who proved to be an excellent 
whistler. 

The O'Neill Twins, two girls, began 
with a song and followed with a few 
dance steps. Then came another song 
and more dancing. Then, with a change 
of costume, they rendered another song 
and a few more steps. For an encore they 
made another change, this time appear- 
ing in suits of blouse and trousers and 
danced. The girls have pleasing person- 
alities and are very strong on dancing. 
They present an attractive act and were 
so well liked they could have taken a 
second encore. 

Martini and Maximilian, two men, pre- 
sented their magical nonsense. These 
boys do a very clever burlesque magic 
act. 

Homer and DuBard, n\an and woman, 
have a song and pianologue offering some- 
what different from the usual run of this 
class of acts. There is a special drop in 
one which represents a department store 
with the woman as salesgirl. Her part- 
ner is a traveling song salesman who tries 
to dispose of his goods and to demon- 
strate their worth he renders three of 
them, with the woman at the piano. Be- 
tween songs they have some good, snappy 
repartee. The woman then sings an 
operatic selection. For their finish they 
have two toy pianos, and on these they 
play a few bars each of a dozen popular 
songs. The woman plays the first one 
and her partner follows with an answer- 
ing song. The act is well put together. 
The material is good and they use it to 
the best advantage. The man is a clever 
comedian and his partner possesses a well 
cultured voice of good quality. 

Anthony Andre and Company, three 
men and a woman, were seen in a dra- 
matic playlet, entitled "The Beggar Man." 
It tells the story of a young girl who is 
about to marry the son of a wealthy and 
aristocratic father who is proud of his 
family tree. He learns that the girl is 
only an adopted child and calls on her 
father who admits he adopted her, but 
proves that her parents were eminently 
respectable. This satisfies the aristocrat 
and he leaves. A tramp then enters and 
the girl's adopted father recognizes in 
him the real father of the girl. The 
tramp, when he learns she is his child, is 
determined to claim her, but the other 
man soon convinces him that by so doing 
he would separate her from the man she 
loves and bring her unhappiness. 

Anthony Andre as the tramp does ex- 
cellent work. He is an actor of sterling 
ability and gives ah example of character 
acting rarely seen on the vaudeville stage. 
In his portrayal he goes from the care- 
less, happy-go-lucky abandon of the 
knight of the road to the broken-hearted 
father who has found his child only to 
lose her. His support was not good. 

Peppino and Perry, two men, opened 
with an accordeon duet, rendering a med- 
ley. They played several other numbers 
and then one of them played a violin to 
the accompaniment of the other's accor- 
deon. They are artists, scored a big hit 
and took an encore. 

Stewart Jackson and Dorothy Wahl 
presented "Before the Theatre" and were 
well liked (6ee New Acts). 

Frank Bush, with his comedy character 
impersonation and funny talk scored a 
laughing hit. He introduced his playing 
on a tin flute on which he gave his bag 
pipe imitations. 

The De Peron Trio, two men and a 
women, presented a novel athletic act in- 
troducing various feats of strength. They 
make a fine appearance. The woman is 
finely formed and the men are well 
trained athletes. E. W. 



ROYAL 

The Royal is having another Patrons' 
Request Week. The bill for this occa- 
sion has been well blended, and seemed 
to please the Bronxites at Monday night's 
performance. 

Lawton, who opened the show, presents 
some very novel ideas in juggling. With 
a number of rubber balls, which he 
bounces on a drum, he manages to pro- 
duce some interesting effects quite out 
of the ordinary. Although the business 
of catching "cannon balls" on the back 
of the neck has been done time and again, 
Lawton's work of this style caused many 
gasps of excitement from various parts 
of the audience. - 

Billy Abbott and Elmore White had an 
easy time of it in the second spot. The 
Hawaiian love song number was sung en- 
tirely too slow and would be much more 
effective speeded up a trifle. The satire 
on tbe present day popular song went 
over big as did also tbe "hula dance." 

Meehan's Canines made their usual hit, 
with the leaping hounds as the feature 
of the act. 

Aveling and Lloyd, the two Southern 
gentlemen, playing a return engagement 
at this theatre, went over but fairly well, 
due, probably, to the fact that their ma- 
terial is the same as was used in their 
previous engagement. These boys have a 
very weak finish to their act, and would 
do well to eliminate their material about 
the different "ages," ending their act with 
Borne good finish line immediately after 
their talk about the queen and her bath. 

Mignon followed with her familiar 
repertoire of mimicry. Her impersona- 
tions of Frances White, Eddie Leonard 
and Bernard Granville were particularly 
good, although, in the Frances White 
number, she sings the verse a bit faster 
than does the original. The impersona- 
tion of Al Jokon is more suggestive of 
Blossom Seeley than of the famous black- 
face singer. 

"Ambition," a playlet by Katherine 
Kavanaugh, is a very melodramatic offer- 
ing, pointing out a double moral: the evil 
of sacrificing everything for ambition, and 
the danger of convicting on circumstan- 
tial evidence. The playlet is well acted 
by Valerie Bergere and Company, ' al- 
though it might well be said, if compari- 
sons are in order, that this offering does 
not take equal rank with "Cherry Blos- 
soms," Miss Bergere's former vehicle. 

After intermission. Bradley and Ardlne 
proceeded to bring down the house with 
what they are pleased to call, "their sing- 
ing and dancing surprise." They sing, 
dance and do bicycle feats with equal 
ease and skill and were given a rousing 
send-off at the conclusion of their turn. 
Their last number was particularly well 
done and the dance at the finish furnishes 
a big flash as well as proving beyond a 
doubt the versatility of the duo. 

Joe Laurie and Aleen Bronson proved 
to be another big hit, although this pair 
become foolish to a tiresome degree. Miss 
Bronson's "language of her own" seemed 
to just suit the taste of some of the 
audience, but to many others it was de- 
cidedly boring and silly. The pair have 
a rather inimitable style of working, and 
make a lot out of only fair material which 
deals entirely too much with a tattered 
shirt and Miss Bronson's foolish talk. 
The song numbers are rendered poorly, 
for the girl Rings exactly the same way 
she delivers her lines, and, if it were not 
for the orchestra, one would have no 
means of knowing that she was singing 
a number. However, the personality of 
the pah- puts the act over in good shape. 
Al Herman, in blackface, is a clever en- 
tertainer, and the Bronxites liked him. 
Here and there a gag is not as new as It 
might be, but Herman knows how to put 
bis stuff over. In handing out "confiden- 
tial stuff" about the other acta, he Is do- 
ing the same thing that a great number of 
other performers have done (and are do- 
ing), but the audience seem to like it 
and, after all, that is the proof 'of the 
pudding. - H. G. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER June 20, 1917 



At HENDERSONS MUSIC HALL, 

Coney Island, this week 



HARRY EMMA 

THE SHARROCKS 



OFFERING 



"Behind the Grand Stand" 



Closing a successful season 
of 41 consecutive weeks 

Direction— PETE MACK 

opening in the Fall in the new 
WINTER GARDEN production 

Management— Messrs. SHUBERT 



I 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




Theatre — Proctor's, Yonkers. 
Style — Classical dancing. 
Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting— Special 

In this act are eight girls, who 
work in the ensemble numbers, and Mile. 
Una, who is featured in several solo 
dances. 

The act occupies a fall stage in a forest 
set The scene is very attractive and 
artistically painted. 

It was rather difficult for the audience 
to know exactly what the different dances 
were supposed to typify, for there were 
no programs to resort to for informa- 
tion. It would be a good idea for the act 
to place an easel on one side of the 
stage, upon which the cardboy could 
place an announcement, of each dance, in 
turn. 

The first number, done in a sombre 
green light, suggested the dawn of morn- 
ing and is probably called "The Awaken- 
ing of the Flowers." The eight girls 
are discovered on the ground, asleep, and, 
one by one, awaken and dance. It is 
very well done. 

Mile. Una is then introduced in a solo 
dance which is done prettily. 

This is followed by another rather 
weak ensemble number. Some of the 
girls seem to possess much more grace 
than others, and spirit seemed to be 
lacking. Also, the extreme types of the 
eight girls seemed to be accentuated in 
this dance, some blonde and some 
brunette, some tall and others small. 
This number could be eliminated to ad- 
vantage. 

Mile. Una shows considerable dex- 
terity as a toe dancer, after which six of 
the girls do a "pipes of pan" dance, 
which is good enough. But vaudeville 
has been saturated with dances of this 
sort. 

Dressed as an old fashioned girl, Mile. 
Una pleases in a rather original dance. 
An ensemble dance, with Mile. Una, 
concludes the routine and is, we presume, 
a "Dance of the Winds." The contrast 
in colors is very effective in this number. 
- Summed up, the ensemble dances are, 
on the whole, too much along the lines 
of other classical dancing acts that have 
preceded this one. At least one of the 
dances should be eliminate!. Mile. Una, 
who is featured, proves her right to this 
distinction and gives a capable and 
artistic performance. The act is elabor- 
ately put on, and shows considerable 
thought. H. G. 



BROWNING & DENNY 

Theatre — Royal. 
Style — Man and girl. 
Time — Sixteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

This clever pair start their act by 
announcing they are "the greatest per- 
formers in the world." There is a little 
talk of the now-that-we-are-here-what- 
ahaU-we-do variety, after which a piano 
is brought on the stage and the man 
plays the girl's song accompaniments. 
She sings a number about taking 
physical culture lectures, which is pnt 
over cleverly, and then a "rube" num- 
ber which she says is her own composi- 
tion, following the number with a "rube" 
dance. She recites a jingle which is not 
funny and should, therefore, be dis- 
carded. 

The man plays a piano solo well, after 
which the girl appears in a kid's cos- 
tume and sings a number about being 
a tom-boy. The final number gives her 
a chance to impersonate Eddie Foy,_ of 
whom she gives a very clever impression. 

In taking the final bow, she is entirely 
too long in appearing, making the man 
hold the stage an uncomfortable length 
of time. 

The turn is a good one of its style. 

H. G. 



CAMERON, DE WITT & CO. 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Nineteen minutes. 

Setting — Hotel room. 

This playlet carries a punch for every 
minute of its running time. While its 
plot is not very deep, it is, nevertheless, 
very entertaining and holds interest 
throughout. 

The man, who is an idle son of a rich 
father, has evidently been painting the 
town red the night before, and, upon 
waking np, asks the hotel clerk the time 
of day, the day of the week, what hotel 
be is stopping in, and in what city it is 
situated. A detective, hired by the man's 
father, puts in an appearance and ac- 
quaints the son that, while out on his 
jamboree, he took unto himself a wife. 
The man remembers nothing whatever 
about it, and the detective promises to 
hush up the woman with a fat check that 
father has signed. The detective leaves. 
Hats, dresses and feminine whatnots 
begin arriving C. O. D., evidently the 
property of the newly acquired wife. 

She proves to be a charming girl, and, 
when the detective gives her the check, 
she tears it up, and then proceeds to make 
her husband promise to go to work to 
support her. He is more than willing. 
The curtain then descends three-quarters 
of the way and stops. The man is quick 
to pull it down the rest of the way, so 
that, unseen, he can love his bride. 

Th_ acting of the man has a lot to do 
with getting the playlet over so success- 
fully, for he possesses an inimitable 
style. The wife does her share of the 
acting more than passably. H. G. 



DAVE HARRIS 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd Street. 

Style — Singing and instrumental. 

Time — Eleven minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

Dave Harris, who, f some years, has 
been appearing as a member of a trio, 
is now doing a single in vaudeville. He 
uses four songs and accompanies him- 
self with these numbers on a freak guitar 
and a ukulele. 

His opening number is a coon song, 
which is well rendered. Announcing that 
everyone is using patriotic numbers, 
Harris gets back to the old type of the 
Spanish War numbers and manages to 
get over well with his offering. His 
Hawaiian medley is a passable offering 
and the "Hesitation Blues," his conclud- 
ing numbeV, rounds the act oat to be a 
fairly acceptable turn for the three-a- 
day houses in an early spot. A. L". 



JEAN MOORE 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 

Style— -Character Singing. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Miss Moore offers a number of charac- 
ter songs, which are attributed to Ev elyn 
Blanchard as "Song Sketches," on the 
program. Such they may be, as they 
are intimate studies, but they are crudely 
assembled. Whether it was her first per- 
formance or just the opening show Miss 
Moore did not seem to be sure of herself 
and her work naturally suffered. 

Hie opening number is a novel one, 
even though patterned after several 
^inllnr vaudeville acts. Her explana- 
tion of what she does in the morning, 
afternoon and evening on Sunday was 
well received. These offerings give her 
an opportunity to show her range of 
versatility. 

The three episodes in the life of a 
country girl, which are put into song, 
are well assembled and rendered just 
about placing the aet on the average 
with the usual early turn in the neigh- 
borhood theatres. A. U. 



AERIAL PATTS 

Theatre— Proctor's 125** Street. 

Styles — Gymnastic. 

Time — Sim minutes. 

Setting — Full stage. 

The Aerial Patts, man and woman, 
work swiftly through their routine of 
stunts on the trapeze. While there is 
not much variety to their torn, they per- 
form capably and should find no diffi- 
culty in securing steady work. 

Their act consisted principally of the 
girl doing the hazardous work of drop- 
ping from the trapeze, sustained by the 
m««< holding the strap, attached to her 
ankle, he meanwhile swinging by hi* 
feet from the trapeze. The man also 
does a bit of strong tooth work. S. W. 



ALBERT ROUGET & GIRLIE 

Theatre— Proctor's 58th Street. 
Style — Gymnastic novelty. 
Time — Seven minute*. 
Setting— Full stage. 

This is a very novel offering and one 
that can be accepted for the three-a-day 
houses in an opening position. 

The stunts executed by Rouget are the 
balancing of a chair on the edge of tables 
from one to four high. His most spec- 
tacular feat is the placing of three chairs 
atop of the four tables and doing a fall 
"a la Bert Melrose." The woman is 
used for one feat in which Rouget has 
her atop his shoulders while balancing 
the chair on a broom. During the 
balance of the act she docs the "Chore" 
work of the turn. A U. 



GEORGE PRIMROSE AND CO. 

Theatre — De Kalb, Brooklyn. 

Style — Minstrel song and dance. 

Setting — In one. 

Time — Ten minutes. 

The act consists of George Primrose, 
the famous minstrel man, assisted by a 
trio working In blackface. The trio, in 
minstrel garb, open with a song, follow- 
ed by the old style minstrel stepping. 
They are then joined by Primrose, who 
does a bit of the kind of dancing that 
made him so popular in former years. 

The trio sing a couple of songs and do 
some more stepping, after which Prim- 
rose does another short dancing bit. 

The act is a neat one. The trio 
harmonize and dance well. Primrose's 
minstrel fame still seems to be remem- 
bered, and the act should prove a draw- 
ing card wherever it plays. H. G. 

THE FOUR CHICKS 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 
Style — Female quartette. 
Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Four pretty girls constitute a quar- 
tette, billed as the Four Chicks, and en- 
tertain with a number of songs, which 
are harmonized in a way that is sure to 
please vaudeville patrons. 

The routine is kept from becoming 
monotonous by one of the girls singing 
a short solo and also by a solo dance, 
done to some snappy jazz music. The 
dance is exceedingly well done, and is 
a feature of the act. 

In the final number, a Hawaiian song, 
one of the girls is allowed to do too 
much of the work. She does her part 
excellently but can hardly be expected 
to furnish all the life of the act. 

The quartette are good entertainers 
and find it a comparatively easy matter 
to succeed. H. G. 



Theatre — Proctor's 68th Street. 

Style — Interpretative dancing and singing 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

Santi, a dancer, is assisted by Virginia 
Ehrgott, billed aa the "late prima donna 
of Chin Chin," and a pretty girl, dressed 
aa a standard bearer, who enters before 
each number with a shield, upon which 
is artistically printed the name of the 
number to follow. 

The stage is boxed in red plush and, 
at back, center, is a stairway of the 
same material. 

In the first number, Miss Ehrgott is 
discovered at the top of the stairway, 
while Santi is at the foot of the stairs, 
dressed as a Persian maid, fanning her 
mistress with a big palm leaf fan. Miss 
Ehrgott sings a Persian number, while 
Santi dances. Santi possesses sharp, 
angular lines, which make her particu- 
larly suited for this style of work, and 
the dance is splendidly done. 

She then leaves the stage to Miss 
Ehrgott, who sings a number in praise 
of Joan of Arc while a unique cloud-like 
lighting effect shows a number of 
American flags in the background. The 
song is well rendered, and the accom- 
paning idea is original. But, French 
flags would be more appropriate for the 
number. 

Santi next dances the Cobra Dance of 
Death, the feature of the act It is a 
wonderful bit of work and Santi's snake- 
like contortions are so realistic, at times, 
that one almost loses sight of the fact 
that the "snakes" are the dancer's arms 
and hands. The fall down the stairs, 
ending in death, makes a classy ending. 
Santi has a big time act. H. G. 

BILL PRUITT 

Theatre — Colonial. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — TAtrteen minute*. 

Setting— In one. 

Bill Pruitt, a strongly built and well 
appearing man, dressed in cowboy at- 
tire, sings a number of songs In an en- 
tertaining way. He has a pleasant voice 
and a likable personality. 

His first song is a love ballad, which 
is followed by an Irish number. In the 
next number he offers a surprise when 
he suddenly shows that he possesses two 
different singing voices and practically 
sings a duet by himself. This la fol- 
lowed by a Western song of the moun- 
tains and the girl who waits for him 
there, which is very well rendered. 

He closes with a patriotic march 
song in which he is joined by a trio 
who sing from the audience. Pruitt is 
strong enough to put over this number 
unaided. 

The act is a good one, and it is a 
pleasure to see men of Pruitt's type 
upon the vaudeville stage. H. G. 



JACKSON t% WAHL 

Theatre — Americon. 
Style — Musical Skit. 
Time— Seventeen minutes. 
Setting — In one and full stage. 

Stewart Jackson and Dorothy Wahl, 
in their new musical oddity, "Before the 
- Theatre" have a very pleasing offer- 
ing. The skit opens in one, with a 
special drop showing exterior of house. 
Jackson appears and sings a serio-comic 
parody on "I Hear You Calling Me." 
Miss Wahl renders a parody of the 
same style. 

The scene then goes to full stage, 
disclosing a well furnished room and 
Jackson at the piano. Miss Wahl enters 
and talks, while he plays and then 
sings a song. Jackson follows with a 
song and dance and his partner has a 
piano solo and a song. 

For a finish, the, scene changes hack 
. to one and they close with a dance. 

E. W. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 




"MY LADY'S GLOVE" 
NEW STRAUS OPERETTA 
OPENS AT LYRIC 



"MX LADY'S GLOVB."— An operetta In 
tbree acts. Munlc by Oscar Straus, book 
and Ijrlea by Edgar Smith, and Edward A. 
Paoltoo- Additional musical numbers by 
Sbrmond Bombers. Presented Monday 
evening, June 18. at toe Lyric Tbeatre. 
OAST. 

Colonel Bombarde ...Charles Jodela 

Captain Policies. u Charles Purcell 

M. Theodore Lampelle Charles McNaoghton 

Antolse ("Tonl") Med Monroe 

Ueut. Ponsonby Horace Sinclair 

Lieut. Jnresu Arthur Geary 

Lieut. Victories Paul Burtnett 

Lieut. Conde J. W. Kelly 

Elaine C'EUy") Vlvlenne Segal 

Lydia Petrowska Frances Demareat 

Mine. Fill Maade Odell 

Charlotte Soaanne Colllngwood 

MInil Doris Marvin 

Mile. Montmartre. a dancer. .Virginia Flsslnger 
Ladles, Debutantes, Officers, Quests, etc 



"My lady's Glove," a revised version of 
"The Beautiful Unknown," a new oper- 
etta by Oscar Straus, composer of "The 
Chocolate Soldier," after several out of 
town showings was seen in New York on 
Monday night and, while its music will 
doubtless never rival the great popularity 
of the famous "Soldier," yet it possesses 
much merit and stamps Straus as one of 
the master light- opera composers. 

In its score is heard entrancing waltz 
melodies, stirring march numbers and one 
or two beautiful love duets which will 
doubtless be remembered long after the 
piece has been withdrawn from the stage. 

The story is light and rather enter- 
taining, dealing with the numerous love 
affairs of a young captain in the French 
army, who on account of the many debts 
he has incurred is about to resign his 
co mmissi on and go to Africa to recoup 
bis fortunes. He is in love with a popu- 
lar young actress and also entertains 
quite an affection for the young daughter 
of the colonel of his regiment, a testy 
old man who, while giving to raging and 
storming about, has a warm spot in his 
heart for the young captain. A design- 
ing widow of uncertain age also has an 
eye on marrying the captain, whose uncle 
is a millionaire and whose fortune it is 
believed he will inherit. 

This belief is dispelled by the arrival 
of the uncle who announces that, before 
transferring his fortune he is to have a 
fling at life itself, and may even con- 
sider matrimony. The actress then trans- 
fers her affection to him, and the young 
captain prepares to leave for Africa. Just 
before leaving he receives a letter en- 
closing a glove and a message that if he 
can find the owner who is wealthy and 
loves him well, he can claim her for his 
bride. 

The search then begins and is only 
ended when he returns from Africa to 
find that it is his childhood sweetheart, 
the colonel's daughter. The designing 
widow has in the meantime captured the 
colonel. 

Charles Purcell is the young captain, 
and he sang and acted the role most ac- 
ceptably. Several of the best songs fell 
to his lot, and he made the most of them. 
Yivienne Segal, the colonel's daughter, had 
several good songs as well as some 
melodious duet numbers which she rendered 
charmingly. Frances Demarest, made of 
the young actress a most pleasing per- 
sonage both to eye and ear, and one of 
the hits of the piece went to her. Charles 
Judels, the martinet of the regiment who 
fell for the wiles of the widow, cleverly 
portrayed by Maude Odell, was excellent, 
and Charles McNaughton, the captain's 
uncle, was amusing in the role of a mil- 
lionaire soup canner who continually re- 
cited the virtues of his soups in couplets. 
WHAT THE DAILIES SAT: 

World — Inartistic. 

Herald — la tccll liked. 

Tribune — Has tome flowing melodies. 

American — Bas tome excellent moments.' 



"DRIFTWOOD" TO OPEN MONDAY 

William Harris, Jr., will present his 
production, "Driftwood," for its initial 
performance at the Belasco Theatre, 
Washington, next Monday evening. If 
the play is found to be a desirable one, 
it will be taken off after the engagement 
and brought to New York in the Fall 
for an extended run. 



HITCHY-KOO AT THE 
COHAN AND HARRIS, 

A CLEVER REVUE 



"HITCHY-KOO. 

■ad twenty sceo 

Harry Grftttan, 
E. Ray Goetz. 
June 7, at tbe C 

Iiamn de Marron. 
Claire de Bouillon 


" — A revue in two acta 
ea. Book and lyrics by 
Glen HacDonough and 
Produced Thursday, 
otaan & Harris Tbeatre. 
OAST. 
William Bock 




Captain Pimento. 






.Miss Adelaide Wintbrop 









Raymond Hitchcock, manager and pro- 
ducer of this new intimate revue, as he 
calls it, gave the production an air of 
intimacy from the start by taking a seat 
in the front row before the rise of the 
curtain and personally welcoming all of his 
friends and acquaintances as they came in. 

After all were seated, he announced that 
the show would begin, and, with the rise of 
the curtain a fast, smooth running Summer 
show was revealed. The cast, the greater 
part of which has been recruited from the 
vaudeville ranks, is a clever one, and all 
are given ample opportunity to display 
their various accomplishments. 

"Hitehy-Koo" is an American version of 
an English piece called "Some," which ran 
for a considerable period in England. But 
there is, in all probability, little of tbe 
original left, for, in the rewriting, Ray- 
mond Hitchcock, manager, has seen to it 
that Raymond Hitchcock, actor, did not 
monopolize the stage during the entire eve- 
ning. On the contrary, several other mem- 
bers of the company were given far more 
to do than he allotted to himself. Rock 
and White, in particular, were. given a big 
share of the evening's work and acquitted 
themselves creditably. Although Miss 
White has been seen in all the vaudeville 
honses, as well as with the Ziegfeld pro- 
duction this season, her popularity seems 
to increase with every performance. 

Grace La Rue's fine voice is heard too 
infrequently in the revue, but the few num- 
bers allotted to this talented lady were ren- 
dered with all her accustomed charm and 
grace. 

Irene Bordoni sang and danced well, her 
French songs, in particular, furnishing one 
of the best parts of the evening's enter- 
tainment. A French version of one of 
America's reigning popular song hits was 
vociferously applauded. 

Leon Errol, although having compara- 
tively little to do, managed to keep himself 
well in evidence, one of his most amusing 
scenes being with Mr. Hitchcock in a pho- 
tographer's studio. 

The Hitchcock portion of the show is 
confined .mainly to a series of monologues, 
interspersed throughout tbe performance. 
Some of these were very funny, while 
others, especially the harangue regarding 
Billy Sunday, were either mildly amusing 
or in rather bad taste, depending upon the 
attitude of the listener in regard to the 
sensational evangelist. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 

Tribune — Is a good vaudeville show. 
Herald— A hit — Hitchcock makes it one. 
Times — Wins by its originality. 
World — Lively and generally bright. 
American— Hitchcock funny in congenial 
role. 



"FOLLIES OF 1917" 
AT NEW AMSTERDAM 
A FINE SPECTACLE 



THE FOLLIES OF 1817, a musical revue; 
book and lyrics by George V. Hobart and 
Gene Buck; nraalc by Raymond BobbeU. 
Dave Stamper, Victor Herbert, ana Je- 
rome Kern. At tbe New Amsterdam, 
Tuesday evening. Jane 14. 

Principals. 
Will Boxers. Bert Williams, Irving Flsb- 
er, Allyn King. Fanny Brlee. Walter L. 
Catlett. William C. Flelda, Marlon and 
Madeline Fairbanks. Eddie Cantor, Boaaell 
Vokea, Don Barclay, Peggy Hopkins, and 

Tom Richards. 



The eleventh edition of Florenz Zieg- 
feld's annual show, which has become al- 
most an institution, in many respects sur- 
passes all of its predecessors. While some 
of the earlier productions may have had 
wittier lines or more novel situations, as a 
spectacle it is quite the best thing Mr. 
Ziegfeld has ever presented. 

It is in the manner of its almost un- 
precedented appeal to the eye that the new 
production excels and no other summer 
entertainment in New York or elsewhere 
has been so gorgeously and expensively 
mounted and costumed. 
' To provide the costumes and scenic ef- 
fects must have cost more than to produce 
any ten ordinary musical shows. In this 
respect the production is in a class entirely 
by itself, but in the matter of clever lines, 
amusing situations or catchy songs the 
piece is hardly up to the standard of some 
of the earlier "Follies." 

Fully a half dozen writers have con- 
tributed to the production, among them 
being George V. Hobart, Gene Buck, Ray- 
mond Hubbel, Dave Stamper, Jerome 
Kern and Victor Herbert, whose patriotic 
finale was one of the big hits of the piece. 
After a tableau in which the ride of Paul 
Revere was represented by a man riding 
a white horse over a treadmill, the figures 
of George Washington and Abraham Lin- 
coln appeared. Then the chorus in artistic 
and striking costumes paraded before a 
great eagle and Walter Catlett representing 
President Wilson reviewed them. The 
orchestra played "The Star Spangled Ban- 
ner," and over the heads of the standing 
audience, a great American flag was 
drawn like a canopy. 

Eddie Cantor, a blackface comedian is 
one of the newcomers who met with suc- 
cess. Walter Catlett, another, has a half 
dozen scenes, most of which are amusing. 
Perhaps his best work was done in the 
tennis scene with W. C. Fields, although 
this portion of the entertainment failed to 
give the. talented Fields the opportunities 
he deserves. 

Officer Voltes and his inebriate dog, 
familiar to the roof patrons scored a hit of 
great proportions and Will Rogers with his 
lariat and clever monologue was sufficiently 
entertaining to keep the audience in its 
seat until long after the usual closing hour. 

Fanny Brice with a clever song about 
a Hebrew-Egyptian maid won her audience 
completely and scored one of the hits of the 
evening. 

A clever reproduction of the information 
bureau at the Grand Central gave Bert 
Williams ample opportunity for some 
clever comedy and his "Home Sweet Home 
Song" was rendered with all his old time 
cleverness. 

Of the score or more big scenes, A 
Chinese affair, was strikingly beautiful and 
another novel effect followed a flower song 
in which girls dressed to represent various 
Sowers sprang np through a trap. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 
Times — Never been surpassed on Wew York 

stage. 
, World — Reaches netc pinnacle of splendor. 
Tribune — One of the most gorgeous pro- 
ductions ever revealed. 
Sun — The best ever. 
Herald — Appears to be the best. 
American— Lavish and startling. 



BRADY TO GIVE MUSIC PLAYS 

William A. Brady announces that, be- 
cause of changes which he anticipates ia 
the theatrical world resulting from this 
country's entrance into the great war, he 
will resume next Fall the production of 
musical comedies.. He will begin with 
"Baby Mine" set to music, and done ia 
what is generally called the "intimate" 
style. This will be Mr. Brady's first pro- 
duction with musical accompaniment since 
"The Balkan Princess" and his revival of 
Gilbert and Sullivan comic operas. 



"A MAN'S HOME" CAST FILLED 

For the new play, "A Man's Home," by 
Anna S. Richardson and Edmund Breese, 
to be produced by the Shuberts, George 
Nash has been engaged to play the stellar 
role. Others in the cast will be Robert 
Cain, Conrad Nagle, Margaret Dale, Thais 
Magrane, Marion Coakley, Loretta Wells, 
Harry Bradley, Charles De Lima, Edward 
Nannary, Donald Sawyer and Polly 
Preyor. 



SET "FRIEND MARTHA" PREMIERE 

"Friend Martha," the new play by Ed- 
ward Peple, to be produced by Edgar Mc- 
Gregor, will have its New York presenta- 
tion at the Booth Theatre on August 13. 
In the cast will be Edmund Breese, Oza 
Waldrop, Helen Lowell, Florence Edney, 
Lucia Moore, Reginald Denny, Charles A. 
Stevenson," Sydney Greenstreet, John L. 
Shine and Wallace Erskine. 



"TARGET" IS REHEARSING 

"The Target," Samuel Sbipman's play, 
which will be brought to New York about 
the middle of August, has been put into 
rehearsal by A. H. Woods, under the direc- 
tion of Ira Harde. In the cast are Em- 
mett Corrigan, Harry Mestayer, Harry C. 
Browne, James Spotwood, Clara Joel, 
Mary Cecil Parker, Maida Turner and 
Suzanne Wills. 



PLAYERS CLOSING JUNE 30 

The Washington Square Players are in 
the last two weeks of their season at the 
Comedy Theatre. The present bill, con- 
sisting of Strindberg's "Pariah," "Another 
Way Out," by Lawrence Langner, and 
"Plots and Playwrights," by Edward Mas- 
sey, will be continued to tbe end of tbe 
season, after which the company will take 
a vacation. 



HAMMERSTEIN LEASES CASINO 
Arthur Hammerstein has secured from 
the Messrs. Shubert a lease on the Casino 
Theatre, where he will present a series of 
Snmmer musical comedies. He has con- 
tracted for the use of the theatre for the 
Spring and Summer of each year. The 
first of his series will be known as Ham- 
merstein's musical comedy, "Series of 
1918." 



"DEW DROP INN" OPENS 

Chicago, June ""8. — "Dew Drop Inn," 
with Percival Knight, Winona Winter. 
Arthur A. Aylsworth, Frederic Santle.v. 
and other favorites, opened at the Illinois. 
Sunday evening. 



REVIVE "THE MIKADO" 

Providence, R. I., June 19. — "The Mi- 
kado" was revived here yesterday in Stock 
with Ada Meade, Georgia Harvey, Jack 
Squire and Frank Monlan in the leads. 



BARR1E PLAYS CLOSING 

The Barrie plays, which have been pre- 
sented at tbe Empire Theatre for some 
time, are in their last week, the engage- 
ment terminating Saturday night. 



SET "IBBETSON" REOPENING DATED 

"Peter Ibbetson, which concluded its 
engagement at the Republic Tbeatre last 
Saturday' night, will again be seen at that 
house, -on -and after August 27. 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




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NEW YORK, JUNE 20, 1817 

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The Plaint of Eugene Walters 

Within the week, Eugene Walter has 
made the announcement that he is forced 
to seek for actors and actresses of the red 
blood sort among the stock companies in 
the towns and smaller cities, because there 
are none in New York. He says the fem- 
inist movement, is responsible for lack of 
virility among Broadway players. 

There is no question that Walter will 
find many a sterling player in the byways 
and highways of stock, but we question 
that lack of virile actors on the New York 
stage makes it necessary to search those 
localities to secure desirable people for the 
cast of a play. There are just as virile, 
red-blooded, forceful actors on our stage to- 
day as there were, ten or twenty years ago, 
and this is probably as far back as Mr. 
Walter would care to acknowledge as com- 
ing within his memory. 

And there are just as many of the ris- 
ing young actors and actresses to be seen 
on the present New York stage as there 
were in the palmy days of the Empire The- 
atre stock company when Henry Miller and 
Viola Allen were in the height of their 
popularity, 

Walter bemoans the decadence of the ac- 
tress who can act with the punch — who 
can start when started. What has he to 
say of the ability of Fay Bainter, Emily 
Ann Wellman, Marjorie Patterson, Lola 
Fisher and many more young women whose 
ability was "discovered" during the last 
season. Surely tbey can act with a punch 
and have the ability to start without re- 
quiring to be started. 

Forrest Winant, Louis Bennison, and a 
long list of others are shining examples of 
rising young actors who think for them- 
selves and who are capable of portraying 
any character for which they may be cast. 

But the fact of the matter is that the 
actor who becomes a Broadway favorite 
places a value upon his services that some 
people in the business deem excessive and 
this fact prevents these same people from 
engaging them and causes them to search 
in the highways and byways of stock for 
"capable players." 

We believe that any manager who is 
willing to pay a Broadway salary can se- 
cure as many Broadway actors, who have 
the "punch," as he desires. 



Answers to Queries 

W. W. W. — Ethel Levey is in England. 

• • • 

T. S. — Gua Rogers died several years ago. 
Max Rogers is alive. 

• • • 

P. P. — We have no record of Viola Allen 
ever having appeared in vaudeville. 

• • • 

V. 6.— Fred Belasco, the California 
manager, is a brother of David Belasco. 

• • * ' 

D. E. F.— "Little Lord Fauntleroy" was 
her most popular work seen on the stage. 

• • • 

I. F. — Edward Temple was at one time 
general stage director of the New York 
Hippodrome. 

• • • 

TJ. O. — The late Joseph Brooks was 
manager of Wm. H. Crane when the latter 
appeared in "The Senator." 

• • * 

V. M. — Ralph and Thomas Ince were 
known to the dramatic stage before they 
entered the motion picture field. 

• • • 

G. B.— -Grand Opera at popular prices 
was presented for several full seasons by 
Henry W. Savage at the American Theatre. 

• • • 

R. Y. — Sam Bernard was one of vaude- 
ville's most popular stars before he joined 

Weber & Fields Music Hall stock company. 

• • • 

R. J. G. — It is generally conceded that 
"Sally in Our Alley" was written about 
1740. It is therefore not a very modern 
song. 

• • * 

N. W. — Lew Fields will not star next 
season. He will appear at the Century 
under the direction of Dillingham & 

Ziegfeld. 

• * • 

P. H. — Evelyn Nesbit had appeared in 
several Broadway Musical productions be- 
fore she became the wife of Harry K. 
Thaw. 

• * • 

F. K.— "Gypsy Love" and "The Littlest 
Rebel" were productions of A. H. Woods. 
Dustin and William Farnum appeared in 
the latter. 

• • • 

H. E. J. — "Justice" was produced under 
the sole management of John D. Williams. 
He and Corey and Riter originally man- 
aged Mrs. Fisfce in "Erstwhile Susan." 

• * * 

J. G. J. — Corse Payton conducted a 
stock company in his own theatre in Brook- 
lyn for several seasons. He was there 
when Mrs. Spooner opened her company in 
that city. 

• • • 

S. Q. — Wells Hawks waa the first Abbot 
of the Friars, but Charles Emerson Cook 
was president of the Press Agents Club at 
the time the name of that organization waa 
given the name of Friars. 

• *> - • 

B. D. — "E7<iryman" waa the first 
morality play to find favor in New York. 
It waa produced by the Ben Greet Players 
of which Margaret Wycherly was then the 
leading lady. The play is centuries old. 

• - • * 

S. G. N. — Florence Reed was not a rela- 
tion of the late Charlie Reed, of Reed and 
Collier. The late Roland Reed was her 
father. She made her first stage appear- 
ance in vaudeville and later appeared in 

stock. 

• » • 

E. T. — George Broadhurst has been 
writing plays for more than a quarter of 
a century. One of his first successes, if 
not actually the first, was "The Wrong 
Mr. Wright" which was produced by the 
late Roland Reed. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Dr. W. F. Carven produced "The 
Scout" 

Frank Tousey published Felix McGlen- 
non's songs. 

The American Society of Scene Painters 
waa chartered at Albany, N. Y. 

Montana won the Suburban Handicap. 

Hope Booth was engaged for "Euchred." 

Bob Fitzsimmons arranged to appear in 
"The Heroic Blacksmith." 



HOGAN WOUNDED AGAIN 

Editor, I'.sw Yoke Clipper: 

Dear Sir: Just a few lines to let my 
friends know I have been wonnded once 
more and, at present, am in England, far 
away from the sound of the guns. 

It was on April the 9th (Easter Mon- 
day), at 5:30 A. m., that the Canadians 
started their drive on the Ridge. The 
weather was very bad, ts it waa raining 
and snowing all the night before. But, in 
the face of it all, we went over the top at 
Fritz. But, when we got as far as bia 
front line, there was nothing left of it, as 
our guns bad smashed everything. 

When we got to his second line of 
trenches, though things were different as 
our guns had been playing on his front 
line. So our boys had quite a fight there. 
Of coarse, there is no use of me telling how 
many Germane were killed, as I was too 
excited, and only know what happened 
right in front of myself. Anyway, we got 
old Frits on the run, and no matter what 
he done to stop us we kept him going until 
we had him right over the far side of Vimy 
Ridge. 

Then we stopped and dug ourselves in. 
It was 3:30 in the afternoon by this time, 
but we had pushed Fritz from the ridge 
and had advanced nearly six miles through 
all the mud, the snow and rain, not count- 
ing the shells and ballets. So, we were 
pretty tired. We got the word about 9 
o'clock at night to stand to as the Ger- 
mans were making a counter attack. That 
is when I got mine. A big shell hit about 
sixty-five yards from where our company 
was standing and it just sprinkled us like 
rain with shrapnel. I got four pieces, two 
in my left arm, one in my leg and a small 
piece in my head. 

Well, then was the time to get out. So 
I happened to see a stretcher bearer near 
by and got him to fix my wounds for me, 
and had me carried out And it was not 
long before I was over in good old England 
once more. 

Well, everything is going fine with me, 
except my left arm, which is very stiff and 
sore. But then it takes time for it to heal 
np. 

I expect to be here for at least another 
couple of months before I return to the 
line. So, if any of my old friends will 
drop me a line, I would be pleased to hear 
from them as I have lost their addresses 
and, of course cannot write them. 

Hoping all had a good season last winter 
and the best of luck to all and hoping to 
see you soon. I remain, 

No. 772475. Pte. A. M. Hooan, D Co., 
1st Canadian Command Depot, Hastings, 
Sussex, England. 

P. S. — I forgot to tell you the Cana- 
dians are just waiting to get the Americans 
beside them and, they gay, wait until the 
Yankees and Canadians get going together 
and we will show the Germans what is 
made on our side of the water. A. M. H. 



R1ALT0 RATTLES 



CHORUS GIRL WANTS RAISE 

Editor, New York Clipper: 
Dear Sir. — I would like to say a few 

words in regards to chorus girls. I am 

a chorus girl and speak from experience. 

The high cost of living makes it very 
hard to live on $18 a week on the road, 
and I think all shows should pay their 
chorus $22 a week. They would have bet- 
ter girls, because there are girls who want 
to lead a good moral life. Thanking you 
for your kindness, I am 

Yours sincerely, 
• Elsie Cammoran. 

St. Louis, June 14, 1917. 



LIKES MONOLOGISTS 

Editor, New York Clipper: 

Dear Sir : Why are there so few monol- 
ogists on the vaudeville stage to-day? A 
few years back monologue acts were so 
plentiful that the majority of bills carried 
one and it was common to see following 
in successive weeks such entertainers as 
Ezra Kendall, J. W. Kelly, Charley Case, 
Sam Bernard, John Ransone, Joe Welch, 
Press Eldridge and a host of other good 
ones. .. -.,- 

Yours truly, 

Carl Hachke, 
1547 Fordham Road. 
June 18, 1917. 



HE PLAYED SAFE 

Harry Ellis made a hit at the Polo" 
Grounds — with a patriotic long. 

HAZARDOUS 

Alice Dovey has married Jack Hazzard, 
evidently considering it worth while to 
chance the hazard. 



WILLIE COLLIES AND QUIET 

Helena Collier, sister of Willie Collier, 
plans a quiet silver wedding. Isn't she 
going to invite Willie T 

LOGIC IS LOGIC 

Jess Willard should have no trouble re- 
taining the heavyweight championship be- 
cause he is the only fighter that has a 
show. 



THE TABLES TURNED 

When Eddie Foy registered for the 
State Military Census wonder what his 
answer was to the question, "Anyone de- 
pendent on you?" Probably he wrote, 
"No. I am dependent on seven." 

WHY WORK? 

George Crager has been ordered to pay 
his divorced wife a small amount of ali- 
mony weekly, the amount to be increased 
as soon as bis financial condition war- 
rants. It would pay him to loaf. 

HE OUGHT TO KNOW 

Mercedes has written to Secretary of 
War Baker to find out how he can best 
serve the country in the present war. 
Being a mind-reader, he ought to know 
the answer without worrying Baker about 
it. ■ 



A FARE JOKE 

When a conductor on a Seventh Ave- 
nue car waa singing out the names of the 
streets the other day, we bear that Ben 
Roberts wanted to hail him as a brother 
member of the Associated Musical Con- 
ductors. 



GOOD FOR ROYALTIES 

Sam Shipman can rightly ask, "What's 
in a name?" for his playlet, "The Good 
for Nothing," has proved to be good for 
something in light of the fact that It is 
to be converted into a three-act play for 
next season. 



A BARD PUN 

Because Anna Marble is to become gen- 
eral director of publicity for the William 
Harris, Jr., attractions next season 
doesn't necessarily imply that the Harris 
publicity department will be run by a 
marble head. 



AFTER VAUDE EDUCATES HIM 

Rev. Frank W. Gorman, the pastor who 
is to spend the summer in vaudeville, will 
probably refuse to open the services when 
he gets back to his pulpit at Zanesville 
next autumn, and will demand a better 
spot on the bill. 

IMPOSSIBLE TASKS 

Flopping with a patriotic song. 

Getting a xylophonist to desist from 
Playing "William Tell" or "Poet and 
Peasant." 

Finding a man who hasn't, some time 
in his life, written a play. 



HEARD ALONG BROADWAY 

"Can you imagine a death scene lasting 
half an hour?" 

"I haven't even saved enough money this 
season to buy a Liberty Bond." 

"I even stopped the supper show." 

"I knew him when he was suping with 
Mansfield." 



A BUSINESS PROPOSITION 

On Premium Night at the Harlem 
Opera House one of the winning numbers 
wag 98,009. No one in the audience 
seemed to claim the number. "98,009!" 
shouted Sol Levoy, the Harlem Santa 
Claus, for about the tenth time. "Make 
it a little cheaper, Sol!" yelled a voice 
from the audience. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 



LONDON 



PARIS 




BERLIN 



SYDNEY 




London, Eng., June 9. 
The Ryewodes will be in town next week. 

Vera and Vi were at Luton this week. 



Pip and Melinda have presented a new 
act 



Lee Ephraim has a new act in prepara- 
tion. 



Loupe and Ladies are at Collins' next 
week. 

The Magic Crucible is in Maryport this 
week. 



Eugene Ellis has been discharged from 
the army. 



The Cornettie Trio is at the King's The- 
atre, next week. 



Jim Nolan will be seen at the Palace, 
Burnley, next week. 



Harry Blake plays the Hippodrome, 
Willesden, next week. 



Phyllis and Giles play the Hippodrome, 
St Helens, next week. 



"Under Cover" has passed it 150th per- 
formance at the Strand. 

"Bochles," the new Scotch revue, is 
proving highly successful. 

Barry Leighton, late of Leighton and 
Melville, is now in France. 



The Duke of York's Theatre can be 
leased after next Saturday. 



The Two Cures have been at the Palla- 
dium, Southport, this week. 

George Ross writes that he is meeting 
with success in South Africa 



Marie Sinclair and Tom Robinson have 
been in Birmingham this week. 



Sam Barton is booked at the Euaton 
Palace, London, week after next 



"A Little Bit of Fluff" has passed its 
750th performance at the Criterion. 



May Starr goes to West Hartlepool next 
week and will be seen at the Empire. 



Hilda Elen and Grace Gallimore close 
tonight a good week at the Canterbury. 

Alfredo and Fred Elton are booked for 
a South African tour and leave shortly. 



The Three Saxley's are booked to play 
the Picturedrome, Newark, week after next 



George Reeves has been engaged by J. 
Richard Millet for a tour of the provinces. 

Alf Askey is in a hospital in Newcastle 
suffering from wounds received in France. 



Rose Lee Ivy, the California vocalist is 
meeting with success everywhere she ap- 
pears. 

Alfredo and Fred Eaton have signed for 
a tour of the halls of the African theatres 
Trust Ltd. 

Ibsen's "Rosmersholm" started Its Tues- 
day and Friday matinees at the St Mar- 
tin's this week. 



Yorke Stephens' new sketch by Sewell 
Collins, entitled "Just Like a Man," has 
made a success. 



Phyllis Dailley and company are doing 
splendidly in their new comedy playlet 
"Long Liz." 



The annual meeting of the Actors' 
Church Union was held last Tuesday at 
Wyndham's Theatre. The Bishop of Win- 
chester presided. 



Wallie Bice, proprietor of the Imperial 
Palace, Canning Town, has taken the Pal- 
ace Theatre, Bow. 



Dolsey Cariello, who - recently returned 
from the South African tour, is playing 
the Gulliver Tour. 



Although "Vanity Fair" continues a 
success at the Palace, Alfred Butt will 
withdraw it to-night. 

"The Enchanted Island" is the title of 
a fairy play which Mrs. Melnotte Wyatt 
has accepted for production. 



"The Food Inspection," Wilson and 
W arings' new sketch, is one of the big 
laugh makers of the season. 



Owing to shortage of men, Fred Moule 
has postponed the production of his new 
act "Moonshine and Shadows." 



Winif .ed Holme plays the Palace, Burn- 
ley, next week, and opens the following 
Monday at St. Georges, Kendal. 



Loie Conn, female impersonator, opens 
a tour of the Stoll houses next week, when 
he plays the Empire, Shepherd's Bush. 



Will Dalton, the agent, has secured in- 
terests in the Hannaway Brothers act and 
the comedy-revue "Frills and Fancies." 

There is a movement on foot to estab- 
lish an Association of Jewish Actors along 
the lines of the Actors' Church Union. 

The Four Clovelly Girls are booked to 
piny the Palace, Hammersmith, week after 
next They are playing the L. T. V. Tour. 



It is the general opinion of managers 
that the increased entertainment tax will 
not go into effect before October, if at all. 

Grossmith and Lanrillard have in con- 
templation an early production of "Peter 
Potter," a play by Frederick Firth Shep- 
bard. 



EL J. Crane has been appointed resident 
manager of the Grand, Edinburgh, suc- 
ceeding P. Whitton, who has joined the 
Army. 

John Douglass, the ex-manager and well- 
known playwright has completed a new 
play, which is likely to have an early pro- 
duction. 



Albert De Courville has accepted for 
presentation at the Hippodrome "Naval 
Gas," a naval skit written by J. Seager- 
Anderson. 



Dollie Bishop is in the cast of "The 
Great Calamity," a new sketch by Ques- 
tran Marc, found public favor recently at 
the Bedford. 

Harry Sharp has joined the colors and 
bis act, Sharpe'a Tromboneers, will be un- 
der the direction of Charles Gibbs until 
after the war. 



Having purchased the producing right 
of the revue "Search Me," P. T. Selbit has 
pat it out with a good cast including George 
Jackley, Ethel Erskine, Ray Holgate and 
Walter Cross. 



The Four D'Ormondes go to the Hip- 
podrome, Willesden, next Monday, and 
play the Euston Palace, London, the 
week following. 



"Penny Wise," Aldin, Collins and Mac- 
dona's Lancashire comedy at the Prince 
of Wales' Theatre, seems to have caught 
the public fancy. 



"The Outcry," by Henry James, will be 
the Incorporated Stage Society's last pro- 
duction this season. June 17 and 18 are 
the probable dates. 



Bobbie Elliott of August and Septem- 
ber, has been chosen to arrange all con- 
certs held in connection with his regiment 
now located in India. 



Mrs. Marcus Draper has engaged Victor 
Garden to play the role of Colonel Tor- 
rens in "Nobody's Daughter." 

"Fcr My Country," is another new war 
sketch of recent production which has 
won success. It is played by Frances 
Ivor and Charles M. Hallard. 

Just now there seems to be an epidemic 
of "Ghosts." Several companies are play- 
ing this work of Ibsen's and report has it 
there are to be several more. 



Lily Ash, of Ash and Adler, while play- 
ing the Palace, Salisbury, recently, was 
the recipient of a bouquet consisting of a 
good week's supply of potatoes. 



J. Fred Watson, formerly manager of 
the Grand, Radcliffe, has been appointed 
manager of the Bordesley Palace, Bir- 
mingham, on the Moss Empire Circuit. 

Fred Osmond has secured the producing 
rights to "His Wife's Husband," a new 
domestic drams, by Ruth ZUlwood. He 
will make the production in September. 

Leon Morton, the Ambassador's com- 
edian, has been engaged by Oswald Stoll 
to appear shortly at the London Coliseum 
in a new sketch entitled "Hello, Morton!" 

The Hippodrome, Keighley, which has 
been given over to drama and musical 
shows, is to see a change of policy and 
variety will be booked almost exclusively. 



"Good News" having closed, Seymour 
Hicks and Ellaline Ternss plan a Summer 
tour. On their return to London in Sep- 
tember they will be seen at the Princess 
Theatre in Walter Hackett's new play 
"The Freedom of the Seas." 



H. B. Irving has secured for production 
"Victory," a play by Joseph Conrad and 
Basil Macdonald Hastings, based on Mr. 
Conrad's novel of the same name. Mr. 
Irving will not present "Victory" until 
after he produces a play by Vachell. 



"The Three Daughters of M. Dupont" 
a hitherto prohibited play, is slated for 
revival at the Ambassador's Theatre with 
Ethel Irving and O. B. Clarence in the 
same roles they played in the original Eng- 
lish production of the work twelve years 
ago at King's Hall, Covent Garden. 



The Southward Tribunal recently, when 
passing upon the matter of a stage man- 
ager's exemption, were confronted with the 
fact that the manager had been unable to 
fill his place and his loss at the present 
time might mean the closing of the house. 
The question being asked the Tribunal 
whether it was necessary to keep music 
halls open at all was answered by one of 
the Council who said, "But you must keep 
them open." 



MANY HALLS ARE OPEN IN PARIS 

Pabis,- Ft., June 14. — The Olympia is 
now open four days a week, Fridays, 
Saturdays, Sundays and. Mondays, with 
two shows daily. Gaumont Palace, with 
pictures and one or two variety turns is 
open Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and 
Sundays, with matinees Thursdays and 
Sundays. The Alhambra is open every 
night and gives two matinees weekly. The 
Madrono the same. The Casino de Paris 
has a daily matinee and evening perform- 
ances Thursday, Saturday and Sunday. 
The Ambassadeurs and the Marigny are 
open every night with matinees Thursdays 
and Sundays. " 



GABY TO ACT IN DRAMA 

London, Eng., June 17. — Gaby Deslys, 
now appearing with Harry Pilcer in 
"Suzette" at the Globe intends entering 
the field of drama and has commissioned a 
well known author to write her a play of 
strong dramatic interest the leading femin- 
ine role of which she will portray. The 
work is being written from ideas suggested 
by Gaby and it is stated that the strong 
scenes of the play will be marked by sen- 
sationalism. 



STILL DOING BIG BUSINESS 

London, Eng., June 16. — The 768th per- 
formance of "A Little Bit of Fluff" occurs 
to-night at the Criterion and is still crowd- 
ing that theatre. Other shows playing to 
capacity are "Chu' Chin Chow," at his 
Majesty's; "General Post" at the Hay- 
market, and "Under Cover" at the Strand. 
The latter is nearing its two-hundredth 
performance. 



JOURNALISTS TO HAVE BENEFIT 

London, Eng., June 18. — "Wlfelike," a 
sketch written for the occasion by John 
Warr and Fred Farren, in which Phyllis 
Dare and Ralph Lynn will appear, will be 
a feature of the matinee at the Ambassa- 
dors Theatre next Friday in aid of the 
National Union of Journalists' War Dis- 
tress Fund. 



FAMOUS CHINESE SINGER DEAD 

London, Eng., June 12.— Word has just 
reached here of the death in Pekin, China, 
of Prince Tan, considered the greatest ce- 
lebrity the Chinese stage has ever known. 
Tan, who was seventy-two years of age, 
was a noted singer and possessed a re- 
markable voice. He was idolized by the 
Chinese public. 



LONDON TO SEE "GREAT LOVER" 

London, Eng., June 14. — Sir Herbert 
Tree, who has arrived from the United 
States has begun preparations for his pro- 
duction of "The Great Lover" which will 
soon be seen at a West End theatre with 
Sir Herbert in the leading role. 

OPPOSE ERECTION OF THEATRE 

London, Eng., June 12. — The proposal 
of Alfred Butt to build a new theatre in the 
West End near Golden Square, has brought 
protests from two churches and one hos- 
pital, the authorities of which announce 
that' they will oppose Butt to the last ditch. 



ADA REEVE COLLECTING FOR WAR 

Melbourne, Aus., June 5. — Ada Reeve, 
who started the Ansae Buffet Appeal last 
month has proved to be the best individual 
collector of War contributions this coun- 
try has seen. She has collected several 
thousands of pounds to date. 



NURSES SEE "VANITY FAIR" 
London, Eng., June 14 — The American 
Red Cross Nurses, who lately arrived, at- 
tended a performance of "Vanity Fair" at 
the Palace Theatre, as the guests of Alfred 
Butt 



MARTINETTI RECOVERED 
London, Eng., June 12. — Paul Martin- 
etti, recovered from bis recent severe ill- 
ness, is again seen at the vaudeville club. 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




CECIL SP00NER 

RETURNING TO 

BROOKLYN 

WILL OPEN SEPT. 1 at GRAND O. H. 



' Cecil Spooner, after an absence of sev- 
eral years, will return to Brooklyn in the 
Fall, and, with hei stock company, will 
occupy the Grand Opera House. 

A long term lease has been taken on the 
theatre for this purpose and, after ex- 
tensive improvements, it will open about 
September 1. 

New plays will be tried out from time 
to time, and those which are found worthy, 
are promised a Broadway production. 

Miss Spooner will try out a new plan 
here, which will be to allow the success- 
ful plays to remain for two, three or four 
weeks, or even longer, if the public de- 
mand requires it. She believes that Brook- 
lyn has grown beyond the "one week 
stand" stage and since Oliver Morosco finds 
this policy successful in Los Angeles and 
John Craig at the Castle Square Theatre 
in Boston, she is encouraged to try it out 
in Brooklyn. 

At present, the Spooner Stock Co. is op- 
erating at the Park Theatre, Bridgeport, 
where it intends to remain throughout the 
Bummer. New plays are being given try- 
outs there and the successful ones will be 
included in the company's repertoire when 
it comes to Brooklyn. 



POLI CO. SELLS LIBERTY BONDS 
Waterbuby, Conn., June 18. — The mem- 
bers of the Poli utock Co. last week, be- 
tween morning rehearsals and the matinee 
performances, went about the streets of 
Waterbury, speaking before the employees 
of large factories in their efforts to sell 
Liberty bonds. They secured subscrip- 
tions amounting to $21,000. 



CHASE LISTER CO. CLOSES 

Scons Bluffs, Neb., June 14. — The 
Chase Lister Co., Northern, has closed its 
season here and will open its next season 
early in August in Iowa. Much of the 
same territory will be played. The Three 
Dancing Pearsons have been engaged for 
next season and Bush Burnchter, comedian, 
bas been re-engaged. 



LYNN TO HAVE NEW CO. 

Lynn, Mass., June 18. — A new musical 
comedy stock company is being organized 
for the Lynn Theatre and the opening will 
take place shortly. Harry Bulger, Jr., son 
of the comedian, has been engaged for the 
company. 

HOWARD OPENING IN VANCOUVER 

Vancouver, Can., June 16. — A new 
stock company will open at the Empress 
Theatre, July 2, under the management of 
George Howard. "Which One Shall I 
Marry?" will be the initial attraction. 

FORMING NEW CO. FOR PHILA. 

Philadelphia, June 18. — A new stock 
company will open at the Knickerbocker 
Theatre here next Monday, under the man- 
agement of Barnett Greenwood. "Under 
Two Flags" will be the initial offering. 



BALTIMORE MAY HAVE STOCK 

Baltimore, June 18. — It is reported that 
Frederick C. Schanenberger, of the Ker- 
nau enterprises, is to open a stock com- 
pany next Monday at the Auditorium The- 
atre for a Summer run. 



ELISE BARTLETT IN HARLEM CO. 

Elise Bartlett is a new member of the 
Broadway Players at Hurtig & Seamon's 
One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Street The- 
atre, joining last Monday in one of the 
leading roles of "The Songs of Songs." 



SNEDEKER QUITS ONE NIGHTS 

Pocatello, Idaho, June 16. — The 
Snedeker Stock Co. has closed a season 
of one hundred and twenty-two weeks of 
one night stands and will open a per- 
manent stock engagement here June 25, 
using high class royalty plays and special 
scenery. Mr. Snedeker has leased the 
Auditorium - Theatre and is having it re- 
decorated and a lady orchestra installed. 
Arrangements are being made with F. A. 
P. Gazzolo for "The Little Girl God For- 
got" and this attraction will no doubt be 
used as the opening bill. 



DAVIS WANTS BALTIMORE HOUSE 

Baltimore, June 16. — Harry Davis, the 
Pittsburgh manager, is negotiating for the 
lease of the Lyceum Theatre,' with the idea 
of making it one of bis chain of playhouses. 
Tunis F. Dean, the former manager of the 
New Academy of Music, will be made man- 
ager. A stock company will be installed 
at the theatre, which will alternate with 
the companies in his other theatres. 



BUHLER OPENING IN COLUMBUS 

Columbus, O., June 16. — Richard Buh- 
ler will open a season of stock at Olen- 
tangy Park, a suburb of this city, next 
Monday. The opening bill will be "Com- 
mon Clay" and in the company, besides 
Mr. Buhler, will be Lillian Kemble, Mabel 
Carruthers, Boy Gordon, A. S. Byron, 
William Holden, Hamilton Christie and 
Max von Mitzel. 



ELLIOTT JOINS NEW COMPANY 

Toledo, O., June 16. — Jimmie Elliott 
and wife (Kittie Warren) just closed 
eight weeks of musical comedy stock at the 
Arcade Theatre, and open to-morrow at the 
Colonial Theatre for a summer run. Jim- 
mie for straights and Kittie for soubrettes 
and chorus directress. 



ROBINS TO TRY MUSICAL STOCK 

TOBONTO, Can., June 16. — Edward H. 
Robins, manager of the Bobins Players, 
will convert his dramatic stock company 
into a musical organization for a few 
weeks. The first musical comedy the com- 
pany will try is "The Man Who Owns 
Broadway." 

SMTTHFIELD WINS PRAISE 

Cincinnati, June 16. — The Cincinnati 
papers are giving George F. Smithfield 
much praise for his acting in the role of 
Dogberry in "Much Ado About Nothing," 
presented by the Devereux Players at the 
Zoo Woodland Theatre. 



HOWELL LEAVING CHAMPLIN CO. 
PoTTSvnxE, Pa., June 16. — Earl H. 
Howell and Mae A. McCaskey will close 
their season with the Chas. K. Champlin 
Co. next Saturday at Keyport, N. J., and 
will spend the Summer at Tremont, Pa. 



STOCK ACTOR LOSES FATHER 

Los Angeles, CaL, Jnne 15. — William 
Elwyn, father of Lome M. Elwyn, actor 
and manager of a stock company, now in 
Canada, died here recently, in his seventy- 
fifth year. 

DUBINSKYS TO REOPEN SHORTLY 

St. Joseph, Mo., June 17. — The Du- 
binsky Bros., who recently closed their 
stock company at the Tootle Theatre, are 
planning to reopen July 20. 

ENTERPRISE CO. IN CHICAGO 

Chicago, June 18. — The Enterprise 
Stock Co., under the management of Nor- 
man Hilyard, has opened at the Star Hip- 
podrome for an all Summer season. 



OKLA. CITY TO HAVE CO. 

Oklahoma City, Okla., June 16. — Fred- 
erick Clarke is installing a stock company 
at the Auditorium Theatre, opening next 
Monday. 



LEXINGTON 

HAS NEW 

STOCK 

BLUNKALL INSTALLS COMPANY 



The Lexington Avenue Opera House, 
which returned to a policy of stock when 
Corse Payton brought a company there, 
will continue with that policy in" spite of 
Payton leading the house. 

No sooner had Payton and his company 
vacated the theatre, than E. J. Blunkall 
secured a lease on the house and a new 
stock organization was installed Monday, 
June 11. 

From present indications, the company 
will remain throughout the Summer. - The 
receipts for last week, the opening one, 
were double those for the first week of the 
Payton engagement and Thursday night the 
house was sold out to the Western Union 
Educational Society. 

The company opened with "The House 
of Glass," and the cast was headed by 
Frances Shannon as Margaret Case and 
John Todd, as Harvey Lake. Others in- 
cluded Myrtle Bordini, as Nellie, Helen 
Miller as Mrs. Brandt, Bert Grey as Frank, 
Foster Williams, as James Burke, B. J. 
Blunkall, as Carroll, Philip Queen as 
Crowley, Paul Porter as the Japanese 
servant, Franklyn Munnell, as Edward 
McLellan, Arthur Byran as Judson At- 
wood, Helen Hargraves as Edith and T. 
EL Quinn as Governor Patterson. 

This week "Freckles" is the attraction 
and Paul Porter is playing the title role. 

Tbe leading female roles will be divided 
between Frances Shannon, Myrtle Bordini 
and Helen Miller and the leading male roles 
between Foster Williams, Paul Porter and 
John Todd. 

George J. Elmore, formerly of the Lex- 
ington Players and the Poll forces, is 
managing the company. 



GLECKLER ENGAGED FOR BD'WY 

Robert P. Gleckler, who for six or seven 
years has played leads in stock in the 
various big cities of the country, is to make 
his first appearance on Broadway next 
tall in "Mother Carey's Chickens" opposite 
Mabel Taliaferro. It will open at the Cort, 
early in September. 



MURRAYS ARE RESTING 

Wildwood, N. J., June 16. — Mr. and 
Mrs. Malcolm Murray, professionally 
known as Mai Murray and Marie Fischer, 
are in their Lake Boad bungalow in Wild- 
wood-by-the-Sea for the Summer, after 
closing a season in stock. 



LILLIAN HALL TAKES VACATION 

Schutlervuxe. N. Y.. June 18. — Lil- 
lian Hall (Mrs. Charles Hammond) has 
closed a season of forty-two weeks with 
tbe Gladys Klark Stock Co. and is having 
a vacation here with her two-year-old 
daughter, Ruth. 



RAIN DESTROYS TENT OUTFIT 

Clinton, 111., Jnne 16. — The Fred Gor- 
don Dramatic Co. was struck by a big 
storm last week and the tent outfit was 
destroyed. The company had to finish the 

week in the theatre until the new outfit 
was secured. 



STOCK GIVES TWILIGHT SHOW 

Cincinnati, June 16. — A "twilight per- 
formance" is an innovation put on at the 
Zoo by the Devereaux Players. The per- 
formance begins at 5:30 p. m. and is pnt 
on in the open-air Woodland Theatre. 



EDITH TALIAFERRO WITH STOCK 

Edith Taliaferro has gone to Toronto, 
Can., where she will appear in the stellar 
role in the production of a new comedy 
which will be tried out by the Edward H. 
Robins Stock Co. at tbe Royal Alexandra 
Theatre. The play is by Sarle Brown, 
and entitled "Annabel Lee" and, if suc- 
cessful, will be pnsented here next Fall. 



GLASER LEAVING PITTSBURGH 

PmSBtracn. June IS. — The Vaughan 
Glaser Stock Co. is in its last fortnight at 
the Alvin Theatre, the company closing 
June 30. For the farewell week of tho 
season "St. Elmo" will be presented. "All 
on Account of Eliza" is the attraction this 
week. 



SUE MacMANAMY STAYS WEST 

Los Angeles, June 15. — Sue MacMa- 
namy did not close with tbe Morosco 
Stock Co. last Saturday as she intended, 
but will continue as a member of that or- 
ganization for the rest of tbe Summer. 
She bad planned to come East. 

KETCHUMS TAKING VACATION 

Fremont, Mich., June 17. — Raymond 
Ketcnum and wife, Sara Tread well, have 
closed their sixth solid year with the Chase 
Lester Co. and are spending u much needed 
vacation of six weeks at Mr. Ketchum's 
home here. 

MANY PERFORMERS AT WILDWOOD 

Wildwood,' N. J., June 18. — This town 
is becoming quite a colony for theatrical 
folk. Among those now here for the Sum- 
mer and owning homes are Mr. and Mrs. 
N. C. Dorente, of the Ernie Marks Reper- 
toire Co. : Mr. and Mrs. Bert Johnson, of 
the Chicago Stock Co. ; Charles Ross. K am 
and family, owner and manager of the 
Chicago Stock Co.; Earle T. Western, of 
the Knickerbocker Stock Co., recently 
closed in Philadelphia, and Mr. and' Mrs. 
Malcolm Murray, of the Turner-Hammond 
Stock Co. 



STROLLED ABOUT IN "NIGHTY" 

RrvEBHEAD, L. I., June 18. — Witnesses 
in the will contest over the estate of 
Tvette, testified that the conduct of the 
testator bad been erratic for some time 
before her death. A witness testified she 
paraded about her estate clad only in a 
nightgown. The contestant is Stephen 
Cordill, a brother, to whom $100 was de- 
vised in the will, which left $80,000 to a 
hospital. In private life tbe testator was 
known as Mrs. May Rook. 



ASKS $25,000 FOR ACTOR'S DEATH 

John A. and Virginia G. Dockery, 
brother and sister of the late Clair E. 
Dockery, a Hippodrome performer, have 
instituted an action in the Supreme Court 
against the Cranford Company, subway 
contractors, asking $25,000 damages for 
the loss of the actor's life. Dockery was 
killed in a Brooklyn subway excavation on 
April 17. Other suits are to follow, one 
being against the City of New York. 



PAULINE LEROY WITH OLIVER 

Richmond, Ind.. Jnne 16. — Pauline Le- 
Roy has joined the Otis Oliver Players. 



ANNA HELD MUST PAY $1,328 

A jury in the Supreme Court has 
awarded a verdict of $1,328 against Anna 
Held, to Eugene Kaufmann, who alleged 
the amount was due for engagements se- 
cured by him for her. He sued for $1,528. 
The defense of Miss Held was that Kauf- 
mann had done her a personal favor and 
that she did not enter into any business 
agreement with him. 

MICH. CIRCUIT OPENS AUG. 12 

Chicago, June 18. — The bouses in four 
of the principal cities on the Michigan 
Circuit will inaugurate their Fall vaude- 
ville season on Ang. 12. Chas. Crowl. of 
the Chicago, TJ.B.O. offices is handling 
the bookings. They will play films during 
the Summer. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 




JWIW 




GEO. SUN, OWNER 

OF CIRCUS 

IS DEAD 

LAST YEARS SPENT IN RETIREMENT 



Hot Springs, Ark., June IS. — George 
Son, original proprietor in conjunction 
with his brothers, John and Gus, of the 
Son . Brothers Great United Shows, died 
here yesterday. He had lived in retirement 
daring the past few years, spending his 
Winters here and his Summers in Toledo, 
O. 

A cripple for thirty-three years, daring 
the last year his suffering was intensified 
by complications, and daily he battled with 
the courage of a martyr. 

He leaves a wife, a son and two daugh- 
ters, also a mother, three brothers, Gas, 
Pete and John, and three Bisters, Louise, 
Amelia and Lena. The funeral was pri- 
vate and held in Toledo yesterday, and was 
attended by the members of the family and 
a few close friends. 

George Son, as be was known to all 
circus men, was born in Toledo, March 
19, 1862. The family name was Klotz, 
bUt later, for professional usage, the other 
and better known name was adopted. At 
an early age, his father died and George 
was obliged to leave school and commence 
a battle for existence as well as assist in 
the support of his mother. At the age of 
eleven he secured work as a teamster and 
later became a brass finisher. 

Daring his shop apprenticeship he prac- 
ticed juggling, following the lead of his 
elder brother John, who was achieving con- 
siderable, success. The. following year he 
joined the Charles Andress Gift show and 
a year later found him one of the feature 
attractions' .of the P. T. Barnaul Circus, 
opening at Madison Square Garden, New 
York. 

After completing the Beason with this 
organization he returned again to the An- 
dress Show and it was during this engage- 
ment that he suffered the accident that 
left him a cripple for the rest of his life, 
with the exception of a brief space of time 
when temporary cure was effected in Hot 
Springs. He was injured while making 
the leaps which resulted in paralysis of 
both limbs. After the temporary cure at 
Hot Springs he suffered a relapse and from 
that time never experienced any relief. 

On his return to Toledo, a benefit was 
arranged and, by mere chance, it was sug- 
gested that he be placed on a table and 
that he do a few of his juggling tricks. 
The offering was a decided hit and, after 
he had fonnd that he could still present his 
juggling act despite his affliction, he was 
offered an engagement in the principal va- 
riety theatres of that time and played an 
entire season. 

The following year he took out a small 
variety road show known as Sun's Phan- 
tasms, which traveled ont of Detroit and 
toured the one-night stands. Later this 
show wss considerably enlarged and ap- 
peared in the more prominent theatres. In 
1892, in conjunction with his brothers, 
John and Gus, he established Sun 
Brothers Great United Shows. This show 
growing year by year traveled by wagon 
for the first ten years and then became a 
railroad circus. In 1898, one brother Gas, 
disposed of his interests and the younger 
brother Pete became a stockholder. 

In 1912, after thirty-three years of toil 
and hardship he had made a success of the 
circus and had made a fortune. It was 
during this year that he decided to retire 
from active work and disposed of his in- 
terests to Gus. After his retirement he 
toured America and Europe, and later con- 
ceived the idea of putting out the first auto 
track circus and had practically completed 
his plans when complications in his phys- 
ical condition made him abandon his pro- 
ject. 



TRAINER SENTENCED FOR CRUELTY 

Boston, Juni 18. — Carnival and circus 
men and all animal trainers will be inter- 
ested in the case of Ernest Albera, recently 
arrested on a charge of cruelty to animals, 
when his appeal comes up in October in 
the Plymouth County Superior Court. The 
result will be of interest to showmen inso- 
far as they will find out how far a trainer 
can go in the business of training animals. 

Albera, who haa been staging the 
"World's Champion Diving Elks" at Para- 
gon Park, Nantasket Beach, this season, 
was sentenced to three months in the 
House of Correction on a charge of cruelty 
to animals last week before Judge George 
W. Kelley at Higham, The Massachusetts 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals was the complainant. 

Testimony was adduced to the effect 
that Albera forced Elks to dive from a 
stage to a lagoon forty feet below. It was 
contended that an elk is a timid animal and 
such a jump is a shock. Witnesses said 
they saw the defendant strike the animals 
with a rattan, to make them jump and, 
when that did not work, that he had pushed 
them off. 

Albera testified that he had been an 
animal trainer for twenty-five years and 
had trained ■ ontmniq in the London Hip- 
podrome and some of the largest circus 
arenas in the United States. He said he 
had never been arrested before for cruelty. 

Albers appealed from the sentence and 
was held in $300 bail for the October term 
of the Plymouth County Superior Court, 



LUNA HAS NEW ATTRACTION 

Luna, Coney Island's big amusement 
park and the birthplace of most of 
the world's greatest amusement park fea- 
tures, has had frequent additions to the 
list of novelties since the opening day, bnt 
one of the most promising is "A Worm's 
Eye View," an illusion which received its 
initial presentation last week. In "A 
Worm's Eye View" is represented the 
dream of a retired Colonel, depicting the 
wanderings and vagaries of a sub-conscious 
mind during a noonday siesta. 



MIDGET FALLS FROM TRAIN 

Altoona, Pa., June 16. — Elsie Boeck, 
known as "Queenie Mite," the thirty-inch 
midget of the Johnny 3. Jones Exposition 
Shows, is confined to the Altoona Hospital 
as a result of injuries sustained when she 
fell from a fast moving train at Emporium. 
Her injuries are not as serious as they 
were first thought to be. She escaped with 
a bruised shoulder, lacerated left arm and 
scratches about the face. She is expected 
to recover within a few days. 



SPELLMAN HAS BREAKDOWN 

Word comes from the office of Frank P. 
Spellman that their chief is rather seriously 
ill in Toledo, Ohio, as the result of a 
nervous breakdown. In the meantime, 
plans for the motorized circus, which, ac- 
cording to last advices, was supposed to 
take to the road on or about June 15, seem 
to be at a standstill. 



HEWITT QUITS WORLD AT HOME 

Chicago, June 16. — William Judkins 
Hewitt (Red Onion) arrived at Chicago 
last week, having closed as publicity agent 
with the World at Home Shows at Aber- 
deen, S. D. He will continue on to New 
York. 



ARTHUR DAVIS IN CHICAGO 

Chicago, June 18. — Arthur Davis, con- 
tracting agent for the Campbell Shows, is 
in this city contracting for the appearance 
of his carnival in Chicago and surrounding 
towns. 

COSMOPOLITAN SHOWS CANCEL 

Terre Haute, Ind., June 16. — The Great 
Cosmopolitan Shows cancelled this week at 
West Terre Haute going instead to Hills- 

boro, IU. 

ED CARRUTHERS IS HERE 

Ed Carruthers, of Chicago, is paying 
New York a business visit. 



ROCKFORD PUTS 

TAX ON CIRCUS 

PARADES 

$100 CHARGE FOR LICENSE 



Rockfobd, 111., Jane 16. — All circuses 
visiting Rockford will have to pay an addi- 
tional tax of one hundred dollars if they 
wish to bold a street parade. 

Heretofore, a license to exhibit cost a 
circus, charging fifty cents admission, one 
hundred dollars. But the city council 
claimed this was not sufficient and incor- 
porated in the amusement ordinance an 
extra charge of one hundred dollars for the 
parade privilege, making two hundred dol- 
lars, in all, for a license. 

It is not known yet how this plan will 
work out as no circus has visited here this 
season. 

The contracting agent for the Barnum & 
Bailey Circus was here several days ago to 
take out a license for the appearance of 
that show Aug. 8, when the additional tax 
was made known. It is doubtful whether, 
with the extra imposition circuses will find 
it worth while to show here, and it is not 
unlikely that they will pass up Rockford 
altogether, rather than eliminate the parade, 
which is a feature of their performance. 

If the Barnum & Bailey Show takes that 
action, this town is not likely to see any 
circuses for years to come, or at least until 
the tax for the parade, which they feel is 
unjust, is recalled by the city council. 



RUTH LAW HAS NARROW ESCAPE 

Lexington, 111., June 16. — Ruth Law 
narrowly escaped death early last Thurs- 
day evening, when the gasoline tank in her 
aeroplane exploded and set fire to the ma- 
chine, while 2,000 feet in the air above this 
city. Miss Law was en route from St. Louis 
to Chicago. She pointed the nose of the 
machine straight down and descended with 
such velocity that the wind blew ont the 
blaze. She landed safely on the outskirts 
of Lexington, uninjured but slightly burned 
about her face.. 



MOBILE BUYS FAIR GROUNDS 

Mobile, Ala., June 16. — The fair, 
grounds, on which the Gulf Coast Fair As- 
sociation will hold its fair October 22-28, 
are now owned by the city of Mobile, pa- 
pers having been signed and transferred 
last week. The purchase price is said to 
have been $15,000. The fair grounds will 
be rented each year from the city at a 
stipulated rate. This plan is said to have 
been mutually agreed upon. 



U. S. TAKES JONES MUSICIANS 

Altoona, Pa., June 16. — Three members 
of the band with the Johnny J. Jones Ex- 
position Shows, at the conclusion of the 
engagement on the carnival grounds here 
to-night, win be accepted by the Third 

Regiment, National Guard of the United 
States Band. Members of the carnival 
band were examined at headquarters 
earlier in the week. 



ABORNS TO OPEN IN NEWARK 

Newark, N. J., June 18. — The Aborn 
Light Opera Co. win begin the regular sea- 
son at Olympic Park, the first week in 
July. In the company will be Fritzi Von 
Busing, Forrest Huff, Robinson Newbold, 
George Shields and Maude Gray, a new 
leading soprano, who will make her first 
appearance here. 



COOK SHOW HAS BREAKDOWN 

Caknoksbitbg. Pa., June 15. — Last Tues- 
day the Cook Bros. Show, leaving Brook- 
viUe for Ford City, had a break down of 
one of the trucks on the flat car, which 
delayed the starting of the matinee until 
five o'clock. 



ELKS CHANGE CONVENTION PLANS 

Boston, June 15. — The Boston National 
Elks Convention Association has decided 
to eliminate the usual parade daring the 
convention to be held there next month, 
and has substituted a great patriotic dem- 
onstration to be held on Boston Common 
instead. In place of the ball, that had 
been planned, there will be given a special 
performance of "Caliban." It has also 
been decided not to erect the $25,000 Court 
of Honor, in deference to the general feel- 
fog that all extravagant display he 
eliminated. The trip over the Paul Re- 
vere route, and other outings and side 
trips wOl be given according to schedule. 



HOLYOKE CASINO OPENS 

Holyoke, Mass., June 18. — Mountain 
Park Casino, which is operated by the 
Holyoke Street Railway Co., nnder the di- 
rection of Fred Sarr, inaugn ated its Sum- 
mer season here to-day. The Casino has 
been enlaiged and now seats 2,200 persons. 
It wiU remain open for a period of twelve 
weeks and play acts for a week period with 
two shows a day. The opening bill is com- 
posed of Aski, Ed. and Irene Lowry, Ma- 
bel McDonald, Pall Mall Trio, the Carl 
Eugene Troupe and The Five Musical 
Hodges'. 

VAUDE. HOUSE TO PLAY LEGIT. 

Saginaw, Mich., June 18. — Owing to 
the fire that destroyed the Academy of 
Music, the Fran! lin theatre will house 

the dramatic shows here next season. 
Klaw & Erlanger & Shubert attractions 
are to be presented. It has played vaude- 
ville heretofore. 



GORDON CALVITT JOINS ARMY 

Celina, O., June 16. — Gordon Calvitt, 
press representative with the L. J. Heth 
Shows last season and secretary-treasurer 
with the Campbell's United Shows this 
season, has quit the show business and 
joined the army corps here. 



CLIFTON KELLY SHOWS HAS FIRE 

Clinton, Ind., June 16. — The Clifron- 
KeUy Shows bad a small fire while show- 
ing here recently, which stopped the cir- 
culation of the Ferris Wheel. For a time 
there was much excitement. The blaze 
was soon extinguished. 

NEW DEVICES FOR WOODSIDE 
PmT.ArnTr.PHiA June 18. — Many "new de- 
vices are now being built for Woodside 
Park, which recently experienced a fire, 
that destroyed forty-five per cent, of the 
amusements. The park has not lost a 
day in spite of the fire. 



KENNEDY GIVES TO WAR RELIEF 

Philadelphia, June 18. — The Con T. 
Kennedy Carnival Show, after showing a 
week at Broad and Oregon Avenue,' starts 
to-day its second and final week in the 
northeastern section of the town. The pro- 
ceeds are going to British war sufferers. 

APPROPRIATION FOR FAIR BLDG. 

Sacramento, Cal., June 15. — A hill bu 
been signed by Governor Stephens for the 
appropriaton of $30,000 for the construc- 
tion of a new exhibit building at the Cali- 
fornia State Fair grounds to replace the 
one destroyed by fire last season. 



CIRCUS LOT IS SOLD 

Terse Haute, Ind., June 16. — The Bar- 
num & Bailey circus win show at the fair 
grounds next Friday, the old circus lot, 
used for the last twenty years, having been 
sold for residence purposes. 



KENYON MANAGING PARK 

St. Joseph, Mo., June 16. — Omer J- 
Kenyon, of the Lyceum Theatre staff, for- 
merly contracting agent of the Hagenbeck- 
Wallace Circus, is now business manager 
of Lake Contrary Park. 



June 20. 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 
35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 



CHICAGO 



FOR ADVERTISING 

RATES 
Phone Randolph 5423 



STOCK REVIVAL 

AT WILSON 

POPULAR 

SUCCESS OF VENTURE A SURPRISE 



With the closing of the regular drama- 
tic season and the starting of the Summer, 
the stock company at the Wilson Ave. 
Theatre, is attracting much attention. 

Herman Lieb opened the company Jane 
4 with "Seven Keys to Baldpate," fol- 
lowed by "A Full House" and, although 
he originally intended the engagement to 
last four weeks, the first two weeks have 
proved so successful that It is likely the 
company will continue all Summer. 

The return of stock to this city has 
excited more than ordinary interest. The 
venture was at first looked upon with 
skepticism, as it was thought that stock 
had been forever supplanted by the mo- 
tion pictures. 

The house has been sold out at every 
performance and, aa an evidence of Its 
popularity, the patronage Is not confined 
to the immediate vicinity. 

A well known editor here has called the 
revival of stock an impetus to drama. He 
said in part that "the extinction of the 
stock company not only hurt the poor, 
old drama, bat it darned near rained it, 
because the stock company was the 
best training ground that the drama 
had. . . ." The return of stock com- 
panies will not only again interest the 
public in the spoken drama, but it will 
reopen the school in which the recruiting 
officers of the spoken drama got intensive 
training in its most intensive form. 

The present company at the Wilson 
Ave. includes Mitchell Harris and Mar- 
guerite Hertz in the leading roles and, in 
their support, are James Guy-Usher, Her- 
man Lrieb, Walter Dickinson, Louis Bar- 
ters, Arthur Helman, Allan Ramsay, 
Chester Beach, Hollister Pratt, Evelyn 
Walls, Ruth Towle and Esther Howard. 

ACTRESS SISTERS SUE CAFE 

Irene and Alice Palmer, twins and ac- 
tresses, have filed suit in the Superior 
Court, through their attorney, Charles E. 
Erbstein, against Stumer, Rosenthal, Eck- 
stein and Nnsbaum, proprietors of the Cafe 
Royale, for $20,000 damages. 

The Misses Palmer allege that, on June 
S, they visited the cafe accompanied by 
two gentlemen escorts who left the place 
soon after, and, not returning, the girls 
were asked to leave by the management. 
Irene formerly played the part of "Intoxi- 
cation" in "Experience," but declares she 
never indulges off the stage. 

JAMES TO HANDLE CHOOS ACTS 

Fred and Marie James motored to New 
York and back, making the trip from 
Chicago without accident last week. The 
energies of the pair were devoted to land- 
ing girl acts for the middle West the com- 
ing season and a deal was closed by which 
Marie James will handle the George Choos 
acts for the Chicago territory. 



"FOLLIES" CAST PATRIOTIC 

Practically the entire cast of "Garden 
Follies" at White City, have offered their 
services to the Red Cross. 

Will Higgle, the dancer, registered on 
June 5 and plans to join the medical corps 
of the U. S. A. at the expiration of his 
present contract with the White City 
Amusement Co. Olive Christian, Elsie 
Cole, Jacqueline Tallman, Dolly Burnham, 
Bobby Boles and Dolly Ayres, were among 
the first of the girls to make application 
to the Red Cross to become nurses. 



VAUDE. AT COLONIAL AUG. 15 

Jones, Iinick and Schaefer will put 
vaudeville into the Colonial on August 16, 
discontinuing the policy of feature pictures 
which is now in force there. Norman 
Field will be manager and Frank Doyle 
will book the acts. 



ACTOR SUES LAWYER 

Adolph Marks, a professional attorney, 
is defendant in a civil action for false ar- 
rest brought last week by Edward Kane, 
an actor, of the team of Kane and Her- 
man, for $25,000 damages. Harry Smitz 
is also named in that suit. Leon Berez- 
niak is representing Kane. 



FORMING NEW SKATING ACT 

Earl Reynolds and Nellie Donegan are 
organizing a new skating act to be called 
the Persian Models Ice Ballet. It will 
open on a vaudeville route in August. 
Helen Reynolds will be a third principal 
member of the team, which will also in- 
clude ten girls. 

ACTRESS BROTHER AT FRONT 

Mae Curtis received word from her 
brother, Jack Morrissey, the other day, 
stating that he was on his way to the 
fighting lines in France under General 
Pershing. He is a member of Company 
E, Eighteenth Infantry, of Illinois. 



COLORED ACTS WARNED 

Blackface, black and white and minstrel 
acts are warned to keep away from the 
vicinity of East St Louis, owing to the 
recent riots there against negroes. All 
agents having booked such attractions for 
that place have rearranged their routes. 



"DOLLARS AND SENSE" REMAINS 

Alan Brooks, who was to have left Chi- 
cago after playing out last week at the 
Garrick Theatre in "Dollars and Sense," 
changed theatres with "The Pawn" at- 
traction and moved into the Princess 
Monday for an indefinite stay. 

ED. LA ZF.tl.F. RETIRES 
Ed. La Zelle, for twenty-two years a 
well-known slack wire walker and jug- 
gler, has retired from active stage duties 
to engage in the pawn brokerage busi- 
ness. He has purchased the North Star 
Loan Bank. 



LYCEUM HAS TWO NEW ONES 

C. A. Grimm, of the Lyceum Music Co., 
announces two new "war" songs in "Let's 
Fight for the U. S. A." and "In the Good 
Old C. S." both giving promise of landing 
among the present popular soldier num- 
bers. 



ALOHA'S BAND IS ENGAGED 

Hattie Aloha's Lady Hawaiian Band 
has been engaged for the summer season 
at Glenn Park, Sheridan, 111., and will be- 
gin playing the engagement about July 1, 
if the weather permits. 



HULTZ IS IN TEXAS 

Dick Hultz, formerly located in Chicago, 
is now producing at the Lyric Theatre, 

Kl Paso, Tex., succeeding W. F. Bowker, 
who has been shifted to the Majestic 
there. 



MISS HOFFMAN AIDS HOSPITAL 

Gertrude Hoffman, while in this city, 
visited the American Hospital and, after 
her visit, endowed a ward at the institu- 
tion. It will bear her name. 



THEATRE FOLK 

AID FAMILIES 

OF JACKIES 

RAISE FUND OF $6,000 



CHICAGO TO HAVE THEATRE CLUB 

Mort Singer is authority for the state- 
ment that arrangements are under way for 

the formation of a new theatrical club on 
the order of the Friars or Lambs, and that 
negotiations are pending with G. M. Grant 
to secure his services to organize it. The 
club's headquarters will occupy an entire 
floor of the new theatre building to be 
erected by Messrs. Beck and Meyerfeld. 
the Kohl family and Singer. 



More than a score of prominent the- 
atrical people aided the Chicago Examiner 
last week in giving a benefit for the 
families of local men who have enlisted 
in the United States Navy, and it was 
conceded to be one of the best comedy 
bills ever presented in this city. 

The performance, which netted more 
than $6,000, was given at Cohan's Grand 
Opera House, and was supervised by 
George Kingsbury. 

There were twenty acts on the bill and 
the show, which started at 1:30, was 
more than four hours' long. It was 
brought to a hurrah finish by John Philip 
Sousa and his band from the Great Lakes 
Naval Training Station. 

A Marine vocal trio started the ball 
rolling, and then followed Charlotte, the 
skater, who danced; the Long Tack Sam 
Troupe of Chinese acrobats; Reynolds 
and Donegan, an act from "The Pawn," 
with Frank Keenan and a capable cast; 
Elizabeth Murray and Cecil Cunningham, 
Helen Lackaye and company, in "Good 
Fishing"; J arrow, Alan Brooks, Willett 
Kershaw and A. H. Van Buren, from the 
Garrick; the Hawaiian Quintette from 
"The Bird of Paradise"; Emma Carus 
and Larry Comer, Carroll McComas, from 
"Seven Chances"; Marilyn Miller and 
Alexis Kosloff, Howard and Howard, and 
White and Clayton from "The Show of 
Wonders"; Doraldina, and the first act 
of "Turn to the Right." 

Selling flowers about the lobby and 
theatre were Grace Goodhnll, Justine 
Adams, Vivian Pell and Cordelia Mac- 
Donald, of the "Dollars and Sense" com- 
pany, and Olive Carroll, Gertrude Wagner 
and Esther Smith, of "Seven Chances," 
while Emily Calloway, Sarah Shields, 
Mildred Post and Beverly West, also of 
the "Seven Chances" cast, disposed of the 
programs. 

Following the performance the Naval 
Band, under command of Sousa, marched 
to the Bismarck Hotel, where the Jaeldes 
were the guests of Carl Eitel and Emil 
Dannie. 



RIALTO SHOWS KETTERING ACT 

Occupying headline position on the bill 
at the Rialto Theatre the current week is 
a brand new playlet, entitled "Tour Own 
Bed," from the pen of Ralph T. Kettering, 
press representative for the Jones, Linick 
and Schaefer Theatres. It is a comedy 
and is played by Catherine Dean, Ward 
Cassidy and Miss Glenn Porter. 



SINGER DENIES RUMORS 

Upon the return to Chicago recently of 
Mort H. Singer, head of the Western 
Vaudeville Managers' Association, he an- 
nounced that the rumors circulated during 
his visit to New York concerning the 
abandoning of the erection of the proposed 
new theatre at Lake and State Streets, 
were erroneous. 



EMPRESS TO CLOSE 

The Empress Theatre, vaudeville and 
pictures, will be dark August 1 for three 
weeks, to permit interior decorations and 
repairs to be made. 

ASHTON TO PRODUCE 

Harry Asbton, the vaudeville writer, 
bos taken charge of Marconi Hall and 
will produce musical tabloids and dra- 
matic attractions. 



KEDZIE AVE. CLOSED 

The Kedzie Avenue Theatre, under the 
management of Gus Bunge, closed for the 
Summer months after the benefit per- 
formance given for the medical corps of 
the First Illinois Infantry, at which $600 
was realized. 



PISANO TO URGE RECRUITING 

Gen. Pisano, the sharpshooter, who re- 
cently broke with his agent, Lew Earl, in 
the Majestic Theatre Building, will return 
to vaudeville June 24, at English's O. H., 
Indianapolis. He plans to give free rifle 
instructions to recruits after each matinee 
enroute, and has sent letters to that effect 
to President Wilson and the various gov- 
ernors of cities on his route sheet. 



SPRING NEW MILITARY SONG 

"Miss Liberty, in Khaki, You Know 
We're All for You," is the title of a new 
military number, written by Raymond 
Midgley and Harry Kelly that was put on 
in the "Garden Follies" show at White 
City last week. The entire company wear 
Khaki uniforms, and appear to be the first 
to do it around Chicago. 

WEATHER BOOMS PARKS 

The Summer weather of last week 
boomed business at the three local parks. 

Early in the week the patronage began 
picking up and became better and better 
as the week passed by. The managers of all 
attractions were very pleased and began 
laying plans for a rush of business this 
week. 



GARRITY IS AT PALACE 

John Garrity is in managerial harness 
again as representative of the Messrs. 
Shuberfs' Winter Garden "Show of Won- 
ders," now playing a summer engagement 
at the Palace Theatre. ' 



LILLIAN DREW VISITS CHICAGO 

Lillian R. Drew, of the Clayton-Drew 
Players, arrived in Chicago last week, the 
company having closed the season the week 
before at Fair Haven, N. J. Miss Drew 
and her husband will spend the Summer at 
their home at Lake Minnstoka, Minn. 



STEWARD MANAGING PALACE 

Earl Steward, for eight years manager 
of the 8am S. Shubert Theatre in ir«n W » 
City, and last year manager of the Ma- 
jestic Theatre, in Milwaukee, has been ap- 
pointed by Mort H. Singer manager of the 
Palace Music Hall. 



PEARL LEVEE MANAGING INDIANA 

Since Walter Meakln took over the man- 
agement of the Logan Square Theatre, for 
J. R. Thompson, the Indiana, has been un- 
der the management of Pearl Levee, and 
continues to be booked through the W. V. 
M. A. offices. 



R. C CARLISLE LOSES MOTHER 
Mrs. S. A Carlisle, mother of R. C. 
Carlisle, a Chicago showman, died on May 
20. Two other children survive her. The 
interment was at Mount Washington 
Cemetery, Missouri. 



DELMORE ft MOORE GO WEST 

_ Delmore and Moore stopped off in the 
city last week en route for their home in 
Oakland, Cal., where they will Summer. 
They are preparing a new act for next Fall. 



TRANSFIELD SISTERS CLOSE 

The Transfield Sisters closed their sea- 
son at . McVicker's, here, and left im- 
mediately, as members of the Billy Reeves 
party, for Paw Paw Lake. 



STRONG MAN WEDS ACTRESS 
Orville Stamm, the young Hercules, and 
Betty Caldwell, were married in this city 
last week. 



EVA LEUTHOLD IN HOSPITAL 

Eva Leuthold, formerly In the chorus at 
the Winter Garden, is III in a local hos- 
pital. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 





SHEET MUSIC DEALERS 
WOULD MAKE CHANGES 



National Association Recommend* New 

Size Sheet and a Raise in the Retail 

Price of Popular Prints 

■ After recommending several important 
changes in the sheet music business, the 
National Association of Sheet Music 
Dealers brought their fourth annual con- 
vention to a close at the Hotel McAlpin 
last week. Attended by about one hun- 
dred and fifty delegates, from practically 
every section of the Union, the members 
took up matters vital to their business 
and recommended several innovations. 

The question of improving conditions in 
the popular sheet music business so that 
all dealers would find it desirable to han- 
dle this class of business seemed to be the 
paramount matter before the delegates. 
The convention decided to recommend a 
change in the classifications of popular 
sheet music and, in the language of then- 
secretary, B.- W. Heffelfinger, "would like 
to put that business on a more legitimate 
basis." The dealers have appointed a 
committee to take up the matter with a 
committee of publishers, and conferences 
will be -held in the near future. 

The delegates also decided to recom- 
mend a new size of sheet music and would 
substitute 9% z 12V4 sheets in lieu of the 
present 11 x 14 size. 

The association has decided to compile 
a list of important German musical pub- 
lications which tbey intend to have re- 
printed by concerted action so that tbey 
will always be available. The right to 
publish these numbers will be divided 
equally among the various publishers who 
print this class of music. 

The following officers were elected for 
the ensuing year: President, Charles W. 
Homey er, of Boston; vice-president, Paul 
A. Schmitt, of Minneapolis; secretary 
and treasurer, E_ W. Heffelfinger, of Los 
Angeles. 

Two dinners were given to the visiting 
delegates. One was tendered by the 
Greater New York Music Dealers and 
' Publishers' Association at Thwaites, City 
Island, and marked the first time that 
popular and standard music publishers 
and dealers had all assembled around the 
same festive board. The other dinner was 
given at the Hotel Astor, with the music 
publishers as hosts. 

The next convention of the association 
will be held in New York City next June. 

A committee appointed to confer with 
the publishers called a meeting on Fri- 
day morning at which a request to raise 
the price on popular sheet music was 
made. If granted, this would automati- 
cally remove. the popular prints from the 
5 and 10 cent stores and place the retail- 
ing of all sheet music entirely in the 
hands of the music dealer. 

The request was not granted, several 
of the publishers stating that they were 
unalterably opposed to the raising of the 
price on popular music, and that while 
the big syndicate stores undoubtedly in 
many instances hurt the business of the 
small dealer, their trade was bo large that 
it could not be sacrificed. 



BALL'S SONG AT LAMBS' GAMBOL 

John McConnack, the Irish tenor was 
the bis feature of the Lambs' All Star 
Gambol- held on Sunday evening at the 
Manhattan. He sang five songs everyone 
of which was applauded to the echo. The 
most popular one, however, judging from 
its reception was Ernest R. Ball's "Mother 
Maehree." 



BYWAY'S PATRIOTIC SONG 

One of the most widely featured songs 
of all the patriotic numbers published 
during the past few months, is "What 
irfawl of An American Are YouT" an ex- 
ceptionally well written song in the 
Broadway Music Corp. catalogue. 



THE W1TMARK FAVORITES 

Fully realizing that the choice of popu- 
lar novelties should be both numerous and 
varied, the firm of M. Witmark & Sons 
have this summer a live catalog of popu- 
lar favorites sufficient not only to cater 
to but to thoroughly satisfy all manner of 
tastes and preferences. To those who 
must have a popular ballad — and they 
are legion — what can equal the immense 
popularity of "All the World Will Be 
Jealous of Me"? If it be a patriotic song 
with the real, genuine ring to it, what is 
more to the public taste than such songs 
as "Your Country Needs You Now" and 
"The Story of Old Glory, the Flag We 
Love." Do you want a song with the 
Oriental flavor t There is Walter Donald- 
son's unusually tuneful "Suki San." It 
is a laugh-getter you seek! There are 
more laughs to the line in "My Yiddisha 
Butterfly" than any other song we know 
■ of just now. Or, how about a. "rube" song 
that is "different"! Here you have it in 
"When He's All Dolled Up," one of the 
best songs of its kind published in a dec- 
ade. "I've Got the Sweetest Girl in 
Maryland" is a Donaldson favorite hard 
to excel. la it an Irish song you hanker 
after? Surely, then, "The House of Irish 
Hits" can satisfy that craving. It cer- 
tainly can, for "Somewhere in Ireland," 
the latest J. Keirn Brennan and Ernest R. 
Ball, is also one of their beet, which is 
saying all that's necessary. If songs of 
the popular standard type are wanted, 
M. witmark & Sons offer an almost end- 
less choice. Chief among them, of course, 
are those two remarkable ballads, "There's 
a Long, Long Trail," the international 
classic, and "The Magic of Your Eyes," 
which is, indeed, the ballad beautiful if 
there ever, was one. Without a doubt, 
the seeker after successful songs hasn't 
far to go, for the professional rooms of 
M. Witmark & Sons are mightily con- 
venient — right next door to the Palace 
Theatre. 



RICHMOND'S PATRIOTIC SONG 

Maurice Richmond has one of the most 
popular patriotic songs of the year in 
the old George M. Cohan song hit "You're 
a Grand Old Flag." The manner in which 
the singers are reviving this hit of over 
a decade ago is particularly gratifying to 
Mr. Richmond, who purchased it a few 
years ago more for sentimental reasons 
than any expectation of realizing a profit. 
Several other Cohan numbers purchased 
at the same time are also attracting at- 
tention. 



ELLIS FEATURES "OVER THERE" 

Harry Ellis, the tenor, was the singer 
at the benefit base ball game given on 
Sunday at the Polo Grounds for the First 
Reserve Engineer Regiment. Accompanied 
by a band of 100 pieces Mr. Ellis effect- 
ively rendered the new George M. Cohan 
song "Over There." 

NEW SET OF OFFICERS 

The National Music Publishers' Associa- 
tion in convention last week elected the 
following officers for the coming year: 
Clarence G. Woodman, president; Walter 
S. Fischer, vice-president, and Edward T. 
Paull, secretary and treasurer. 

The association, now twenty-two years 
old, has had but four presidents. 



COMPOSERS COLLECTING 

According to Nathan Burkan, attorney 
for the Society of Authors, Composers and 
Publishers, the new organization, is col- 
lecting over $50,000 a year for the use 
of the works of its members in New York 
and vicinity alone. Before the year's end 
the society expects to collect over $250,000 
a year. 

ASSOCIATION BUYS BOND 

The National Association of Music 
Publishers in convention last week voted 
to purchase a $500 Liberty Loan Bond. 



FLYNN SINGS FOR SOLDIERS 

' "Jimmy" Flynn, of the Leo Feist 
forces, has been doing his "bit" by sing- 
ing for the soldiers in the armories of 
New York and near-by cities. 

In appreciation of his services he has 
received letters from Mayor Mitchell as 
well as several others from the mayors 
and officials of a number of the near-by 
towns in New York and New Jersey. 

Mr. Flynn has been featuring "Where Do 
We Go From Here?" and *T Called You 
My Sweetheart," and Mayor Griffin of 
Hoboken wrote him, "I cannot allow the 
occasion to pass unnoticed, and take this 
opportunity to express my sincere thanks 
for your kindness and feel sure that those 
who were fortunate enough to hear you 
last evening will long remember the rare 
.entertainment you furnished." 



SHARPS AND FLATS 

By TEDDY MORSE. 



MAX SILVER WITH EDWARDS 

Max Silver, for many years with the 
F. A. Mills publishing house, is now con- 
nected with the Gus Edwards Music Co., 
in the capacity of general manager. The 
catalogue of the Edwards Company will 
be increased by the addition of a num- 
ber of new songs from the pen of Mr. 
Edwards as well as outside writers, and 
an aggressive plan of popularization will 
be immediately adopted. 



OLD SONG COMES BACK BIG 

According to reports from the office of 
Charles K. Harris, "Break the News to 
Mother" is on its way to repeating its 
former popularity. Jimmie Shea has in- 
corporated this number in Ms act, and 
finds it a big applause getter. Dave Har- 
ris is another performer who has adopted 
this number, and is finding it. to be a 
winner. 



EIGHT KERN MUSICAL SHOWS 

Jerome D. Kern has signed contracts 
by the terms of which he is to supply 
the score for eight musical shows to be 
presented next season. 

The great success achieved by "Very 
Good, Eddie," "Oh, Boy!" and other of 
his productions has made him one of the 
most sought after writers in America, 



DELLON BACK WITH HARMS CO. 

Harold Dellon is back at his post as 
professional manager of T. B. Harms & 
Francis, Day & Hunter, and in addition 
to the standard ballad publications of 
this house 1b introducing a new English 
number entitled "Sometime You'll Re- 
member." 



HARMS CO. ENTERTAINS 

The T. B. Harms Co. gave a theatre 
party on last Wednesday evening to the 
wives of the delegates to the Sheet Music 
Dealers' convention held in New York last 
week. The ladies witnessed a perform- 
ance of "Turn to the Right'" at the 
Gaiety theatre. 

KENDIS AND BROCKMAN COMBINE 

James Eendis and James Brockman 
have combined and formed the Kendis- 
Brockman Music Co., Inc., E. H. Baker, 
formerly buyer for the J. G. McCrory re- 
tail syndicate is a member of the new cor- 
poration. 



GOLDBERG'S SILLYSONNETS 

Rube Goldberg, the cartoonist, has had 
his famous cartoons set to music, and 
under the title of "Sillysonnets" have 
been published in sheet music form by the 
Feist bouse. 



FLAMMER INCORPORATES 

Harold Flammer, music publisher, has 
incorporated for $5,000. The directors of 
the new company are Harold Flammer, 
George Vail and A. L. Wright, all of New 
York. 



"I write anything- from a production to 
a parody to order only" lilts Marvin Lee, 
the Western Wonder. "All special exclu- 
sive material fully guaranteed." So there 
you are, all you pining artists and man- 
agers. Line forms to the right 

Army officials are getting up an Official 
Song Book for the boys to use in camp and 
abroad. "Sweet Adeline" has been picked 
as one of the numbers, and the old songs 
seem to have the preference. So away go 
the fond hopes of many of the patriotic 
song writers. 

A new song genius is appearing on the 
horizon. Dave Lee, and his new song, 
. "Golden Prairie," written in conjunction 
with Lambie Wolfie Gilbert, is a gem. 
Dave's other numbers are equally good, and 
his speed, combined with his ambition, 
would "be useful to some publisher. 

"Foolishment," by Bide Dudley, in the 
Evening World. , 

Oh, a wonderful. singer was Mamie McGee, 
She never was known to get off of the bey, 
She never was known to get off of— aw, 

gwanj :,• 
How could she get off what she never got 

on? 

The new (?) Broadway touch. By a 
musical director, who happens to be a little 
down, and only partly out Enough to 
make bim lose his sense of rhythm. After 
listening to his hard luck tale, and figuring 
whether a quarter, half, or a whole dollar 
would help him the most, we decided to fall 
for the dollar. Handing it to him, expect- 
ing gobs of joy and thanks, he said, "Can't 
you make it two"? 

The little buttons, which read "Get Be- 
hind the Government The Liberty Loan 
of 1917," and which you get when you boy 
a Liberty Bond, are going to do a lot 
towards getting the rank and file interested. 
Any buyer of a bond wears his with de- 
light especially if he's in a place where no 
one has bought any. Try it and you'll 
have a feeling of pride, as well as know 
you have done your little bit 

Some more "disposition ruiners," by 
Georgeous Botsford: 

No. 1 — The grand opera singer (?) try- 
ing to learn a popular song. 

No. 2. — The vocalist who knows the song 
backwards but makes yon play it every day 
"just to try his *oice." 

No. 3. — A double team, usually man and 
wife, who get into a red-hot argument 
while learning a song, and proceed to drag 
the family skeleton before your admiring 
gaze. 

No. 4 — The performer who says, "Whsfi 
that swiped from;' 

No. 5. — The wise one who says "if I too 
high" just as you hit one note in the vamp. 

"Doggone it all, you fellows have put an 
awful dent in my income by cutting out 
that dough I used to get for singing songs," 
said the monologist who packed his act 
with pay-as-you-enter ditties. 

"But, listen, my boy," replied the poor 
publisher. "The phonograph companies 
pay us for the use of our numbers, the 
piano-roll men do too; the moving picture 
theatres and cabarets pay our society for 
the same thing. Now we have nice rooms. 
good pianists, suave greetera, fine songs, 
plenty of copies, and besides, mind yon, 
furnish you absolutely free, the orchestra- 
tion, so you will be put to as little trouble 
as possible in becoming a big hit wherever 
you work. So you see, you're in pretty 
soft" 

"Gee, whir!" exclaimed the staggered 
artist -"You're right I am lucky." 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




PICK ROSTERS 

FOR NINE 

SHOWS 

MANY PRINCIPALS RE-ENGAGED 

' The producers on the Colombia and 
American Burlesque Circuits are complet- 
' ing the rosters of their shows for next sea- 
son. 
j During the past week, five shows were 
i cast. All will commence rehearsals within 
the next three or four weeks, at the con- 
clusion of which they will play preliminary 
engagements, before starting the regular 
- season. 

For.' his "Broadway Frolics," Jack 
Singer.' has engaged Lon Haskell as princi- 
i pal comedian. The other principals in the 
' company will be, Wilbur Dobbs, Sam 
Hyams, Jim Tenbrooke, Jean Irwin, Bes- 
sie Baker, 'Vera Ransdale, arid Mabel Del 
, : mont.- -Moe. v Messiog is to be company 
manager,.' Jimmy Frank business manager 
and. 'Louis Baer musical director. 

The. < complement of Singer's "Behman 
Show,"; will have Harry Lang, Vie Cas- 
. more, Gecfrge Douglas, Bobby Vail, Freda 
Flbranes, Lucille Mannion, Ameta Pynes 
and 'Marie 'Mann in the principal roles. 
Singer will manage this company and Walt 
Stanley will be the musical director. 
.'The Singer, Talbot show, "The Lid Lif- 
ter's,!' on the American Circuit, will have 
as its principals, Dolly Sweet, Johnnie 
Weber, Clayton Frje, Dolly Meden, Rus- 
: sell HilU Ed. Jerome, and the Constance 
Sisters.- Lew Talbot is to manage this at- 
: traction, with' Harry. Leavitt in advance 
and Otto Muhlbaner 'wielding the baton. 

F.'.W. GerhardYs, '^Mischief Makers," 
, on the, American, Circuit will have, among 
its principals,' Joe Wilton, Joe Freed, 
Charles Van Oaten, Jack Crosby, Stella 
Morrisey, Mabel Clark,. Ethel Lee and 
Trixie'.Van. Mr. • Gerhardy will manage 
the show himself. 

Morris Wainstock's, "Military Maids," 
will consist of George A- Clark, Charles 
Fagan, Leona Fox, Franks & Hilbert 
Harry Van, Nellie Greenwood, Caroline 
Warner and Ben Holmes, in the principal 
'. parts and a chorus of 'sixteen girls. Irving 
Becker will manage the' company, with 
Harry Finberg doing the advance .work 
and Fred Brooks doing the musical direct- 
ing. The working crew will comprise Fred 
Hilbert, Harry Courtlahd and A. Gutner. 

James "Blutch" Cooper's, "Army ft 
Navy Girls," Will have, among its princi- 
pals, • Bert Weston, Jim. Pearl, Solly 
Woods, Ed. Morton, Frank Manning, Elsie 
Mayo, Fritel Moore, Evelyn Ferris and 
MJle; Florette.- The chorns will contain 
eighteen girls. Lou Stark will be com- 
pany manager, B. ,C • Andrews, business 
manager, George Hawley, carpenter, Chas. 
Collins, electrician. Jack Q'Oonnell, prop- 
erty man and Lee Hawley Ward, wardrobe 
mistress. 

The cast of Al "Beeves \Big show will 
comprise, Al Reeves, Dave Lewis, Johnnie 
Dove, Edw. Vogt Jean Leighton, Wood 
Sisters, O. W. Braddock and Mary Os- 
born. The chorus will have twenty girls. 
Reeves will manage the show and Baily 
Allard will be the musical director. 

The completement of Hasting's Big Show 
will include, Dan Coleman, Phil Peters, 
The Runaway Four,. James Haraard, 
Frank Mallahan, Hazel Lorraine and a 
chorus of twenty damsels. Larry Nelms 
will manage the show and Chas. Edwards 
will travel in advance. 

Those to appear in the Mollie Williams 
show are, Mollie Williams, Ambark Ali, 
May Sheridan, Jack CMalley, Billy Mcln- 
tyre, Bob & Nellie Gilbert, Florence Kelly 
and twenty girls. 



DANIELS GOES TO ST. LOUIS 

St. Louis, June 16.— Chas. Daniels has 
been appointed manager of the Gayety 
Theatre, St. Louis. Daniels, should be a 
great success in St. Louis and bring the 
business up to the. high standard that 
house enjoyed previous to the time the 
Columbia Amusement Co. gave, it up four 
years ago for ■ the Princess Theatre. 

Daniels started in show business in St. 
Louis and is well known here. He has 
been in. burlesque many years, having man- 
aged the Casino in Brooklyn, for seven 
seasons and was manager of road shows 
previous to that. 



BURLESQUE FOLK AT SPRINGS 
West Baden, Inn., June 16. — Mr. and 
Mrs. E. Thos. Beatty, Ed. E. Daly and 
Lena Daly, owners of "The French Frol- 
ics" of the American Burlesque Circuit 
and John Kempton, manager of the Lin- 
den Theatre, Chicago, arrived here to-day 
on a motoring trip. After a visit of ten 
days, they will leave for Mt. Clemens. 
"The French Frolics" will start rehearsals 
about July 12. 

FINNEY TO HEAD "BOSTONIANS" 
Frank Finney will head the Waldron 
"Bostonians" show next season, assisted 
by Nettie Nelson, Phil Ott, Beatrice, 
James Hunter, Kathryn Dickie and Mack 
and Bernard. Frank Pierce will manage 
the tour; Wm. V. Waldron will be in ad- 
vance and George Glass will be musical 
director. 



BAKER SIGNS SMITH & LEE 

Jack Smith and Milt. Lee, who have 
been playing in vaudeville the last season, 
have signed with Charlie Baker for his 
"Speedway Girls" for the coming year. 
Smith is writing several numbers for the 
show, as well as for Baker's other com- 
pany, the "Tempters." 



ACTOR RAVES; SENT TO HOSPITAL 

Cincinnati, June 12. — William Roth- 
acker, said to be a Shakespearean actor, 
was found by a policeman in Garfield Park 
last night in a state of delirium reciting 
the balcony scene from "Romeo and 
Juliet" He was taken to the General 
Hospital for observation. 



FLAIG & BEALL SIGNED 
T»tttt j sniaa , June 15. — Flaig and 
Beall with the Summer stock at the Gayety 
will close with that company July 2 and 
rest up before going. to Chicago to join the 
"September Morning Glories." 

MEYERS CLOSES CASINO 

Simon Meyers, late of the team of Ails 
and Meyers, closed at the Casino, Brook- 
lyn, last Saturday night, and left the fol- 
lowing day for his home at Tuskaloosa, 
Ala., for a short rest. 

WEBER HAS BIG STOCK CAST 

The Joe Weber Stock Co., at Platta- 
burg, N. Y., includes Harry Seymour, Bob 
Nugent, Sam Ray nor, Adrian Perrin, 
Louise Pearson, Rose Allen, Ruth Bar- 
bour and Wally Brooks. 

CAMPBELL SIGNS GORDON 

William S. Campbell has signed Bob 
Gordon to manage his "Rose SydeU Lon- 
don Belles" company for next season. 
Dave Gueran will be in advance. 



BELFRAGE MAY CHANGE TITLE 

George Belfrage will probably bestow 
the title of "Biff-Bang-Bsng" on the new 
show he is organizing 'for the American 
Circuit. 



OPENING DATE SET 
"Hello, America, the new H. ft S. show, 
featuring Lewis end Dody, will open the 
season at the Orpheum, Paterson, on Au- 
gust 11. 



BURLESQUE CLUB 

ELECTS NEW 

OFFICERS 

EXPECT TO HAVE CLUB HOUSE 



Henry C Jacobs, of Jacobs and Jermon, 
was elected president of the Burlesque 
Club last Thursday night, and imme- 
diately stated to the members that he 
expected' the club to have its own. club 
house before the next election. He 
stated that he is willing to let the club 
have any amount of money necessary for 
its welfare. He also paid a glowing 
tribute to Sam Lewis, the retiring presi- 
dent, who was the originator of the club 
and its first president. 

Besides Mr. Jacobs, the following offi- 
cers were elected: First vice-president, 
Jack Singer, who defeated Jean Bedini 
for the office; second vice-president, Joe 
Hurtig, who had Rube Bernstein and 
Jimmy Frank as opposition; third vice- 
president, Jean Bedini; recording and 
financial secretary, James Powers; treas- 
urer, Sammy Kraus, and sergeant-at- 
arms, Julius Greenbaum. 

Sam Lewis was elected Chairman of the 
Board of Governors over Lew Talbot. 
The other members of the board elected 
were Henry Dixon, Lew Talbot, Wash. 
Martin, Ira Miller, Chas. Falk, Phil. Dal- 
ton, Nat Golden, Arthur Pearaen, Max 
Spiegel and William Vail. 

Upon retiring from office. President 
Lewis told of the start of the club a 
year ago and of its growth to a member- 
ship of 300. He stated that, after fitting 
up the club rooms, there was over $2,000 
in the treasury and he felt sure that 
more than double that amount would be 
there next year. The members of the 
club presented Lewis with a water color 
likeness of himself which was hung in 
the club rooms. 

John G. Jermon, Joe Hurtig and Max 
Spiegel also spoke. 

It was voted to arrange for a burlesque 
benefit toward the end of next season at 
which all of the burlesque stars will ap- 
pear. It will probably be held at the 
Columbia Theatre on a Sunday evening. 

AILS & LEWIS JOIN 

Roscoe Ails, wLo closed with the Mollie 
Williams Show in Brooklyn, last week, 
has joined partnership with Charlie Lewis, 
late of the "Black and White Revue." 
They will offer- an act in vaudeville, open- 
ing in Philadelphia, this week. Ails will 
be featured with Fred Irwin's "Majesties;" 
next season. 



CURTIN IMPROVING EMPRESS 

Uncle Jim Curtin is installing a new 
ventilating system at the Empire, Brook- 
lyn, as well as redecorating the house. All 
the improvements will be completed in time 
for the opening of the house early in Au- 
gust. 



WELLS SIGNS BENTLEY 

Harry Bentley, for the past four years 
with Pete Clark's shows, was signed last 
week by Billy K. Wells for his "Mile-a- 
Minute Girls" for next season. 



BOB SIMONS MARRIED 

Boston, June 16. — Bob Simons, the bur- 
lesque manager was married this week 
here to Miss Agnes Frawley, a former 
member of one of bis companies. 



HOWARD STOCK TO CLOSE 

Boston, Juno 18.— The Howard Stock 
Co., under the direction of Strauss and 
Franklin will close its season Saturday 
night 



COMBINE SHOW AND BOXING 

Minneapolis, Minn., June 17. — The 
Gayety Theatre here Is staging boxing 
matches in conjunction with its show. On 
Friday night, during the engagement of 
the "Jolly Grass Widows," a double box- 
ing event was staged, Charles McCarthy 
meeting Billy Whelan, and Billy Stein 
meeting Joe Bower. 



COOPER A. CARLTON IN VAUDE. 

Jimmy Cooper and Sam Carlton, late of 
the "Charming Widows," have forsaken 
burlesque for the coming season. They 
have obtained contracts to play the neigh- 
borhood circuit of -..udeville theatres. They 
made their debut at the Prospect Theatre, 
in The Bronx,' last Week. 



* . RIDER IN PORTLAND. 

Portland, Ore., June 18.— Dick Rider, 
last season manager of the "Sightseers" 
company, arrived here a few days ago. 
He is on a short business and pleasure 
visit- He will return to New York before 
rehearsal pf the burlesque shows. 



PALS. TO TRAVEL TOGETHER 

.Bob .Gordon and Jack Leslie will travel 
together next season ; Bob as manager with 
"Rose SydeU Show" and "ack ahead of the 
"Bon Tons." 



THERE'S ANOTHER SHEEHAN NOW 

Earl Sheehan. straight man. with the 
Olympic Stock .Co., announces the arrival 
of another heir at his home in New York, 
June 14. .• - o 



SYLVIA BRODY SIGNED 

Sylvia Brody has been signed by Harry 
Shapiro as soubrette of "the Ben Welch 
Show for next season. ' 



GRAND CHANGES POLICY 

The two-a-day. stock plan at the Grand, 
New York, has been* changed to continu- 
ous burlesque, vaudeville and pictures. 



BURLESQUE NOTES 



Doris Claire has been re-engaged for 
next season with Billy Watson. 

Martin J. Wigert will advance toe Ben 
Welch Show next season. 



Billie Davie will be a member of Dink- 
ins" "Innocent Maids" next season. 



Laura Worth has been re-engaged for 
the "liberty Girls." 

Fred De Selva will be with "The Avi- 
ators" next season. 



McGarry and Revere will be with the 
"Some Babies" Show next season. 

Harry Seymour will be with the "Caba- 
ret Girls" next season.. 

"The Record Breakers" are doing good 
business in stock at Mannion'a Park, St. 
Louis. 



Roscoe Aills will be with the Majesties 
next season, the team of Aills and Myers 
having split. 

Mrs. Tom. Sullivan has recovered from a 
severe attack of appendicitis which neces- 
sitated an operation. 



The Gaiety, Buffalo, will open the sea- 
son Aug. 4, under Manager Dick Patton, 
with the Harry Hastings Show. 

Taking the entire number of weeks 
played, Dave Marion is credited with toe 
biggest "take" for the season, with "Hip, 
Hip Hooray" second and "Some Show* 

third. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 



ANOTHER "LITTLE BIT OF BAD 



GO TO 
IT I 



This is the little song that copped tirst 
place in the Summer Song Race 




Your 
Copy 




Sung everywhere and a 

hit every time! Plenty ot catch lines! 



Orchestration in 
Your Key Ready ¥ 



BOSTON 

181 Tremont Street 

PHILADELPHIA 
Broad and Cherry Sts. 



LEO. FEIST, Inc. 

\ti?> W. 44tlv St. i NEW VORK 

CHICAGO, GRAND OPERA HOUSE BLDG. 



ST. LOUIS 
7th and Olive Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Pantages Theatre Bldg. 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



"CRUMBS" 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Comedy-dramatio sketoh. 
Time— Sixteen minutes. 
Setting — Full state special. 

"Crumbs" Is a rather pretty and ap- 
pealing type of sketch played by two 
women and a man. 

At the rise of tbe curtain, a negro 
"mammy" appears in tbe park with her 
lunch-basket and the birds begin chirp- 
ing for crumbs, it being her daily habit 
to feed them. However, this time, she 
doea not appear to be very much in tbe 
mood to do so. 

Just then a young girl comes in crying 
and explains to the "mammy" that she 
has had a spat with her husband. Food 
is given her and the girl goes to sleep 
on the bench. Shortly afterward, along 
comes the husband. He is recognized 
from the description given by the wife 
and tbe "mammy" starts talking to him, 
telling him that he is in trouble. The 
man admits it and she tells him that she 
will read his palm. 

She then recalls the various spats he 
has had with his wife and also tells him 
what the future has in store for him 
wben be appears repentant for his pre- 
vious demeanor toward his wife. He is 
also given something to eat and takes 
a nap alongside of the wife, who is cov- 
ered over with a robe. The "mammy" 
wakes tbe girl, after shifting her head 
onto the shoulder of her husband. The 
girl in torn awakens her husband and 
the couple patch up their differences. 

The role of the "mammy" is splendidly 
' acted and the one of the girl is fairly 
well done. But that of the man is han- 
dled in a very amateurish manner. 
Whether he was indifferent as to the 
manner in which he spoke his lines or 
lacked the ability to do better is a mat- 
ter of conjecture, and the turn was seen 
at the supper show. However, the act 
presented properly, should find sufficient 
employment in three-a-day houses. 

A. U. 



ARTHUR EDWARDS & CO 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

Before tbe rise of the curtain, Nor- 
man Burbank, a writer, and one of the 
characters in the playlet, introduces the 
other three members of the company to 
the audience in a rather clever speech. 
Tbe rest of the cast includes : Burbank's 
wife, bis darky servant, and a mysterious 
character who calls himself Inspiration. 
The name of the playlet is "Neglect." 
It was written by Ben Harnett. It 
deals with a writer who neglects his 
wife and child for his work and, 
strange to say, be has written a won- 
derful book upon the subject of Neglect. 
In a dream, Inspiration, his best friend, 
visits him and calls him to task for the 
way he has treated those who love him 
most dearly and he sees his child, now 
grown to womanhood, in the shadow of 
prison because she has been neglected. 

Awakening from his dream, he decides 
to make amends, and all ends happily. 
.The playlet is well acted,, but dreams 
and visits from allegorical characters 
have been done so many, many times 
that such plots have lost their novelty, 
and it bas now come to pass that the 
audience guesses the conclusion long be- 
fore the author reaches it, H. G. 



JEANNE 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

(Continued from page 9) 



CECILE & FRANCOIS 

Theatre— Proctor's SSth 8t. 

Style— Novelty acrobatic dancing. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — Full stage special and one. 

This is a turn that will develop into 
a favorite in the neighborhood theatres, 
especially for the closing spot, on ac- 
count of its novelty. The opening is in 
one, with the man attempting to sing 
and dance. He finishes his song and 
then he and the woman do various 
styles of dances. The curtain then 
arises to full stage and the couple 
present an acrobatic waltz, with hand- 
springs and cartwheels interpolated. 

While the woman is making her 
change, the man does a number of dif- 
ficult feats on a thirty-inch wooden hall. 
The act concludes with a Tel 7 neatly 
presented dance entitled, "The Dance of 
the Spider and the Fly." This number 
is well presented and adds considerably 
to the prestige of the turn. A. U. 

SAMHEARN 

Theatre — Proctor's 23rd Street. 

Style — Impersonations. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Sam Hearn, In a rube characterisa- 
tion, enters and makes the announce- 
ment that an opera house entertainment 
is about to start. He apologizes for Ion 
Hearn, who bas not arrived in time to 
appear and says that he will take Lou's 
place. He then sings Lou Hearn's Span- 
ish onion song, after which he announces 
that the show will begin. 

On an easel at one side of tbe stage 
are tbe program cards. Sam Bernard, 
Willie Howard and Kubelik appear in 
the order named. The impersonations 
of Bernard and Howard are extremely 
well done. 

The impersonation of Kubelik re- 
quires a greater stretch of the imagina- 
tion, but, even if Hearn's playing is 
nothing like Kubelik's, he proves him- 
self to be a capable violinist and renders 
several well played selections. In the 
last selection, he plays a first and sec- 
ond violin part at the same time. 

Hearn bas an unusual act. In mak- 
ing his impersonations, he has deviated 
from the course that others pursue and 
has chosen wisely. He has a tarn that 
any audience is bound to enjoy. 

H. O. 



Theatre— Proctor's 58f* Street. 
Style — Singing. 
Tune — Eleven minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

Jeanne is a pretty, little blond In- 
genue and first appears as a swagger 
young chap in full dress, singing a Dixie 
number, that is followed by a dance. 

Then comes a number of- other songs 
in which the boy's costume has been dis- 
carded for more attractive feminine at- 
tire. The songs are well song and each 
is specially costumed. Jeanne has some 
very quaint little mannerisms which "help 
the success of her turn. H. G. 



"LITTLE MISS UP TO DATE" 

Theatre — Rialto, Chicago. 
Style — Girl act. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 
Setting— One, too and three. 

The producing stamp of Menlo Moore 
is on bis latest offering to vaudeville, 
"Little Miss Up To Date." In all there 
is to see, the texture of the material is 
first class. In fact, it overshinea the 
rest of the turn. 

Fay O'Neill and Leon Leonard are 
featured in the leading roles, while an- 
other principal girl plays selections on 
a piano-accordion and a saxophone 
during changes of scenes and costumes. 

Six girls make np the background and 
disport several showy costumes, the ones 
for "Black Eyed Susan" being 
especially attractive- Scenes shift from 
"two" to "one" twice, with the finale 
before a flashy set in "three," represent- 
ing a roof garden, with tbe main prin- 
cipal couple leading and dancing to a 

number i<efittiog the title of the act. 
Miss O'Neill Is a comely miss and 
shows a couple of pretty dresses. What 
dancing is called for she executes grace- 
fully. Leonard was severely handicapped 
with a lost voice, and waa barely able 
to speak his words. All in all, it is a 
big, flashily dressed type of girl act that 
will salt any audience. Too. 



HAZEL HASLAM & CO. 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd Street. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting— Parlor set. 

The plot of this playlet centers around 
the fact that Mrs. Elliott carries on her 
business and club activities under her 
maiden name of Helen Potter. This in- 
furiates her husband who, in order to 
care her, conspires with a friend to make 
love to his wife, the friend to pretend 
be does not know she is married. The 
scheme succeeds. 

Miss Haslam acquits herself capably. 
The husband gives satisfactory support. 
The friend is inclined to overdo his role. 
The playlet is only mildly amusing. 

H. G. 



GOETTLER AND COX 

Theatre— City. 

Style — Piano and songs. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. House drop. 

Archie Goettler, who has written the 
music to popular songs, and Eddie Cox, 
who has written lyrics, have formed a 
combination and are presenting their 
past and present song successes. 

Goettler is at the piano, and also 
helps along the singing. The boys put 
over their own wares in good song plug- 
ger style. The idea of keeping Goettler's 
patriotic song for the last was a happy 
one, not that they needed a patriotic 
number to help them go over, but it made 
an excellent finale. S. W. 



"MILADY'S GOWN" 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd St. 
Style — novelty draping. 
Time— Fifteen mii»ule». 
Setting— b\u stage. Special. 

This act, presented by two men and 
two women, is constructed along simi- 
lar lines to "Fashions a la Carte." The 
only difference is that there is dialogue 
in this turn. The draping of gowns is 
along the lines of the other turn also, 
with one woman singing while the male 
modiste is draping the form of the 
other. The use of a bridal gown at 
the finish is the same as that of the 
other act, too. 

The comedian does a novel stunt in 
his burlesque of the work of the other 
draper. The act is neatly assembled 
and no time is wasted in the routine. 
It was evidently designed for the three- 
a-day houses and if kept away from 
the circuits that the larger act has 
already played, will be quite a drawing 
card. A. TJ. 



"GIRL FROM STARLAND" 

Theatre — Boulevard. 
Style — Song and dance revue. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

"The Girl from Starland" is a spec- 
tacular song and dance revue de luxe, 
and utilizes two girls. 

When the curtain goes up, a girl is 
found sitting on a bench singing. At 
the conclusion of her song, she drops 
asleep. The stage darkens and another 
girl enters from a gauzy gate and dances, 
inking the girl on the bench supposedly 
to dreamland. 

Then follows a< routine of songs and 
lances by the two girls, with pretty cos- 
tume changes. One of the girls makes 
her entrance sitting, singing in a star, 
which swings over tbe stage and heads 
of the audience. This is a very effective 
number. 

"Tbe Girt from Starland" is a pleas- 
ing offering for the small time houses. 

8. W. 



NOLAN AND WILD 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd St. 

Style — Comedy talk and singing. 

Time— Twelve minute*. 

Setting— In one. 

Nolan A Wild are two men who 
offer a very entertaining comedy skit, 
which, when properly shaped and a few 
of the suggestive "gags" deleted, will 
make an appropriate turn for an early 
spot In the three-a-day houses. 

Their song routine la well rendered, 
both of them having acceptable voices. 
Their chatter, which is based on the 
motion picture business, is a bit sug- 
gestive in spots, the comedian making 
a few broad remarks here and there. 
Tbe picture scene "gags" are a novelty 
and are original with this couple. The 
concluding number, where the comedian 
appears in a school-day costume and 
sings a popular duet with his partner, 
in a falsetto voice, . carries the act over 
in a very creditable manner. 

A. TJ. 



REVUE DE VOGUE 

Theatre — City. 
Style — Bongs and dances. 
Time — Twenty-five minutes. 
Setting— Bpecia J. 

The Revue de Vogue is a spectacular 
song and dance offering in four scenes. 
.It opens in two, before a special drop, 
with a lavender and white color scheme 
carried out even to the girls' costumes. 
There are seven girls and one man in the 
act 

One of the girls plays the violin, ac- 
companied by another at the piano, while 
the man sings. This is followed with a 
song by another of tbe girls, assisted by 
the remaining four, who portray the sea- 
sons. There is a routine consisting of 
a piano solo, and a song by the man. 
Another drop is lowered and one of tbe 
girls then renders a violin solo. The 
man and three girls render a song, and 
then follows a dance and a medley of 
Bongs by two of tbe girls- 
There is also a scene outside a church, 
with the man asking four girls to marry 
him, and then a change to the inside of 
tbe church, where the wedding ceremony 
is witnessed. This is rendered in rag- 
time and made a big finale. 

The girl who renders tbe medley of 
Broadway songs has a sruod voice, and 
the one who gave one dance is also pleas- 
ing. The act on the whole, however, is 
mediocre. The ragtime wedding is not 
new, although the way it is staged gives 
the act a fairly big sendoff. S. W. 



FOUR CHINESE 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Musical. 

Time — Twelve minute*. 

Setting— Special. ' 

The atmosphere of this act is de- 
lightfully oriental. The hangings, fix- 
tures and entire set are In harmonious, 
sombre oriental shadings, and the 
quartette have gone so far toward 
atmosphere that even Chinese punk is 
burned. 

The quartette, two men and two 
women— dressed in attractive Chinese 
costumes, -play a number of musical 
selections, starting the act off with a 
brass number. This is followed by a 
violin solo. There is then a quartette 
of saxophones, followed by a couple of 
marimba numbers. 

The quartette is good act of its style. 

H. G. 



DUNN SISTERS 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd Street. 
Style— Sister act. 
Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

One of the sisters is thin to an Nth 
degree, and the first song the two girls 
sing chiefly concerns her. 

The other girl sings a novelty number, 
after which her sister re-appears in a 
dress which is not so inclined to exag- 
gerate her figure as her first attire. She 
sings a song about, the vaudeville stars 
of to-day and yesterday which is very 
original. The two girls then render a 
popular number and dance wildly about 
the stage, bnmping into the drop and 
sides of the proscenium arch occasion- 
ally, and being, apparently, unable to 
stop themselves in time to avoid collision. 
They should either tame down this dance 
or eliminate it, as it adds very little, if 
anything to the act. 

As a whole, the offering is very ac- 
ceptable. H. G. 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 



JOHNNY 



MATT1E 



MACKand 



N.V.A. 



Milk and Melody 

Direction IRVING SHANNON 



In Vaudeville 



HERBERT 



LEW 



PIANO AND SONG COMEDY 

BOOKED SOLID 



MAY AND BILLY EARLE 

Present 
"LOVE ME, LOVE MY DOG*' IV Otto T. Johnson, Assisted by tk. Dog 



RUTH and BOD 

THE CHRISTIES 

The Musical Act With a Punch 

JACK FLYNN. REPRESENTATIVE 




NAMLOH and NEB 

la a Scenic Production 

"A WYVERNS DEN" 

Loew Time Direction Sam Baerwitx 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

M ME DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Direction STOKER * B1ERBAUER 



HARRY PEASE 

u tl . QuMUan-Whr Is he always working? Question— Who is his nprueotatlvs? 
H.f. A. Answer-Becaus. he's sot THE material. Answer- NAT SOBEL 



"The American 
Entertainer" 



BILLIE ARGYLE JOE FENN 

THE ALL AMERICAN FOUR 

, HARMONY SINGING 

HARRY FENN H. P. FORSYTHE 



WILLIE 



JIMMIE 

MARSHALL <& COVAN 

ThcDanClng IVIaSterS Direct from the West 

NOW PLAYING THE LOEW TIME 

HARRY SHEA. Eastern Director WED NESTOR.. Western Director 



JACK 



NELLIE 



ORBEN and DIXIE 

fin Southern Songs and Dances 

Playine. Loew Circuit Andre— Care Cupper 



PHY i I P EUGENE 

CURWOOD and GORMAN 

Before the Honeymoon and After 



i By HERMAN KAHN 

Copyrishtsd 




Direction HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 
U. & O.— BIG TIME 



EDNA WINSTON TRIO 

NOW PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 



DIRECTION CHARLES BORNHAUPT 

1 



GALLARINI & SON 

Featuring the Boy Accordionist and Instrumentalist 

Now Being Featured on the U. B. O. Time 
DIRECTION— ALF T. WILTON 



THE NOVELTY FOUR 

Slim, Elmer, Cy and Heinie send a Hello to their friends. 

DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



PHYLE and PHYLE 

la Their Latest Comedy Su cc ess 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



FRANCIS 



FRANK 



WOOD and WARNOCK 

Novelty Act— In Vaudeville 



li 



Oro^n 



The Kentucky Girl 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



FRANCES CORNELL 

"A FASHIONPLATE IN SONGLAND" 

Exclusive Material In Vaudeville 



BILLY 



DICK 



WILSON and STEWART 



2 Boys and a Piano 

N. v. a . 



ORIGINAL 



COLONIAL TRIO 



MAUD KELLY 

Harpist 



Feamrine; 

MARTIN KEARY 

Tenor 
DIRECTION JACK SHEA 



KATHRTN HULLING 



GERTRUDE 



HARRY 



MILLIIMGTOIM & PAULI 

In Their Own Original Idea— "LOVE AND WAR" 

Grace Manning 

HI-LO-SONGBIRD OF VAUDEVILLE 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



<Conthuiad rrecn Page t) 



DE KALB, BROOKLYN 

(Lut Half) 

Following a Hearst PathC News Pic- 
torial, the vaudeville b&l was opened by 
Stewart and Olive, a pair of clever step- 
pers. The Pierette dance of the girl stands 
oat as the feature of the act The turn 
started the show off nicely. 

Marion and Willard follow the hack- 
neyed idea of having one of the team in 
the audience at the start of the act. She, 
of course, interrupts the girl upon the stage, 
whereupon a short argument ensues, cul- 
minating in her joining her partner upon 
the stage to "show what she can do." The 
act is only fair, and the girl who sings a 
patriotic number seems hardly capable of 
properly putting over a popular song. 

Frazer, Bunce and Harding, three men 
who harmonize in a way that pleased the 
audience, show considerable originality in 
their work. Their opening number is novel 
and everything they do goes over with a 
bang. They sing their "nationality" song 
entirely too fast. If they would take this 
number more slowly, with the purpose of 
pounding the words across, they would find 

the success of .the number doubled. 

"Congressman Kitty" is a playlet with a 
plot that will not stand very close analysis. 
It la entertaining if one does not go too 
far into the whys and. wherefores. - How 
a wise politician, who is supposed to know 
all his ps and qs, could blunder into mis- 
taking Kitty, a mere slip of a girl, for 
Congressman Flake, is not easily recon- 
cilable. There are other pieces, of business 
which could not stand, the test of close ex- 
amination, but, despite rather glaring 
faults and inconsistencies, the playlet 
seems to be a winner. Kitty and the poli- 
tician give excellent performances, 'While the 
acting of Congressman Flake passes 
muster. | 

George . Primrose and his Dancing Trio 
will be reviewed under New Acts. 

Fred L* Rhine and Company close the 
show ijvitlS a number of electrical experi- 
ments. ' For-'' their success, they resort 
mostly to comedy, depending upon a num- 
ber of -plants In the audience to furnish 
the amusement The audience applauded 
the act generously. .' H. Q. 



EIGHTY-HRST STREET 

(Last Half) 

The rain had little effect upon the busi- 
ness of this house on Thursday afternoon 
and, by the time Stuart Darow made his 
appearance, the theatre was well filled. 
The audience seemed to be thankful for an 
opportunity to get out of the rain and 
showed its appreciation by spontaneous 
applause for all turns. 

Darow, the sand, smoke and shadow- 
graph artist amused the house considerably 
with his offering. His last piece of busi- 
ness was rather slowly taken up by the 
audience, but when it did get the gist of the 
turn, it appreciated the work.' 

Jean Moore, in . "Song Sketches," was 
in the second position!' Will Oakland & 
Co., in "Danny O'Gill, TJ. S. A." was In 
the next spot. This offering of Oakland's 
hardly made the impression with the house 
that his previous one 'did. It appears to be 
overdrawn. Oakland has ability and it can 
not be seen why be does not procure a 
more substantial offering. 

Al Lydell & Bob Higgins, in their rural 
comedy skit, "A Friend of Father's," are 
not in the habit of following feature pic- 
tures. But they did not seem to mind this 
on Thursday afternoon, as they took the 
audience by storm. 

Ralph Dunbar's Tennessee. Ten, in their 
presentation of "Plantation Days," had the 
way paved for them by the previous offer- 
ing and easily captured the good wishes of 
the house with their work. The Jazz Band 
is a favorite with the people in this section. 

A. D. 



PROCf OR'S 58th STREET 

(Last Half) ;.. 

The Three Flora Brothers, in clown 
makeup, do some excellent work on hori- 
zontal bars.' They give a fast performance 
and start off the show with a lot of speed. 
Their clowning is funny' and gets a good 
quota of laughs. 

The Walsh Sisters show considerable im- 
provement since last reviewed in these 
columns. They have cut down the running 
time of their act to advantage. They have 
also made their repertoire more varied, but. 
do not seetn to get into the spirit of their 
last number. It is not sung with enough 
snap. The girls are entirely too self con- 
scious. When this song is built up, they 
will have a dandy act. The "Trentini" 
number was particularly well sung. 

Baker, Lynn and Company will be re- 
viewed under New Acts. 

Willie Weston seemed to find it more 
difficult to score at this theatre than at the 
bigger time houses. .His humor was too 
subtle, at times, for his audience and much 
of his talk seemed to go over the heads of 
his hearers on Thursday night His open- 
ing number, which is rather blue, hardly 
got a hand. His Italian song went over 
for a big hit Upon his exit be received 
big applause, due to the splendid way in 
which he put over the final patriotic num- 
ber. 

Santi, assisted by Virginia Ehrgott will 
be revelewed nnder New Acts, as will also 
Dobson and Richards, who followed. 

The Costa Troupe, consisting of three 
attractive maidens of the "Carmen" type 
and a man, closed the show, doing some 
very effective work on the rings, which the 
audience was qnick to appreciate. The 
Troupe brought the show to a snappy end 
and received a gratifying hand. H. G. 



AUDUBON 

(UstHsJf) 

A packed house witnessed the show 
here Friday night, and, following the 
Hearst-Pathe News Pictorial, the Cliff 
Bailey Duo opened the vaudeville show. 

Bailey is performing his old stunts and 
getting plenty of laughs through his 
gloves or kilts becoming entangled under 
the barrels and tables. As he does not 
overdo this, it furnishes amusement. His 
partner assists in some of the stunts and 
does somersaulting, mostly. 

Lyrica rendered several selections in a 
pleasing soprano voice. Her routine is 
varied and each number was shown due 
appreciation. 

Ott, Williamson and Nelson presented 

sketch which was a conglomeration of 
is such, was liked and 
There, is no consistent 
serves to provide laughs 
were many. A woman 
tries to cure her husband of drinking, and 
when he emerges drunk from a bar^she 
pretends to get drunk. 

The man who takes off the drunk fur- 
nishes most of the laughs. A rough-neck 
cowboy who enters then also provided 
comedy. •■ 

Winifred Gilrain and Girls, in a class- 
ical Terpsichorean offering, won meritori- 
ous applauBe. The girls are all graceful 
and dance well and could find a place on 
the big time. 

Hoey and Lee registered the hit of the 
bill. Everything they said was liked, 
and the audience disliked to see them 
go off. 

The Six Musical Nosses furnish music 
with their various instruments, scoring 
with each selection. They play trumpets, 
cornets and saxophones, and one number 
included two violinists and a cellist. 

S. W. 



nonsense and, 
went over big. 
plot, but It all 
of which there 



BROOKE GOES WEST 

J. Clifford Brooke left last Fridav for 
I/OB Angeles, Cat, to produce, for Oliver 
Morosco, "The Pursuit of Pamela," a com- 
edy by Chester Bailey Fernald, in which 
Eleanor Painter will bp seen in New York 
next October. 

BILLY HALL CLOSES SEASON 

Newport, R. I., June 16.— Billy Hall 
and his Musical Comedy Co. closed their 
season here recently at the Colonial The- 
atre. 



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for Houaekeeplne. Private Bath, Telephone, Electric Lights, 
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INSURE YOUR MATERIAL AGAINST THEFT 



REGISTER YOUR ACT 



SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 

THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached and a certificate will be returned to you aa 
an acknowledgment, and for future reference. The contribntion should be signed plainly dt the 
person or firm sending the same, and should be endorsed by the stsge manager of the show or 
of the house where the act ia being used or other witnesses. Further acknowledgment will be 
made by the names and numbers being published. 

Address your contributions to 

The Registry Bureau, 

NEW YORK CLIPPER, 1M4 Broadway, New York 



Data 

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Enclosed please find copy of my 

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» 

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Address 



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22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 



phiiip' A U STIN&BAILEY Leo 



IN "A SYNCOPATED HOTEL" 



DIRECTION FETE HACK 



MARY L.MAXFIELD 

Little Miss Personality 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



A HOLIDAY IN DIXIELAND 

to— PEOPLE- -lO 
WITH 

Will MASTEV and Virgle RICHARDS 

Im r Cyclanle Bant at Mirth, Malady and Dndu 



Dadv 
DfaVJCtfeaB 



HARRY A. SHEA 



BENTELL BROS. 

Acrobatic Dancers 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



PLAYING U. & O. 



STONE & LE SOIR 

PRESENTING 

12 ROYAL TROUBADOURS 

Singer* and Instrumentalist* 
' DbractkB-LEE MUCKENFU3S 



JOHNNY ! 



MARION 



JONES and GREENLEE 



"WHAT DID YOUlDOT" 



Direction H. But. McHuffk 



JIM 



BEATRICE 



MclNTYRE and WYNNE 

i 

Comedy, Talking, Singing, Dancing in One 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



4 Ft. 8 
of Ragtime 

In Win. a FriadUndWa Inc., "Tha S uffr a i a Ua Raraa. 
Under Faraenal Hoa|OHat BART. H. MeHUGH 



SAM 



GARLAND 



ZITA LYONS 

"Venus of the Show World" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



-WHITE 

In a Song or Two and a Dance or So 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Ada 



MAY 1 KAE 

LARINe and CRAWFORD 

In Piano, Violin and Songs 

VAUDEVILLE 



IMOGENE COMER 

txt iriimrtm t? t? 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



ZIEGLER SISTERS 



AND THEIR KENTUCKY FIVE 



Direction PAUL DURAND 



GAINES & HOWARD 

IN THE BOSS'S CLOTHES— £EEN 'EM YET? 
IN VAUDEVILLE 

HELENE'l VIN'CENT 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

LINTON and WATSON 

Conwdr TaUntf Act, En ti U»d 

««Sl-»e Auto Know** 

Johnnie KENNY and LaFRANCE ™ 

PREMIER DANCERS Diractioa TOM JONES 

t COLLINS & WEST—"- 

la » Cawidy Skit. "Tha Book Aiani" DJracriaa. WENONAH TENNEY 

KITTY FLYNN 



THE GIRL. FROM 
BRIGHTON 

ENCHANTRESS OF RAGTIME ALLEY. 



BOOKED SOLID 



ANNA MARIE 



DAINTY COMEDIENNE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



SKATING VENUSES 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



HARRY 



It- 

Upside Down Comedian* 



DIRECTION WENONAH U. TENNtTT 



FOUR MUSICAL KLEISES 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

HENRY LOWY & LACEY SI S TERS 

K ULEWia iCITIES IN SONGS AND DANCES 

ZELLA RAMBO 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

"earyXeary" 

WHIRLWIND NOVELTY GYMNASTS NEW TO THE EAST 

L Y L E & HARRIS 

The Diminutive Pair, Present "In the Hallway" 

A NOVELTY SKIT IN ONE 



AND 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction WM. HENNESSY 



TANEAN BROTHERS 



Week June 18, 

ORPHEUM 
Detroit, •. Nvficti. 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



CIJj»je» 





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Arirr. Joe. 
Bako*, ecu. 
Butcher. B. J. C 
Bertrud, rruk 
Bailor. Mr. 
Braate, J. C 
Bart. C D. 
Brra*, Ju. 

Bell. Willie 



Atlant a. Uacel 
njawSj Mania 

Cameron, Ku 

OaRBt, iCMB 

Doney. Handle 



GENTLEMEN 

Beecher, W. 8. Oajtao. Frank Ploiatrop, Neal J.U Van, Barn 

Burton, Nell Dell, Doe Socman. EoaeM Lester. T. 

Brooks, Bor M. Dtaon, Bobby F. Laneaiter, Jack 

Cocry. Lewis Dobs, Mr. Howard, Jack Larden, Hany 

Cbok. Ben Elwyn, Lome Hamilton. 0. Lent, Joe. 

Centra*. Fred B. Emerson. H. A_ Gordon MajntoJ a Hall 

Cullto, Frank linns, 0. J. Iictooo, MaUaraMcshaiK. Jack 
Clark, Don M. Eerie. Darld a Koater. Chat. AMannill. Geo. 0. 
Camp. Cbaa. A. Eatraoo. J. H. La Uarr, Hany Morten, B. L. 

LADIES 

Darby, Flo Haatlnra, MIldredLe Not May Moron. Marjorle 

Feller. Connie HllUard, Stella Lester. Lain Mitchell. Don 

Foneit, Miry Boanoo. Jam Marrtro, Edith Mortttl. lame, a. 

Gmno. May Irwio. Mrs. JaekMorreala. Mist Nielsen. Carta 

Golden, TaUaka Jenklni, Chic atalrcm. Babe Opel. Blanche 



Miller. EdcHe Prior. Ernie 

Marrtn. Jack Feel. BUI 

Moore, Tree O-Bellly. F. 

Matee. John J. Belkaraar. t. N. 

Moot, Wm. V. Short, L. 

On. F. Sboctell, Al 

Day, Mr. Seiton. Jack 

Payton, Corse Tor, Ben 

Paul. 0. M. Wert. Cbaa, W. 



Helen Busaell, Alma 
Forrest Bajmood. Babe 

Mae L. Sllrer, Ertlro 
Baseland, Jon- Bterllnf. Kitty 
phlne Tt>Mn. Sylria 



PEW, BAND LEADER, DIES 

Howard Pew, band leader and manager, 
died last week at the North Hudson Hos- 
pital, New Jersey, at the age of sixty 
fears. In 1892, with David Blakely, he 
organized Soosa's Band and managed it 
for several years. Later, he became man- 
ager of the famous Gilmore Band and held 
that position for seven years. His last 
engagement was as manager of the Amer- 
ican tour of Arthur Nikisch and the Lon- 
don Symphony Orchestra. 

CARROLL JOHNSON BURIED 

Elizabeth, N. J., June 18. — The re- 
mains of Carroll Johnson, the blackface 
comedian, were interred last Tuesday in 
the family plot at Evergreen Cemetery. 
Mr. Johnson died May 1 last, and since 
that time the remains have been in a re- 
ceiving vault. The Elks took part in the 
interment ceremonies. 



"TWIN BEDS" MADE $75,000 

A. S. Stem, who acquired the road 
rights to "Twin Beds," from Selwyn & 
Co., this season, is said to have earned 
$75,000 profits through the tour of two 
companies through the United States. He 
will again place two companies on the 
road next season, one of them to be headed 
by Louise Bolton. 



ETHEL CARTER GETS DIVORCE 

Cincinnati, June . 16. — Helen Dekrafft, 
known as Ethel Carter, a theatrical singer, 
has been granted a divorce from Stewart 
Ives Dekrafft, newspaper man and press 
agent. 



DEATHS 



j 



MRS. MARY SEDLEY SMITH, known on 
the stage as Mrs. Sol Smith, died last Fri- 
day at her home, 99 Claremont Avenue, 
aged eighty-seven years. Mrs. Smith came 
from a theatrical family, her father being: 
Wm. Henry Sedley Smith, well known to 
the stage. She was born In Boston and 
was married In her teens to WlUlam Henry- 
Brown. At the age of twenty she made 
her debut, under the name of Mrs. Sedley 
Brown, appearing In the opera. "The 
Daughter of the Regiment." In her career 
she played In the support of most of the 
stars and for a number of seasons prior to 
his retirement was with E. H. Sothern's 
company. Her last appearance was made 
In April of laat year, when she played the 
nurse in "Romeo and Juliet." She was 
twice married, her second husband having 
been Sol Smith, a well known actor. Mrs. 
Smith leaves four children, Sedley Brown, 
stage director; Edward Brown, connected 
with a motion picture concern; Alice Brown, 
secretary of the Professional Women's 
League, and Mrs. Elmer Smith Redding. 
Funeral services were held Sunday in the 
Church of the Transfiguration and Inter- 
ment was in Greenwood Cemetery. 

TONY STEPHANE, twenty-six years old. 
known professionally as Anthony Howard, 
died last week at his home. His last stage 
appearance was with Eddie Leonard's act. 

CLYDE CARMEN, sister of Mrs. Mack 
Henley, of Mack & McCree, and a member 
of their act until her Illness, died June 6 
at Detroit. Mich., after an Illness of ten 
months. The deceased was twenty-eight 
years of age. 

MRS. MARIE OTTO, star In light opera 
in the early days of the Gilbert & Sullivan 
and E. E. Rice production, died last week 
from heart disease. She was born In Ger- 
many sLxty-alx years ago and was educated 
abroad. 



GET ASHE PLAY FOR MANHATTAN 

"Chu Chin Chow,** Oscar Ashe's ori- 
ental spectacular production, and one of 
the big successes of the current season in 
London, was secured last Thursday for 
America by Elliott, Comstock & Gest for 
a Fall production at the Manhattan Opera 
House. The firm paid the record-breaking 
sum of $50,000 as advance royalties and 
the final arrangements were only made after 
months of negotiations by Morris Gest on 
behalf of his firm. Lyle Sweet, general 
stage director for Oscar Ashe, will come 
to New York to supervise the staging of 
the play and there is a possibility of bis 
bringing a number of English players 
with him. 



DIANTHA PATTISON MARRIED 

Diantha Pattison, who has been appear- 
ing in "Our Betters," was married last 
week to Roy C. Wilcox of Meriden, Conn., 
at her home in Colonia, N. J. The groom 
will shortly sail for France to join tbe 
American Ambulance Corps. The bride 
win return to the stage next season. 



THARP NOW A LIEUTENANT 

Norman Tharp, an English actor, and 
a member of tbe Lambs Club, who has 
been in a training camp in. England for 
many months, has been commissioned a 
lieutenant. He will leave shortly for 
France. 




Beatrice Allen for "Furs and Frills.' 
Arabella 



Harry Ashford 
Romance." 



for 



and 



Harry Ashford 
Romance." 



for "Arabella and 



Fay Marbe by Comstock and Gest for 
"Oh, Boy !" 

Magna Paxton, by Edgar MacGregor, 
for new farce. 



Eleanor Martin by A. H. Woods for 
"Potash and Perlmutter." 

Stewart Baird. by Charles Frobman, 
Inc., for "Rambler Rose." 

Dorothy Maynard, by Comstock & Gest, 
for "Oh, Boy !" Chicago company. 



Evelyn Vaughan, by Edgar MacGregor, 
for a new production next season. 



Frederic de Bel ville, by Martin Beck, 
to support Margaret Anglin in vaudeville. 

Robert Gleckler and John Meehan, by 
John Cort, for "Mother Carey's Chickens." 



John Westley, Jane Grey, Robert Em- 
mett Keane, Floren e Moore, John Arthur, 
Fraccine Larrimore, Caroline Lilja, 
Thomas Meade, Harry Lilford, Gwendo- 
lyn Valentine and J. A. Curtis, by A. H. 
Woods, for "The Private Suite." 



Jack Housh 
Kalhryn LaVelle 



WHEN THE WORM TURNS 



Waatarn Rapraaaatatfra WAYNE CHRISTY 
Eaatara RrpreeaBtathre PETE MACK 



Who's tha Pint N. V. A. Widow? MEI 



CHARLES 




and 



IRENE 



SHAW 

NOW IN VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION BILLY ATWELL 



MERCEDES 



ALVIN and 



ANDY 



WILLIAMS 

Sailing from Vancouver June 6th, 
Aboard the Niagara for 

Australia 
RICKARLVS CIRCUIT 



BOB FINLAY 

and DOROTHY 

Offering 

"ABitO'ThisandThat" 

N. V. A. 

DIRECTION PETE MACK 



Bal's Dreadn aught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 



38 Inch fl7.ee |M men 

S2 Bach 18J8J38 bach 2oM8 

J4 inch us a inch ZLM 

42 Inch tZlM 

WILLIAM B AL COMPANY 

145 W. 45th St., N.Y. 4 W. 22d St , N.Y. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mall Orders Filled Same Day R a t al » a d 

tS Depoeit Required 



«. f. KEITHS 

PALACE 

Broadway a «7tb St. 

Mat. Dallr at z p. M. 

28, 60 ana 75e. 

Itirj N If h t 

15- 5C-7S-|1-«1. SO. 



NORA BATES. BERNARD 
(IB4HVILLI, O EO. 
\VHrTE ft XltatA HAIQ. 
'iTHE BRIBE SHOP." 
£aatarlac A N D a e w 

•x'OKBES, B0B1N8, TRX 
rVATTDRaUDTB. other!. 



aT~ , sT~l53TP Weat *Sth 8t. Ptaooe Brjant to. 

■*a#"*»»"«»e» a 5,4, ,] g,jo. Mate. Wad. ft Sat. 

Ittt CROWDED K0STH 

UPSTAIRS -DOWN 

BT nXDZBXO AVD TAMXT BAROaT 



M0R0SC0 



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THEATRE. 43th St. Wect 
of Broadway. Bra. 8:30, 
Mate. Wed. ft Bat. 2:30. 

praetota tha Una-Mar eoaaatlea 



THE BRAT 

Br MAUDE 1-UX.T0V 
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WLBUHXIX BMith aad JOBM E» OOUBM 



GAIETY 



' Pr aai n t tba aaaaon't aneeeaa 

T11RNT0THERIGHT 

UHlf aUCTFDfliU THEATRE. W. 42d St. 

RLtt AMdlLnUAM I v 8 , ., s »i 5 M,t ' w ' d 
ZIEGFELD FOLLIES 

AFTER THE PERFORMANCE 

NEW ZIEGFIELD MIDNIGHT FROLIC 

Start. H.80. 



PETCMACK 

ArtLits' Repretentativc, 

Can handle a limited number of 
high class attractions 



Palace Theatre BIdg. 

Phone Bryaat 2718 



PEP COMEDIANS 

THEODORE BOXY 

PANKEY McCARVER 

THE DEVIL AND THE 
WHITEWASH MAN 

Sinxinar, Dancine; and Talking 



"The theatrical 
Route" 

Comfortable! steamers leave New 
York, Pier 32, N. R., foot Canal 
St. 6.00 P.M., West 132d St. 6.30 
P.M. daily, including Sunday; also 
Sunday morning at 9.30 for Al- 
bany, Troy and the North. 

Save money 
Travel in comfort 

HUDSON NAVIGATION COMPANY 



SLA YM AN AU 

<> Producer ot it 

ORIENTAL NOVELTIES 

7M itfa Are, Nav York 

Phone Bryant 8950 



CHICAGO 
MANUSCRIPT CO 

43 1 MO. CLAflK 



MANUSCRIPT PUV5 

.MUSICAl-COHEOir* 



ati& 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 





Our New Factory Building. Capacity, 1M dozen i 



AGENTS GET H 

ici€d~iN*BIC? MONEY QUICK 

Selftthe most complete line of 

Photo-Handled Knives for Sales Boards 

Knives are all made of best steel. Handles with the latest REAL ART, SEPTEM- 
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WE ASSIGN YOU TERRITORY AND PROTECT YOU IN IT 
GOLDEN RULE CUTLERY CO. 

d.y. 212 No. Sheldon Street DepL 83 Chicago, HI. 



America's Representative 
Dancers 

ADELAIDE 

and 

HUGHES 



LA 
BERGERE 

Art in Porcelain 
and Marble 

Direction 
FRANK DONNELLY 
NORMAN JEFFERIES 



NAN ■ 
HALPERIN 



Management 
E. F. Atbee 



GEORGE M. 
ROSENER 

The Representative 

Character Actor 

of American 

Vaudeville 



CHARLIE 
HOWARD 



Management 
Max Hart 



ELIZABETH 

M. 

MURRAY 



Dir. Alf. T. Wilton 



SOPHIE j 
TUCKEIt 

and her 5 Kings of 
Syncopation 

M'g't Max Hart 



SYLVESTER 



AND 



VANCE 

in a skit by Willard Mack 
DIR. PETE MACK 



ROBERT 

DOR& 

The Eminent Barytone 
Direction Paul Durand 



CHAS. McCARRON 

presents 

BETTY 
BOND 

In Five Flights of Musical 

Comedy. Captured By 

Arthur Klein. 



EDYTHE 
& EDDIE 
ADAIR 

in 

"At the Shoe Shop" 

Management 
STOKER & B1ERBAUER, 



WILLIAM 

H ALLEN 

and 
ETHEL 

HUNTER 

Direction— Pete Mack 



JIMMY 



HLLV 



PLUNKETT and ROMAINE 

2 BOSTON BEANS— CHIPS OF THE OLD BLOCK 

In Dainty E c cen tric Sonp, Dances and Smile* 

Direction, JACK MANDEL and DAVE ROSE 



MARGUERITE CALVERT 



THE DANCING VIOLINIST 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



CLAYTON CONRAD 



CRAYON CONCEPTIONS 



Direction CHAS. W1LSHIN 



GEORGIA CAMPBELL 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



rHEEIMIMIIMGS 

REFINED COMEDY NOVELTY OFFERING direction chas. fitzpatrick 

The Smiling Accordionist 

B O O K E D S O LID 



MARIA 



THREE LADIES 



ONE MAN 



NOVELTY AERIALISTS 



Direction MR. BORNHAUPT 



In Vaudeville 



Direction Samuel Baerwitz 



WILLIAM WAHLE 

MANAGER, OLYMPIC THEATRE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



LaBELLE and WILLIAMS 



N. V. A. 



SINGING, DANCING, AERIAL NOVELTY 
Direction of Win. S. Henneasy 



Playing U. B. O. Time 



THE TWO STARS 

ROCKWELL 



AND 



WOOD]* 

LATE OF 

The Milky Way 

This Week 
New Brighton Theatre 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty St, 7 A. M. to U P. M. 

and at M ldnir b t with aiiapaw 

10 MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. M St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consalt P. W. HEROY. E. P.. A««t 
141 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



KLINE & WOOD 

SCENIC STUDIO 

408 GATES AVENUE, 
BROOKLYN. N. Y. 



MADISON'S BUDGET NO. 16 

contains only comedy material of toe highest 
standard and Is almost priceless to any active 
vandeTllle performer. Price one dollar. 

JAMES WADISOH, 1052 Third Arenas, New 
York. 



Electric "attraction'* Man, four rows, 12 letters 
each; foil supply of letters. MAJESTIC 
THEATRE. Jersey City. N. J. 



Agents 



Seeetaky H 
stO the 



Simplex Auto Brash 



new ante wagon washer, fits any hose. enre. Quick, 
cash sales: tree samples; write quick. FBAHCIS 
E. «CFO. CO., Harriabnrr, Pa. 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



CINCINNATI 

Work has been started in 'nsUlling an 
ice skating rink at the Woodland theatre, 
Zoological Gardens. 

George E. Nixon, film operator at the 
Grand Opera House, by quick -work pre- 
vented a serious fire last week when film 
exploded in bis booth. 

Kern Ajlward, singer and vaudeville 
actor, was called to his home in Covington, 
Ky., across the Ohio from Cincinnati, by 
the death of his father, John Aylward. 

Eddie Hackman is being missed around 
T. M. A. headquarters. He is critically ill 
at his home, being compelled to give u. bia 
work as stage carpenter at Chester Park 
soon after the season opened. 

B. T. Harvey, one of the veteran scene 
painters, will again be at the Grand Opera 
House when it opens its next season. 
Harvey has been the close friend of many 
of the leading actors of tbe old days. 

Charles Harris is back at Chester Park 
clubhouse, as cabaret-master. He spent tha 
winter handling cabarets for several im- 
poitant resorts. He is putting on a song 
revue 'that is making good. He has added 
Nell Woodruff to his singing forces. 

Secretary L. B. Wilson, of the Coving- 
ton Industrial Club, of Covington, Ky., 
journeyed to New York last week to be 
present at the opening of the Ziegfeld 
Follies. Hans Wilson, his brother, has a 
dancing number in the production. 

Augustus Legertts and his wife, playing 
at Coney Island, as Lea Legertts, are just 
starting an American tour after having their 
troubles il the European war zones. Their 
passports, about a yard long, show the 
difficulties under which they travelled. 

Following a meeting of the directors of 
the Walnut Street Theatre Co., reports 
that the house might be changed back from 
a movie theatre to a popular-priced dramatic 
bouse, were set at rest It is said the 
place is paying as a feature picture thea- 
tre. 



CAMPANINI ANNOUNCES ROSTER 

Director General Companini last week 
announced that be bad engaged the follow- 
ing singers for next season : Amelita Galli- 
Curci, Rosa Raisa, Louise Berat, Mar- 
guerite Buckler, Alma Peterson, Dora de 
Pbillipe, Virginia Shafer, Myrna Sharlow, 
Cyrena van Gordon, Lncien Muratore, 
Vittorio Arimondi, Giulio Criml, Octave 
Dua, Hector Dufranne, Desire Dufrere, 
James Goddard, Marcel Jonrnet, Alfred 
Maguenat, Juan Nadal Constantin Nicolay, 
Giacomo Rimini, Vittorio Trevisan, Marthe 
Chenal, Charles Fontaine, Genevieve Vix, 
Mme. Melba, Diana Bonnar, Jessie Chris- 
tian, Ruby Evans, Maude Fay, Anna 
Fitziu, Margery Maxwell, Marie Pruzan, 
Jeska Swartz, Forest Lament, VannI Mar- 
coax, and Carlo Galeffi. 



DALLAS TO HAVE NEW HOUSE 

Dauus, Tex., June 15. — J. A. Cressey, 
bead of the Cressey interests, and New 
York theatrical men, will build a $300,000 
modern theatre here. Work on the new 
house is expected to start within a month. 
It will be located fifty feet west of Ervny 
street and exttnd back to Pacific Avenue. 
It is said that the entire capital stock has 
been subscribed, and two New York men 
are now in Dallas, drawing np the plans. 



NEW THEATRE CO. INCORPORATES 

Tehee Haute, Ind., June 17. — The 
Terre Haute Theatres Co. was incorporat- 
ed last week for $200,000 for the purpose 
of building a theatre on the site at Eighth 
street and Wabasb avenue, where the Va- 
rieties Theatre once stood. Construction 
will begin on the new house about the last 
of the month. 



HARCOURT IS MADE CAPTAIN 

George Harcourt has passed his examina- 
tion for a captaincy in the United States 
Reserve Army and has been ordered from 
Madison Barracks to Syracuse. 



MANNERS GETS INJUNCTION 

J. Hartley Manners was last week 
granted a temporary restraining order in 
the copyright infringement suit which he 
has brought again* the Triangle Film Cor- 
poration and the Rialto Theatre. Mr. Man- 
ners brought the action as author of tbe 
play "Happiness" against the corporations 
as exhibitors of a photoplay called "Happi- 
ness," claiming it an infringement of his 
sole right to the title. 



CHANGE NAME OF PLAY 

Comstock, Gest & Elliott will this week 
place in rehearsal "The College Widow," 
a musical comedy which has been re- 
named "Leave it to James." The book and 
lyrics are by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wode- 
house with the music by Jerome Kern. It 
will be presented the latter part of next 
month at the Longacre Theatre. 



ACTRESS' BROTHER IS INVENTOR 
Trenton, N. J., June 18 — Harry E. 
Stahl, brother of Rose Stahl, the actress, 
and a Trenton machinist, has .n.tnted a 
submarine catcher which he will bring be- 
fore the Naval Consulting Board. The de- 
vice is designed to entangle the propellers 
of submarines and render them helpless. 



CHATTANOOGA THEATRE LEASED 

Chattanooga, Tenn., June 15. — The 
Signal Amusement Co., of this city, has 
acquired the lease on the Gay Theatre, 
the largest motion pictare house in this 
city. The place will be remodelled and 
renamed The Strand, opening during the 
latter part of next month. 

COBURN TALKS ON "THE STAGE" 

Burlington, Iowa, June 12. — Charles 
Coburn, of the Coburn Players, delivered 
an address on "The Stage" before tbe 
Literary Club here yesterday afternoon. 
The company presented "The Yellow 
Jacket" last night at the Grand. 



FLINT HOUSE CHANGES POLICY 
Flint, Mich., June 18.— The Majestic 
Theatre, which for the past two years 
has been playing vaudeville, to the ex- 
clusion of road attractions, will next sea- 
son play one-night stand road shows again. 



DANCING BUGS JOIN MINSTRELS 

Rome, N. Y.. June 18. — Harry Oakley 
and Gene Howard, formerly the Dancing 
Bugs, have signed up with Klien Bros, 
and Hengler's Greater Mastodon Min- 
strels. Season opening here July 30. 



RUSH ENGAGES MANNHEIMER 

Sol Mannheimer has been engaged by Ed- 
ward F. Rush to act in an executive 
capacity in conjunction with the two new 
theatres he is building in West Forty- 
eighth street. 



MITTENTHAL GETS "CHEATERS" 

Aubrey Mittenthal has obtained the one 
night stand rights for next season to 
"Cheating Cheaters?" from Al. H. Woods. 
The cast for the show is now being en- 
gaged. 



ORGANIZE THIRD "OH BOY" CO. 

A third "Oh Boy" company is beingor- 
gauized by F. Ray Comstock and Wm. 
Elliott to play Bostqn, where it will open 
July 30 at the Wilbur Theatre. 

FRANKO IS IN CINCINNATI 

CrNCrNJfATl, June 14. — Nahan Franko 
is the new conductor of the Cincinnati 
Summer Symphony Orchestra, now play- 
ing an engagement at the Zoo. 



BRADY HAS NEW PLAY 

William A. Brady and Louis Mann are 
to present Helen Ware in a new play by 
Samuel Shipman entitled "The Man Who 
Pays" next season. 

LUCY WESTON TAKING REST 

Shawnee on Delaware, Pa., Jnne 18 — 
Lucy Weston, the comedienne, is taking a 
rest here. She will return to New York 
next week. 



10 DAYS 



TRIAL 



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28 In., S13.S0; 28 In., $14.30: 32 In.. S13.50; 36 In.. $10. 50; 40 In.. $19. (X). Circus Trunks. 24x1Fxl8. 
$13.50. BUI Trunks. 30x25x13, Inside. $17.00. Lltho Trunks, 42Hx28VjXl2. .Inside, $20. Shipped on 
receipt of $5. balance C. O. L>.. except OTer 300 mites, tnen remit tbe whole aroSuDt. 
CENTRAL TRUNK FACTORY. Est. 1SS4. SIMONS ft CO.. 3. W. cor. 7tt> and .{.rcb Streets, Philadelphia. 

DR. JULIAN SIEGEL, the Theatrical} Dentist 

Suits) 2M PUTNAM BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY Phona Bryant UK 

EXCEPTIONAL RATES TO THE PROFESSION 



B l t »t.s»SS, t »S.l,S...MAU^«..S.S.^l^^ t ^^<. t .-»»VVV.' 



CHICAGO CABARET STARS 



^•»s.v.-.v.v.v.'.v.v.s.v.^^\i^^-A«»viWi.vv.^^trprfl 



JUAN IT A "gagy* 

HUGO ANGELO 

Chicago's Well Known Tenor Now at Cafe De Luxe, Chicago 

CORA COWAN 



Still at Cafe tie Luxe 



MAE McCREE 

TBE WIZARD MBS OF BAOTTME — 0T BIO TTKB. 
plrarUas— Sill fls— «■ 1021 Csass—rs alts.. Cskaas, 

DOROTHY OVERMIRE 

Stuffing High Clui Ballads la ' Flrat-daaa 
Loop Cabarat a— Chicago. 

ANITA GRAY 

Singing Ballads, Indefinitely at tfaa Tavern, 
Jac kson Park, Chicago. 

PHIL LORAINE 

FEMALE IMPERSONATOR, Faatura Dancar, 
Clubs and Function*. 



66 



99 



CLASSICAL DANCER. Far clubs and enter- 
tainments. (415 So. Halsted St_ Chicago. 



CHARLES JORDAN 

SIXTH MONTH 

State* Cafe Re-rue, Chicago 

MAUD MASSEY VAN BERGEN 

Ladr Director of Orchestra. Da Lux. Cafe, 
Chicago. 

LOOS BROTHERS syncopation 

S months at Marigold Follies, Bismarck Gar- 
dens, Now Singing at Jackson Park Tavern 
Beautiful, Chicago. 

LOUISE BEAUMONT 

("OLD LOLT") 

Rags and ballads 4 . Second S eason. 
FOREST PARK CHICAGO. 

TAKE THE CLIPPER 

Three months, $1.00 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



u • 



June 20, 1917 



BUD WALKER 

i The Versatile Boy 

Muuim take ^notice for next mil , Does evarytliina; but a Back Flip, 
j SEE JACK MeCANN 



ED. F. REYNAflD Pressats 
MLLK. 

BIANCA 

la a Sarin or Dramatic 
Dane* Pjaaau. 


MLLE. BIANCA Presents 

REYNARD 

The Vaatrfloqtdal Comedian, 
is "BEFORE THE COURT." 



The Nelson Trio 



HIGH-CLASS MtlSIOiL ACT 



&ANJOS AND XYLOPHONE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DENA 



THORNTON 



CAI^YLL & FLYNN 

' Prima Donna and Irish Tenor 

Of VARIED OFFERING OF MELODY IN VAUDEVILLE 



WHITE BROS 

Xlic Tip -Top Boys 

Direction Lew Colder 



GILMORE & LeMOYNE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DANCING VIOLINIST 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Beatrice McKenzie 

in a Singins Novelty Assisted by RAYE DUNN 

Direction FRANK EVANS 



EDDIE ( MARGIE BILLY 

De Lite, Stew art, Hardy 



20th Century Trio in Song-, Dance and Patter 



Rep. Tom Jonae 




And Brazil!; 

Always working. There's a Reason 



Nuts 

Ask MARK LEVY 



d a v e: 



FRED 



FOX *n° MAYO 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction LEW l.Ml.lg 



AMERICA'S FAVORITE 

BARNEY O'MARA 



Singing Irish Comedian 



In Vaudeville 



Dave Stattoa 



Dewey W«rta«U»» 



4-DANGING DEMONS-4 



ACROBATIC, ECCENTRIC AND RUSSIAN DANCING 



Lillian William. 



Direction, Chas. Ftctpatrick 



Made* Davis 



THERESA L. MARTIN 



In Vaudeville] 

N. V. A. 



Featuring. Hawaiian String Quartet 

BIRLINGTON FOUR 



y 

In "Hokemvllle" 

PERSONAL DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 




Assisted by FLOR D'ALIZA 
Presenting Their Wonderful Rooster* 
Chas. Borahaupt Keeps Them Crowing. 



JACK M. SYDNEY 

Versatile Entertainer Singing and Comedy 

Of VAUDEVILLE 



MADGE LOCK 

THE GLOOM DISPELLER 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



KATE MULLINI PRESENTS 



6 ROYAL HUSSAR GIRLS 



In a Melange of Music and Song 



In Vaude»ule 



ANDREW COPELAND 

America's Premier Colored Singing Comedian 

Direction— PETE MACK. IN VAUDEVILLE 



ADA 



PAULINE 



Billsbury and Robison 

Comedy, Singing, Talking and Dancing N. V. A. Direction Frank Evans 



LEW SHARP 



RUBE GOLDIE 



S MERRY YOUNGSTERS 

Fun — Fast and Furious 
HARRY GOODMAN JOHN GREEN MACK COLEMAN 

DIRECTION LEE EUCIEHFUSS Jane «•«, Bridcaport, Conn.; 7-* w.trrbury. Conn. 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



W. U. B. O. 

HEW YORK CITY. 
Palace — Morgan Daneera — Bert Baker A Co. — 
Campbell Sisters — Ray and Gordon Dooley. (Fire 
to OIL)' 

Biverslde — Dorothy Toye — Meehan'a Dogs — Julia 
Arthur — Rockwell A Wood — Barnard Granville— 
El Bey Bitten — Beaumont & Arnold. 

Boyil— Walter Brower— Gaylord & Langtcm — 
Dancing Kennedya— Florrle MlHereaip — Lamb A 
Morton. 

BROOKLYN. 
Hew' Brighton— Frank Cramlt — "For Pity's 
Sake" — Laurie ft Branson — The Volunteers — Ber- 
nard ft Janla — Florence Moore ft Bro. — Milt Collins 
— Harold Do Kane A Co. — Alexander Bros. — Ferry. 
Henderson's — Stantons — Three Alex — Kennedy ft 
Burke — Fay Templeton — Harry Carroll — Bert Mel- 
rose—Dunbar's Darkles— La Palerlca — Albertlna 
Batch. 

Bushwick— K> lie Eakcr— William I. RelUy— 
-Corner Store." (Five to Oil.) 

BT/XTAXO, IT. Y. 
Shea's— Nip ft Tuck — Bad Snelder ft Co. — Mr. ft 
Mrs. Melbourne— Stan Stanley Trio. 
BOSTON, MASS. 
Keith's — Emma Stevens — Al & Fannie Steadman 
—Five MetxetUa— Eadle ft Ramsden— Chas. T. 
Aldrlcb— Conroy ft Le Malre — Sprague ft McNeece 
—Fred Bowers ft Co.— Goelet. Harris ft Montague. 
DETROIT, MICH. 
Temple — Verd ft Vercl — Bmma Cams ft Co. — 
Ward ft Faye — Bogarr Troupe — Doe O'Neill — F. ft 
A. A'stair— "Miniature Review"— Keno, Keyea ft 
Melrose. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH, 
Klootrio Fark — Llbonatl — Wilson ft Aubrey Trio 
— Lenora— Page, Back ft Mack — Kelso ft Letghton. 

PWTT.AT1TT.P 1TTA, pft, 

Keith's— Nelson Waring— Maryland Singers— 
Cross ft Josephine — Nat Wills — J. Conley ft Co. — 
Stelndel Bros. — Nat Nazarro— Bice, Elmer ft Tom 
— Win. Ebbs. 

WASHINGTON, D. O. 
Keith's — Nora Bayes — S. ft H. Konna — Gustavo— 
Mickey Bros.— AveUng ft Lloyd— Girl With 1000 
Byes— Sterling ft Marguerite — Robins. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO. 
Majestic — Belle Story — Rosalind Coghlan ft Co. 
—"In tbe Trenches" — Artie Mehllnger — The Dot- 
tons — H. ft A. Seymour — Eddie Carr ft Co. — Three 
Vagrant! — Beeman ft Anderson. 

LOUISVILLE, XT. 
Fontaine ' Ferry Park — Jas. Thompson ft Co. — 
Adair ft Adelphl— Etbellng McDonough — Stuart ft 
Eeeley — Carson Bros. 

LOS ANOELE8. GAL. 
Orpheum — Evelyn Nesblt — Callate Conant— Leach 
Wallen Trio — Dorothy Brenner — Ray Snow — Nat 
Goodwin— Ollvattl, MoBet ft Claire— Bay Cox. 
BT. LOUIS, MO. 
Forest Park Highlands— Gertrude Barnes — Chas. 
r, Semon — Hooper ft Marbnry — Benny ft Woods — 
The Seebacks. 

BAH FRANCISCO, OAL. 
Orpheum— Margaret Anglln ft Co.— Wlule Wes- 
ton — Asabl Troupe — Jessie Bualey ft Co. — Norton ft 
Nicholson — Clifford ft Wills — Vera Berliner. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

MEW YORK CITY. 

American (First Half)— Marino Japs— Black ft 
Milford— Jawett ft Pendleton— Bert ft Paoll— Lew 
Cooper ft Co.— Little Dot— Congressman Kitty— 
Sidney Folks. (Lsat Half) — Marshall ft Weltou — 
Bernevlcl Broa.— "Memories"— Helen Vincent— 
Chaa. C. Rice ft Co. — Moss ft Frey. 

Boulevard (First Half)— Frank Ward— Sampson 
ft Douglas — Beaux ft Belles — Bush ft Shapiro — 
Paul ft Pauline. (Last Half)— The Valdos — 
Amoros ft Mulvey — Ward ft Curran— Jan. Rubin! 
— Martians. 

Avenue B (First Halt)— Kimball ft Kenneth— 
Sullivan ft Mason — Stewart ft Lewla. (Last Half) 
— Vespo Duo— Lougblln 4 West— LaToy's Models. 

Oreeley Square (First Half)— Maraball ft Welton 
—Valentine Fox— Schwartz ft Clifford — Ward ft 
Curran— Leo ft Mae Jackson. (Last Half)— Paul 
ft Pauline — Moore, White ft Bliss— Martini . ft 
MsrlmlUlan— Howard A Sadler— Bert ft Paoll— 
Betting Bettys. 

Delanoey Street (First Halt) — Dolly & Cslame — 
Belle Rutland — "Shot at Sunrise" — Mumford ft 
Thompson — Bernevlcl Bros. (Last Half) — Noack — 
Wood ft Halperln — Granville ft Mack — Valyda ft 
Brazilian Nuts— Chas. Bellly — Congressman Kitty. 

Lincoln Square (First Half )— Billy ft Ada White 
— Frazer. Bonce ft Hardy — O'Neill Sisters — Mr. ft 
Mrs. Thomas — Franz Bush — Martini ft Maxlmllllaa. 
(Last Half)— Jewett ft Pendleton — Fred Rogers — 
Sampson ft Douglaa — Anthony Andre ft Co. — Bush 
ft Shapiro. 

National (First Half)— La Belle Carmen Trio— 
Dotson — Howard ft Sadler — Betting Bettys — Jan 
Rnblnl. (Laat Half)— Dorothy Southern Trio- 
Homer ft DuBard — Cliff Dean ft Co. — Frank Bush— 
Nolan ft Nolan. 

Orpheum (First Half)— Dorothy Southern Trio— 
>'red Sogers — Moore. White & Bliss— Chas. O. Rice 
ft Co,— Brady ft Maboney— Chyo ft Chyo. (Last 
Half)— Nora ft Sydney Kellog — Baker ft Bogera — 
Henry ft Adelaide — Manning Sisters — Lew Cooper 
* Co.— The Randalls. ' 

Seventh ATaBfle (First Half) — Noack— Henry ft 
Adelaide— Marion ft Wlllard — Cliff Dean ft Co.- - 
Andy Lewis a Co.— The Randalls. (Lsst Half)— 
Del Gardo Pour— Dotson— Mr. ft Mrs. Thomas— 
Sydney Falke— "Surprise Party." 
BROOKLYN. 

Bijou (First Half)— Nora ft Sydney KeUog— 
Valyda ft Brazilian Nuts— Chas. Bellly— Nolan ft 
Nolan. (Last Half)— Dolly ft' Calame— Black ft 
Milford— Belle Rutland — Dinklns. Barr ft Evans — 
Andy Lewla ft Co. — Leo ft Mae Jackson. 

DaSalb (First Half)— Tbe Frltches— Homer ft 
DuBard— Dinklns. Everett ft Co.— Helen Vincent— 
"Surprise Party." (Lsst Half)— Frank Ward— 
O Neiil Sisters— Schwartz ft Clifford— Valentine 
Vox — Mnmford ft Thompson — Beam ft Belles. 

Warwick (First Half)— DnVal ft Simons— La 
Toy's Models. (Last Half)— Payne ft Nesbltt— 
Imperial Six— Sullivan ft Mason. 



VM&BEWSLLE MELMS 

F&ir Nmasft W®«& 



Fulton (First Half)— DelGardo Four — Amoros ft 
Mulvey — Lambertl— Senator Murphy — Manning Sts- 
tera. (Laat Half) — Little Dot— Frazer. Bunce ft 
Hardy — Brady ft Mahoney — '"Shot at Sunrise" — 
Chyo ft Chyo. 

Palace (First Half) — Vespo Duo— Lougblln ft 
West. (Last Half)— Kimball ft Kenneth— Stewart 
ft Lewis. 

BALTIMORE, MS. 

Hippodrome—Kate 4 Wiley — Ward ft Shubert — 
Denni ft Perrl — Hans Roberts ft Co.— Both Roye — ■ 
Baseball Four. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Orpheum (First Half) — Harlequin Trio — Jack 
Kennedy ft Co. — Three Tlvoll Glrla — Ad Hoyt'a 
Minstrels— Jolla Cards. (Last Half )— Kennedy 
ft Kramer— Marshall ft Covent— "Her First Case" 
— Rob ft Robertson — Old Homestead Four— Jamea 
Llchter. 

St. James (First Half)— Norton ft Noble — Mar- 
shall & Covert — "Tbe Alibi" — Smith & Kaufman — 
Gypsy Songsters. (Lsst Half) — Orben 4 Dixie — . 
Elks Trio— Chas. Deland ft Co.— Wllla Holt Wake- 
field— Harms Trio. 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

Bijou (First Half)— Kennedy 4 Kramer— Rob 4 
Robertson — "Her First Case" — James Llchter— Old 
Homestead Four. (Last Half) — Harlequin Trio — 
Three Tlvoll Girls — Jack Kennedy 4 Co. — Julia 
Curtis— Ad Hoyt'a Minstrels. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. 

Loews (First Half) — Forrest 4 Church — Lew 
Welch ft Co.— Gallagher 4 Martin. (Laat Half) — 
DnVal 4 Simons. 

PROVIDENCE, B. I. 

Majestic (First Half)— Orben ft Dixie— Baker ft 
Rogers— Elks Trio— Chas. Deland ft Co.— Wllla 
Holt Wakefield— Harms Trio. (Last Half)— Nor- 
ton ft Noble — "Tbe Alibi" — Smith & Kaufman — 
Gypsy Songsters. 

TORONTO, CAN 
Yonge Street — Fredericks & Palmer — Gertie De- 
Mllt — Jones ft Johnson — "Dream Garden" — Willie 
Solar— Six Imps anil a Girl. 

POU CIRCUIT 

BRIDOEPORT, CONN. 
Poll (First Half)— Walter Ward ft Useless— 
Hoyt, Msnlon ft Hyama — Allen ft Francis — Ray- 
mond Wylte— Mr. Inquisitive. (Last Half)— Lowry 
ft Lacey Sisters — Musical Britons — Lulu Coats — 
Lady Agnes ft Irish Colleens. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 
Poll (First Half l Ni-lm.u ft Csstlf — Cbsppelle ft 
Trlbbles. (Last Half) — Raymond Wyllc. 

Palace (First Half)— John Stone—Capes ft Snow 
—"Street Urchin"— Lady Agnese ft Irish Colleens. 
(Lest Half)— Uuzxell ft Little— Harry Cooper ft 
Co. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
Bijou (First Half)— Musical Britons— VentU 
Gould— Itlce ft Werner — Four Newsomes. (Last 
Half)— O*o. Huasey — Capaa ft Snow — "Street 
Urchin" — Bon Voyage." ' 

8CRANTON, PA. 
Poll (First Half)— Kitard Japs— Milsnl Five. 
(Last Half)— Wyatt'a Scotch Lads ft Lassies. 
WORCESTER, MASS. 
Pali (First Half)— Dean ft Thatcher— Lowry ft 
Lacey Bisters— Harry Cooper ft Co. — "Bon Voy- 
age." (Last Half)— Venlta Gould. 

Plaza (First Half)— Geo. Hussey— Butzell ft 
Little. (Last Half)— Nelson ft Caatle— Cbappelle 
ft Trlbbles. 

S. & C. CIRCUIT 

DETROIT. MICH. 
Miles— Orrin Craig Trio— Dorothy Da Schelle ft 
Co. — Cstb. Cameron ft Co. — Berquist Bros. 

FATtOO. N. TJ. 
Grand (Flret Half) — College Quintette— Ross 4 
Asbton — The Currellaa — Miss Hlmlna . ft Co. — Law- 
rence Crane ft Co. (Last Half)— BUI ft Bob Mil- 
lard — Clark's Gypsy Girls— Senate Duo— Williams 
ft Held. 

JANE8VIXLE, WIS. 
Apollo (Laat Half)— La Palva— Zeda ft Hoot- 
Cooper ft Hlckey — Expoaltlon Four. 
MASON CITY. IA. 

Cecil (First Half) — Frank Franc — Rogers ft 
Mack. (Last Half)— Guy Trio— Miss Blmlna ft 
Co. 

MARSHAIXTOWN, IA. 
Casino (Laat Half) — Reml Duo — Three Anderson 
Sisters — Frank Frsnc — Four Bards — Lawrence 
Crane ft Co. 

PONTIAC, MICH. 

Oakland— Geo. Harada — Cleora Miller Trio- 
Edith Mote— "Wedding Party"— Jessie Parker ft 

Co. 

ST. CLOUD, MINN. 

Memo (One Day) — Zeda ft Hoot — Frank Franc — 
Miss Elmlna ft Co. — College Quintette — Lawrence 
Crane ft Co. 

W. U. B. o. 

BAT OTTY, MICH. 
Weaona Beach Park — Ellla ft Ellsworth — Art 
Adair— Better Bros. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IzTD. 
English Opera House— Tbe . Tvrells— Mitchell ft 
Mitch— "A Fireside Reverie"— Gen. Plsano ft Co. 
— "Maid o' the Movies." 

LOOANBPOHT, DTD. 
Colonial (First Half)— Boothby ft Everdeen— C. 
Francis Relener — Three Flsherm. (Last Half) — 
Dotson — Harry ft Etta Conley — Wheeler ft Dolan. 



Trr ■ V • rVl* A. 

BTTJ.TN08, MONT. 

Babooek (June 26) — Bedford ft Gardner — Murray 
ft Love — Newell ft Most — Six Musical Harvards — 
Joe Bolley— Laypo ft Benjamin. (July 1. 2) — 
June ft Irene Melva — Chaa. Rogers ft Co. — Louis 
London ft Ternan Arabs. 

BUTTE, MONT. 

Empress (June 24-26) — KartelU — The McFarlanda 
— Story ft Clark — Arthur LaVlne ft Co. — Daisy 
Harcourt — Roeder'a Inventions. (June 27-30) — 
Williams DeHollls- Sherwood ft Sherwood— Mel- 
ville ft Milne — Ned Nestor's Sweethearts— Henry 
Rudolph— Ed ft Lottie Ford. 

CRO0KSTON, MINN. 

Grand (June 24) — Kane ft Wagner — Mme. Marion 
— Cosmopolitan Trio. 

DUXUTH, MINN. 

Nsw Grand (First Half)— Mosaman ft Vance — 
Davis ft Lilt— "Garden of Aloha." (Laat Half)— 
Florence Gladioli— "College Girl FroUcs" — Tower 

ft Darrell. 

EAST ST. LOUIS. ILL. 
Erber'a (First Half)— The Larneds — Odonne — 
Bobby ft Nelson— Wheeler ft Dolan. (Last Half) 
— Seabnry ft Price — F'alrman ft Patrick — Loose ft 
Sterling. 

FORT WILLIAM, CAM. 
Orpheum (June 29, 26) — The Olmsteads — June 
Mills ft Co.— Lillian Steele Trio— Dunedln Duo. 
GREAT FALLS, MONT. 
Palace (June 28) — Curtis' Comedy Canines — 
Emily Darrell— Nalo ft Nalo— Alice Nelson ft Co. — 
Beaala LaCount — Wllle Broa. (June 30. July 1) — 
Bedford ft Gardner — Murray ft Love — Newell ft 
Moat — Six Musical Harvards — Joe Bolley — Laypo ft 
Benjamin. 

GRAND FORKS. TND. 

Grand (Eaat Half)— Lockhart ft Laddie— Mor- 
gan, Flelda ft 8nyder — Gypsy Brigands. 
HELENA, MONT. 

Liberty (June 25)— William DeHollls— Sherwood 
ft Sherwood— Melville 4 Milne — Ned Nestor's 
Sweethearts— Henry Rudolph— Ed. ft Lottie Ford. 
(June 29) — Curtis Comedy Csnlnes — Emily Darrell 
— Nalo ft Nalo— Alice Nelson ft Co. — Bessla La 
Count — Wllle Bros. 

INTERNATIONAL FALLS, MTNW. 

Grand (June 27)— The Olmsteads— June Mills ft 
Co. — Lillian Steele Trio — Dunedln Duo. 

LEWTSTOWH, MONT. 
Judith (Jane 26) — Curtis' Comedy Canines — 
Emily Darrell— Nalo ft Nalo — Alice Nelson ft Co. — ■ 
Beasle LaCount— Wllle Bros. (June 20)— Belford 
ft Gsrdner — Murray ft Love — Newell ft Moat — 
Six Musical n,rr»n1» — Jo* Bolley — Laypo 4 Ben- 
jamin. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Palaoa— Five Violin Beauties — Dan Ahearn — 
"1017 Girl Revue" — Moore, Gardner ft Rose — Leon 
Slaters ft Co. 

Hew Grand— Kane ft Wagner— Mme. Marlon — 
Cosmopolitan Trio— Sebastian Merrill ft Co. 
NORTH YAKIMA, WASH. 
Empire (June 24, 20) — Marts Genaro — Bar 4 
Neville — Lew Hoffman — Bijou Minstrel Misses—' 
Roth 4 Roberts — Radium Models. (June 20-30) — 
Mnslcal Blue Birds — Chsdwlck 4 Taylor — Robey 
Trio — Four Old Veterans — I.ouls London 4 Fred 
Zobedle 4 Co. 

OAKLAND, OAL. 
Hippodrome (June 24, 28) — Smlllette Sisters — 
The Balkans — Bkelly 4 Helt — LeBoy 4 Harvey — 
Fitch Cooper— "The Fashion Shop." (June 27-30) 
■ - Nelson Sisters — Keane 4 Foxwortb— J. C. Lewis 
Jr. ft Co. — Adolpho— Lucy Gillette. 
PORTLAND, OBE. 
Hippodrome (Jane 24-27) — Blanche LeDuc ft Co. 
—Edna Bless ft Co.— Billy Noble ft Jeanne 
Brooks — Musical Lands — Psuline Saxon — Mennrtti 
4 SIdeUl. (Jane 28-80) — Florence Duo — Dorotby 
Hayes 4 Co. — Begley 4 Rowland — "Witching Boor 
Wltchea" — Hller's Novelty— John A. West. 
SPOKANE, WASH. 
Hippodrome (June 24-26) — Arnold 4 Page — 
Gruet, Kramer ft Cruet — Bodway ft Edwards — 
Fremont Benton ft Co. — Chas. ft Msbel Dunbsr — 
Flying Venus. (June 27-50)— Harry Watklns— 
Gerald ft Griffin — Fields, Keane ft Walsh— 
"Echoes of Broadway"— Permane — Don Roberts ft 
Co. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

Palace Hippodroms (June 24-27)— Florence Duo 
—Dorothy Hayea 4 Co. — Begley ft Howland— 
"Witching Hour Witches"— Hller's Novelty — John 
A. Weat. (Jane 28-30)— Kawana Bros.— Bessie 
Lester— Selble ft LllUe— Princess Ks— Newport- ft 
Stirk— Boy Hsrrsb ft Girls. 

SAN JOSE. OAL. 
Victory (June 24-26) — Zeb Zarrow Troupe — Nel- 
son Sisters — Kesne ft Foxwortb — J. C. Lewis Jr. 
ft Co. — Adolpho — Lacy Gillette. (June 27-30)— 
Leonard ft Louhl — Garrlty Slaters — Norton Bros. — 
1 Moste Carlo Sextette — Dot Marsell — Heyasht Japs. 

SACRAMENTO. OAL. . 
Empress (June 24-26)— Leonsrd ft Louts — Gar- 
rlty Slaters— Norton Bros. — Monte Carlo Sextette 
— Dot Marsell — Hsysshl Japs. (Jane 27-30) — 
Van Perre 4 Van Perre — Rambler Sisters — 
Walters ft Walters — Patrlcola ft Myers — Leon ft 
Adeline Sisters. 



BT. LOUIS. HO. 

Park (First Half)— Three pXylopblends— Mildred 
Hayward— Will Stanton ft: Co.— Van DeBell*. 
(Last Half) — Broalos ft Brown — Odonne— Bert 
Walnrlgbt ft Co.— Lane ft Harper— Degnoo ft 
Clifton. 

Empress (First Half)— Valentine ft Ball- 
Walters ft Kantor— Scott ft Tierney— Falrman ft 
Patrick— Areo Bros. (Last Half)— The Larneds— 
Harry Dixon— Billy Swede HsU ft Co.— Casting 
Lammys. 

Sky dome (First Us If)— Loose ft Sterling— Lewis 
ft Leopold— Mareeno, Nevaro ft Marecao. (Laat 
Half) — Gerald Griffin — Walters 4 Kautor — Van 4 
Belle. 

SUPERIOR, WIS. 

Palace (First Half)— Three Keeleys— Clifton ft 
Cramer — Jack Case— Tom Brown's Blackface 
Revue. (Last Half)— Oypay Meredith ft Co.— 
Alfred Latell— Hugo Latgeas. 

SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 

Oasine — DeVelde ft Nelda— Seymour ft Williams 
William Morrow 4 Co. — Colonial Belle*— Billy 

Brown — ricolo Midgets — K*ou«b Stater* — Janla 4 

Weat — John ft Nellie Olms— Downey, Wlllard ft 

Irwin— Ives, Farnaworth ft Weaver— Takata Jape. 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Mew Palao* (First Half) — Oypay Meredith ft 
Co.— Florence Gladioli— College Girl Frolics— Tower 
ft Darrell— Need Act. (Last Half)— Tokayo 
Troupe — Connors ft Juyeh-Need Act — Hayes A 
Ives— Fire Emigrants. 

TAOOMA, WASH. 

Regent (June 24-27) — Kawana Bros.— Bessie 
Lealer— Selble 4 Lillle — Princess Ka— Newport 4 
Stirk— Boy Harrah 4 Girls. (Laat Half)— Maris 
Genaro — Dae ft Neville— Lew Hoffman— BUou 
Minstrel Misses — Roth ft Roberts — Radlam Modal*. 
VIBODnA, XZsTH. 

Lyrio (Last Hslf) — Mosaman ft Vance — Darts ft 
Lltt — "Garden of Aloha." 

WINNIPEG. CAN. 

Strand (First Half )— Lockhart ft Laddie — Jerry 
ft Gretchen O'Meara— Morgan. Flalda 4 Snyder— 
Oypay Brigands. (Laat Half)— The Olmitrada— 
June Mills ft Co.— Lillian Steele Trio — Dunedln 

Duo. . 

WALLA WALLA, WASH. 

Liberty (June 24-25)— Musical Bias Birds— 
Chsdwlck ft Taylor — Robey Trio — Four Old 
Veterans— Lords London — Fred. Zobedla ft Co. 
(June 28-30)— Arnold ft Psge— Gruet, Kramer ft 
Gruet — Rodway ft Edwards— Fremont Benton ft 
Co.— Chas. ft Madeline Dunbar— Flying Venus. 



"GOD'S MAN" SELLS FAST 

It is announced by President William 
L. Sherrill that negotiations have been 
completed and contracts entered into for 
tbe exclusive rights to "God's Man" in no 
less than thirty-two states. Among tbe 
recent purchasers arc Samuel Van Iton- 
kel, a well-known exchange man of Chi- 
cago, who has chosen "God's Man" as the 
leader for bis newly organized exchange 
enterprise. Mr. Van Ronkel acquire* 'the 
exclusive booking privileges for the stntes 
of Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin. 

MEREDITH FILMS GETS COLEMAN 

William Robert Coleman, formerly con- 
nected with Biograph and Selig, has been 
selected to direct the Brat of alx produc- 
tions starring Lois Meredith and bearing 
the star's name as the brand of release. 

PLAYS. SKETCHES WRITTEN 

Terms for 4 Stamp 

E. L. GAMBLE. Playwright 
Eaat Liverpool, Ohio 



ACTS 



30c— BIG BUNCH— 30c 

Ot Acts. Gags, Faradlas, eta. Money Bark Onsrsatsel 
Catalog for stamp. - sMIY THAYEI. 2190 trees' It. 
row., t. I. 



THEATRES AND PRODUCTIONS. 
VAUDEVILLE ACTS EQUIPPED 

New and Sexes*! Hand Senary aa Stack 

HURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO 

Colombia, T h eatre- Bld», «7th A Broadway 
Tel. Bryant Ut) Tom Creamer. Mgr. 

WANTED 

Want to make arrangements for a Carnival In 
Bloomingdale, N. J-, for week of July 4th. 
Benefit of Firemen. Population 7,000. LKROY 
B. HAYCOCK, Secy, Lock Box No. 250, But- 
ler. N. J. 

Leader at Liberty 

(Pianist) 

Vaudeville, Pictures, Hotel. Library of Stand- 
ard and Up to-Date Music. Member of A. F. 
of M. 

GLEN W. PHILLIPS 

P. O. Box ITS Nan 



THE 



MARTIANS 



In "THE ASTRONOMER'S 
DREAM OF MARS." 

Special Scenery. Everything Orislaal 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 



B. F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. rAUL KEITH. Willful K. P. ALBEE, Vl wPm . * Cea. Uav. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
r ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
; Booking Manager of the UNITED 

i OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



JARION RYAN KATHRYN RAYMER 

ARION DUO 

The Singing Janitor 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDIE 



JULIA 



SWARTZ 



CAN YOU BEER IT? 



A1VD 



CLIFFORD 



DIRECTION ARTHUR HORWITZ 



5 PANDURS 



Novelty Act in Vaudeville 



Worthy Florence 

DUFTY & DAISY 

Vaudeville's Classiest Cycling Novelty. Direction AIL T. Wilton 
Jon* 18 — Strand, Brockton; 21 — Opera House, Newport, R. I. 



MAX HART PRESENTS "OH BRAZIL" 



IIMII 




Lights Club, Freeport, this Summer 



LE ROY and BERRY 

Singing*, Peaejn e; and Comedy, Novelty. In Vaudeville 

FEENEY, MANNING ® KNOLL 

New Act by JOHN P. MEDBURY. Direction TOM JONES 

HELEN ADA 

SHEEDY and HOLT 

Singing, Dancing and Impersonations 

RUSSELL, GREENE and JONES 

Singing — Acrobatic — Dancing 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



XRD and G 
IN "THE JUGGLER'S DREAM" 

BOOKED SOUP. SAM BAERWTTZ. REP. 



IVY and IVY SmoklnT Stove 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



VELYN 



KIIM 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Marcus Loew's Enterprises 

General Executive Offices 
Putnam Building, Times Square, New York 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

General Booking Manager 



Mr. Sthewrk Personally la tans ie s Artists Daily Betwsea U aaa 1 

Boston Office: Trsill— t Theatre 

FRED MARDO, a* charr* 



Cfcic*. Ottcei Narta nnisrirsa Reflate* 
FRANK a DOYLE, as chare* 



Acta Uytas- off in Southern U s Tiluvj wire this office. 



C. H. HASKELL, Mgr.— IDA BUTLER— SAM CJLLETT1 HARMONY SINGING 

!».. THE nvE MARTELLS "WffiS? 

WEEHAWKEN, P. O* N. J. 
ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOWRY 



IN 



'Jests and Jigs" 

BY TOMMY CRAY 



SAUNDERS & CAMERON 

In Their New Variety Act — In Vaudeville 

GERTIE EVADNE Dc MILT 

THE GIRL WITH THE SMILE— IN VAUDEVILLE 

SPIEGEL and JONES 

IN A COLORED SPASM Written by OTTO T. JOHNSON 

BERNARD ADELE C. 

WHEELER & POTTER 



In a Phoney Episode 



In Vaudeville 



THE 3 ORIGINAL REG ALS 

In "THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH SHOP." Direction, LOU EDELMAN 

BOB & PEGGY VALENTINE 

"Vital Statistic*"— A New Comedy Act in "One" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

Harry K. Morton g Zella Russell 

THE LAUGH PROMOTERS 

VIRGINIA. KELSY 

DOUBLE VOICE PRIMA DONNA 



HERBERT 



TRDCIE 



HOEY ^D SIVUTH 



COMEDY— SONG— DANCE 



Direction, JACK LEWD 



HARRY KEENE & WILLIAMS M 

A Real Comedy Act in One. Special Scenery 

NOW PLAYING 

sammy — GOLD & SEAL — eu 

Those Champagne Boys in "BITS OF VARIETY" 

DIRECTION ROSE 4 CURTIS 

WHITE and GREEN f° N i Z 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



CASEY AGENCY 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 





Route* Muit Reach Tkis Office Not Later 
Than Saturday 

Barrio's J. M., Players (Chas. Frohman. Inc.. 

mgr.) — Empire, New York, Indet. 
"Brat, The" (Oliver Moroeco, mgr.) — Moros- 

co. New York, Indet 
CoUler, Wro. (H- H. Prazee, mgr.) — Long- 

acre. New York, Intel 
Cowl, Jane (Selwyn & Co., nigra,)— -Harris, 

New York, Index. 
Clarke Barry Corson and Margaret Dale 

Owen — Calcutta, India, lndet 
"Canary Cottage" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — 

Lyric Phlla., lndef. 
"Dew Drop Inn" — Illinois, Chicago, lndef. 
"Dollars and Sense" — Garrlck, Chicago, lndef. 
"Fair and Warmer" (Selwyn 4 Co., mgrs.) — 

Park sq. Boston, lndef. 
"Her Soldier Boy" (The 8buberta, mgr.) — 

Shobert New York, lndef. 
"His Little Widows" (G. M. Anderson * 

Lawrence Weber, mgrs.)— Aator, New York, 

-Knife "The" — Blipu, New York, lndef. 

•Love o' Mike" (Elizabeth, Marbury, mgr.) — 

Maxlne Elliott's, New York^ lndef. 
"Man^Who Came Back" (Wm. A^ Brady, 

mgr.)— Plahoase, New York, lndef. 
-Mary's Ankle" (A. H. Woods, mgr.)— W11-- 

bnr, Boston, lndef. 

"Uv Lady's Glove" (The Shuberts, mgrs.) — 

Lvrlc, New York, 18-lndet 
-Oh Boy" — Princess, New York, lndef. 
•Pals First" (J. Fred Zimmerman, mgr.)— 

Fnlton, New York, lndef. 
•Passing Show of 1917"— Winter Garden. 

New York, lndef* 
-Pawn, The"— Princess, Chicago, lndef. 
"Smarter Set" (C. L. Convexl. mgr.)— La- 
fayette, New York, 18-2*. ^, ... 
•■Show of Wonders"— Palace. Cnlcago, lndef. 
"Seven Chances" (David Belasco, mgr.) — 

■Sr^fjP^arW-tMH Street. New 

"mm to the Bight" (Smith 4 Golden, mgrs.) 

—Gaiety. New York, lndef. 

"Tom to the Right" (Smith * Golden, mgrs.) 

—Grand, Chicago, lndef. 
•Treasure Island" (Chas. Hopkins, mgr.) — 

Hollis, Boston, lndef. ., 

"iSor-Made Man" (Cohan 4 Harris, nigra.) 

— Tremont Boston, lndef. 
"Upstairs and Down" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 

-1-Cort, New York, lndef. 
"Very Good Eddie" (Marbury, Ctomstock Co., 

mgrs.) — Garrlck, Cnlcago, lndef. 
Washington Sq. players— Comedy, New York, 

"When Johnny Comes Marching Home" (F. 
C7 Whitney, mgr.)— Manhattan, New York, 

"You're In Love" (Arthur Hammersteln. 
mgr.) — Casino, New York, lndef 

'•Zlegfeld Follies" — New Amsterdam, New 
York, lndef. 

STOCK 

Andltorlum Players— Maiden, Mass., lndef. 

Alcaxar Players — San Francisco, lndef. 

Albec Stock (Chas. Lovenberg, mgr.) — 
Providence, B, L, lndef. 

adctU Stock (Joe Angell, mgr.)— Park, Pitts- 
burgh, Index. _ _ , « n r*v 

Broadway Players— Hurtle 4 Seamon s 125th 
Street, New York, lndef. _ . 

Bennett? Richard, Stock— San Francisco, ln- 

Bryant, Margnerlte, Players — Altoona, Pa., 

BuhUr!' Blchard. Players (A. G. Delamater, 

mgr.i— Columbus, 0„ 18-lndef. 
Bishop Players— Oakland, Cal.. lndet 
BonBtelle, Jessie, Stock— Detroit^ Index. 
Boyer, Nancy, Stock— Kalamazoo, Mich., In- 

Baldwin, Walter, Stock— Duluth. Minn., lndef. 
Blaine's, James, Players — Saskatoon, tan, in- 

Craig' Players — Castle Sq., Boston, lndef. 

Cornell-Price Flayers— Wauseon p., lndef . 

Colombia Stock — Mllford. Del., 18-23. 

Colonial 8tock— Cleveland. O, lndef. 

Desmond, Mae Co. (Ed. Cnddy, mar.) — 
Schenectady, N. Y, lndef. 

Dainty, Bessie, Players (I. E. Earle, mgr.) — 
Dallas, Tex., lndef. 

Denham Players — Denver, lndef. _ 

Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.) — Sharps- 
burg, Pa, lndef. „ . * . 

Emerson Players — Lowell. Mass.. lndet 

Pelbcr A Shea Stock — Akron, O., lndef. 

Garden Theatre. Stock — Kansas City, Mo., 

Glaser. Vaughan. Stock — AlTin, Pittsburgh, 

Gordinler Bros., Stock — Ft Dodge, la., lndef. 

Glnnlvan Dram. Co.— BUssfleld, Mich., 17-23. 

Home, CoL F. P., Stock — Youngstown, O., ln- 
def. 

Jewett, Henry, Players — Copley, Boston, ln- 
def. ' 

Keith's Hudson Theatre, Stock — Union Hill, 
N. J, lndet 

Keith Stock— Portland, Me., lndef. 

Knickerbocker Players — Syracuse, N. Y., ln- 
det . , . 

Lawrence, DeL, Stock — San Francisco, lndef. 

Lyric Theatre Stock — Bridgeport, Conn., ln- 
def. ' _ 

Lyric Light Opera Co.— -Providence, R. I- 
Indet 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, lndef. 

Manhattan Players — Rochester, N. Y., lndef. 

McWatters & Webb Stock — Saginaw, Micb., 
lndef. 

Majestic Theatre Stock — Milwaukee, lndef. 

Miller, Henry. Stock — San Francisco, lndef. 

New Strand Stock — Mobile, Ala., lndef. 

Opera Players — Hartford, Conn., lndet 

Orpheum Players (Geo. Ebey, mgr.) — Oak- 
land, CaL. lndef. 



Oliver. Otis, Players (Harry J. Wallace, mgr.) 

— Lincoln, Nebr., lndef. 
Oliver, Otis, Players— Richmond, Ind., lndef. 
Orpheum Players (Clark Brown, mgr.) — • 

Montreal. Can- lndet 
Poll Players-Spoil's, Washington, lndet 
Poll Players — Worcester, Mass.. lndef. 
Price, Stanley, Players — Grand Rapids, 

Mich., lndet 
Robins, Edward, Stock— Toronto, Can., lndef. 
Shuoert Stock — St. Paul, Minn. 
Somervllle Theatre Players — Somerville, 

Mass., lndet 
St Clair, Winifred, Stock (Earl SIpe, mgr.)— 

Trenton. N. J., lndef. 
Spooner, Cecil, 8tock — Bridgeport Conn., ln- 
det 
Tolcr, Sydney, Stock — Portland, Me, lndet 
Temple Stock — Hamilton, Can., lndef. 
Van Dyke & Baton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 

Joplln, Mo., lndef. 
Vees. Albert Stock — Wheeling, W. Va., lndet 
Wadswortb Dram. Stock (Edward Orasteln, 

mgr.) — Toledo, O., lndef. 
Williams, Ed.. Stock — Elkhart Ind.. lndef. 
Williams, Kd.. Stock — Qulncy. 111., lndet 
Woods, Lew, Stock — Syracuse, N. Y., lndet 
Walker, Stuart, Players — Indianapolis, lndef. 

Wilkes' Players— Seattle, Wash., lndet 
COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS 

Permanent and Traveling 

Enterprise Stock Co. (Norman Hllyard, mgr.) 
— Cnlcago, indet 

Enterprise Stock Co., No. 2 Co. (Norman Hll- 
yard, mgr J — Chicago, lndet 
Gramlick's, Cbas, Follies of the Day — Moose 

Jaw, Can., lndet 
Minstrel Maids Bevue (F. Li Bowman, mgr.) 

— Portland, Me., 18-lndef. 
McLeod's Birds of Paradise (Ray Adair, mgr.) 

— -StenbenvUxc, O, lndef. 
McLeod's Isle of Rosea (Arthur McLeod, 

mgr.) — Youngstown, O., lndef. 
Reldway 4 Burton M. C. Co. — Mlnot, N. !>., 

lndef. 
Stewart's, Jack, 191T Girl Review — Grand 

Forks, N. D„ 21-23 ; Minneapolis, Minn., 25- 

30. 
Tabarln Girls (Dave Newman, mgr.) — Apollo, 

Pa,, 18-23. 
Walker's Mnslc Bugs (Ed. M. Moore, mgr.) — 

OU City. Pa., 18-23. 
Zarrow's American Girl Co. — Mansfield, O., 

18-20. Barterton, 21-23. 
Zarrow's Little Bluebird Co. (Jack Fuquay, 

mgr.) — Ashtabula, O, 18-23. 
Zarrow^s Variety Review (D. J. Lynch, mgr.) 

— McKeesport, Pa., 18-20 ; Greenville, 21- 

23. 

CARNIVALS 

Acme Amuse. Co. — Boonton, N. J., 18-23. 
Clifton-Kelly Shows — Chicago Heights, 111, 

18-23. 
De Vaux Greater Shows — Harrisburg, 111., 18- 

23. 
Eastern Amuse. Co. — Augusta. Me, 18-23. 
Evans, Ed. A, Shows — Watertown, Wis., 18- 

28. 
Ferarl. CoL Francis, Shows — Newcastle, Pa., 

18-28. 
Great American Showa — Kalamasoo. Mich.. 

18-23. 
Great Patterson Shows — Belolt, Wis., 18-23. 
Heinz Bros. Shows — Dundee, TIL, 18-23. 
Kennedy. Con T., Shows — Phlla., 18-23. 
Metropolitan Shows — Portsmouth, Va, 18-23. 
Savldge, Walter, Amuse. Co. — Rnshvllle, Neb, 

18-23. 
Washburn's Leon, Mighty Midway Shows — 

Bayonne, N. J, 18-30. 
World at Home Shows — Helena, Mont, 18-23 ; 

Great Falls. 25-30. 
Zeldman 4 Pollle Shows — Milwaukee, 18-30. 

CIRCUSES 

Barnes, AL G. — Ellensburg, Wash, 20: Top- 

Benlsb. 21 ; Kennewlck, 22 : Walla Walla. 
3: Pendleton, Ore, 23 ; LaGrande, 26 ; 

Baker. 27 ; Welser, 28 ; Namba, 20 : Boise, 

SO. 
Cook Bros.— Port Clinton. O, 21; Morenci, 

Mich., 22 ; Hudson, 23 ; Tecumseh, 25 ; 

Ypsllanti. 26 ; Oxford, 27j Lapeer, 28 ; 

Vassar, 29. 
Hagenbeck- Wallace — Cedar Rapids, la., 21 : 

Waterloo, 22: Rochester, Minn, 23. 
La Tena's — Cheboygan, Mich, 20 ; St Ignace, 

21 ; Newbury, 22 ; Marquette, 23. 
Rlngllng Bros. — New Bedford, Maes., 20 : P»ll 

River, 21 ; Worcester. 22 ; Springfield, 23 ; 

Albany, N. Y, 25 ; Schenectady. 26 : Utlca, 

27 : Syracuse, 28 ; Rochester, 29 : Niagara 

Falls, 30. 

BANDS AND ORCHESTRAS 

Pryor, Arthur — Willow Grove Park. Phlla, 
lndef. 

Tinker's Singing Orchestra — Norway, Me, 20 : 
Saco, 21 ; Brldgton, 22 : Auburn, 23 : Island 
Park, Augusta, Me, July 3-Sept 3. 

White Hussars (Al Sweet, dir.) — Altoona, Pa, 
20 : Ebensburg. 21 : Homestead. 22 ; Craf ton, 
23 ; Brownsville, 24 ; Connellsvllle. 25 ; 
Morgantown, W. Va, 26: Fairmont 27; 
Unlontown, 28 : Scottsdalej 29 ; Greens- 
burg, SO. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Adams, James, Floating Theatre — Onancock, 
Va, 18-23. 

Rlplev's Picture 4 Vaude. Show — Delpbia 
Fails, N. Y., 18-23: Fayetteville, 25-30. 

Saunder's Amuse. Co. (Sherman H. Wicks, 
mgr.) — Patchogue, N. Y, 20: Port Jeffer- 
son, 21 : Shelter Island, 22 ; Greenport, 23 ; 
SayvlUe. 25. 



SHOW REVIEWS 



(Continued from pages T 



n> 



REGENT 

There -was a capacity audience on hand 
for the opening show of the week and 
many were the marks of approval ex- 
tended to the various acts. 

The vaudeville portion of the bill waa 
started by Esmeralda and Avalina, two 
women expert xylophonists. They opened 
with operatic selections, followed with the 
overture from "William Tell," and then 
gave a popular rag. For a finish they 
played a medley made up of "Columbia," 
"Marching Through Georgia," "Dixie," 
"Yankee Doodle," and a dozen more such 
numbers, most of which were made popu- 
lar during the Civil War. Esmeralda is 
one of the best women xylophonists New 
York has heard, and her partner is also 
an excellent performer. The four numbers 
they offered were capitally played and 
they fully deserved the hearty recogni- 
tion extended to them. 

Austin and Bailey, a black face team, 
were seen as "The Hotel Bell Boys." They 
open with a song and dance and follow 
with patter made up of quips and jokes. 
Then the shorter of the boys sings, and 
his partner follows, also with a song. 
For a finish, they change from their bell 
boy suits, the taller of the team appear- 
ing aa a wench with his partner in a dress 
suit and do eccentric dancing. These boys 
are clever performers. They are capital 
dancers, know how to put their songs 
over, and make the most of their patter, 
which is good laugh making material. 
They appeared in one, with a special drop, 
and were so well liked that they were 
forced to respond to an encore. 

Phil Dwyer & Co., man, woman and 
young girl, appeared in their sketch "My 
Dog Rover." The skit tells the story of 
how a little girl, with the assistance of 
her pet dog, Rover, changes her step- 
mother, harsh and ill-tempered, into a 
woman of kindly disposition. 

The child and dog, tiring of the ill-tem- 

■r of the woman, conspire to frighten 
ler, and the dog puts on a lion's skin. 
The woman is thoroughly frightened and 
agrees to anything if the child will save 
her from the beast. 

Dwyer carries the burden of the act. 
He is one of our very best "animal actors" 
and, first as the dog and then as the lion, 
he does capital work. The girl and the 
woman aie good feeders. 

Cooper and Carlton, two men, straight 
and Hebrew comedian, presented a com- 
edy, singing and talking turn. They have 
good material, which fulfills its mission 
and gets laughs. For their song numbers, 
the straight sings a verse, and his partner 
follows with another that has a strong 
comedy punch. They are very clever en- 
tertainers and put over every line of their 
patter. They scored a pronounced hit and 
could easily have taken an encore. 

Paul and Pauline, man and woman, pre- 
sented a Soman ring act which is a little 
differently executed than the average ring 
act. Paid begins by slowly pulling him- 
self up to a hand-stand on the rings, dur- 
ing the process of which Pauline and he 
keep up a line of comedy patter in which 
the "joke" is always on him. Later, she 
changes from a walking dress to knicker- 
bockers and does her bit on the rings. 
She does some iron jaw work, making a 
short swing, and then her partner holds 
her with his teeth and they do a giant 
swing. The merit of their act is not so 
much in what they do as how they do it. 
They are good gymnasts, make a good ap- 
pearance and do not overdo the talk which 
they introduce. They met with well-de- 
served success. 

The movie fans had a good bill of fare 
handed to them. The big feature in this 
line was "The Immigrant," with Charley 
Chaplin as the star. A Chaplin feature is 
always sure of pleasing the masses, and 
this, his latest, is no exception to the 
rule. While it may not be considered as 
funny as some of the Chaplin pictures 
which have preceded it, because, it con- 
tains less horse play, it is not the less 
funny, and gets plenty of laughs. K. W. 



he: 



JEFFERSON 

Collier and De Wald, man and woman, 
present a skatorial offering, in which they 
both exhibit some excellent roller skating, 
although it received but little recognition. 
The skating done by the woman, between 
the bottles, was appreciated. 

Dotson, a colored singing and dancing 
comedian, is certainly adept when it comes 
to soft shoe dancing. He rendered a few 
songs, but it is his stepping which he puts 
over big. He is billed as the Dancing 
Demon and bears out the title. 

The numbers, which he called the skat- 
ing dance, the corkscrew dance, the Russian 
dance, and especially the one of his own 
invention, got considerable applause. 

"In Old Madrid" is an operatic offer- 
ing, in which two men and two women 
participate. Their selections are all ren- 
dered well, the women especially possessing 
good voices and excelling the men in noise. 

They offer a popular repertoire, includ- 
ing the "Barcarolle," marching song from 
"Faust," "La Espagnole," the quartette 
from "Rigoletto," and the Toreador song 
from "Carmen." Their method of pre- 
sentation is pleasing and each selection 
was accorded a big reception. 

Bernard and Lloyd, presenting their 
comedy skit, entitled, "See My Lawyer," 
were easily the laughing hit of the bill. 
Bernard is a clever comedian and furnishes 
continual laughter. The lines surrounding 
the Hebrew suing the traction company 
for damages, because he was thrown off a 
car, provide plenty of comedy. The song 
rendered by Lloyd was liked. 

Charlie Chaplin, in the picture "The 
Immigrant" took the place of an act 
The vehicle afforded Chaplin an oppor- 
tunity to perform bis inimitable laugh- 
provoking stunts and the picture provides 
! much merriment 

"The Lesson" was a dramatic offering 
with a mora] that was good entertainment, 
as well. It teaches a lesson in honesty 
being the best policy and is n well con- 
structed playlet with a well-defined plot. 
The sketch contains interest and was thor- 
oughly enjoyed by the audience here. 

A woman finds a purse with $400 in it, 
and tells her husband she intends to keep 
It He is remonstrating with her when 

a neighbor enters and tearfully announces 
that she has lost a purse containing that 
amount The purse has no marks of 
identification and the wife, not knowing 
the owner, refuses to give it up. 

The husband is going to return it but 
his wife discovers that she has lost a purse 
and, also, some money of her own. It 
develops that he has found it and returns 
the money to the neighbor, keeping the 
money his wife has lost and giving her ber 
own arguments Of "finders keepers." 

Kitty Flynn rendered several songs in 
syncopated style and went over big. Her 
two colored songs, at which she seems to 
be more proficient, were the best liked. 

Miss Flynn has personality , as well as 
voice and possesses the knack' of putting 
over her numbers. 
_ The Hippodrome Four, In closing posi- 
tion, made a lot of noise but did nothing 
remarkable. The act runs too long, as 
neither the comedy nor the songs could 
justify the time they lingered on the stage. 

The turn is of the school room type and 
is entitled "In Dingle Spiel's Night School." 
The Jewish comedian is the cut-up of the 
quartette and managed to elicit a few 
laughs. S. W. 



TO AUCTION KLEIN ESTATE 

"Sunny Bill Manor," the country estate 
of the late Charles Klein, is to be sold 
at auction. It is situated at Rowayton, 
Connecticut and was built at an expense 
of $100,000. The sale takes place Satur- 
day on the premises. 



DREW CO. BACK IN NEW YORK 

John Drew and the players who appeared 
with, him on tour in "Major Pendennis" 
are back in New York, having completed 
their tour. 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 



AT B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE THIS WEEK 

ANDREW TOMBES 

FEATURED COMEDIAN IN 

"The Bride Shop" 

Direction— ROLFE and MADDOCK 



Good Looking Young Chorus Girls Who Can Sing 



STAR AND GARTER SHOW 

Address: I. M. WEINGARDEN, 19 West 20th Street, Chicago, 111. 
NO PLEASURE-SEEKERS NEED APPLY 



Good Looking Young Chorus Girls Who Can Sing 



September Morning Glories 

Address: JOS. W. CARLYLE, 19 West 20th Street, Chicago, 111. 
NO PLEASURE-SEEKERS NEED APPLY 



CHAS. H- WALDRON'S 

Bostonian Burlesquers 

WANTED— CHORUS GIRLS 

• OF MEDIUM SIZE 

Aiiunnce of Good Long Season 
No. 1 Wheel 

Apply to F. S» PIERCE, Room 803, Col. Theatre Bid*., 47th St. £ 7th Are., N. Y. 



ALAMAC THEATRICAL HOTEL 

I Formerly the New R«iml 

JOS. T. WEISMAN, Proprietor. 

Northwest Corner 14th & Chestnut Sts., St. Louis, Mo. 

Theatrical Hostelry, Caie and Cabaret 
Union Help (Member N. V. A. and Burlesque Club) Best Bet on the Circuit 



Tenne/ 



The vaudeville writer of vaudeville's best acts, sketches and mono- 
logues. If you owe yourself a good act, better let me write it for 
you now. 
ALLEN SPENCER TENNEY, 1493 Broadway, N ew York. 

WANTED--MAN FOR LEADS 

Also t asdtsjg Women. Must have Modern Wardrobe and be able to deliver the Goods. State 
age. height, vteight. Name lowest summer salary. Fay own. Week stands. SWAFFORD 
PAVILION THEATRE, Laconla, N. H. 



Manlcnrlog, Dalr Dressing. Scalp Treatment, Seals 

puolng. Toilet Preparations, Boadelr Novelties. 

"LA XABBB" SHOP 

1481 Brasdwiy. Roam 701 (9 a. m. to « p. m.) 

Special atten Uop g reen members of 

Phone Bryant 307 



BIG.BUNCH OF MATERIAL— 25c 

Monologues, Parodies, Gags, etc LARRY 
POWERS. Sharpeburg Sta., Pittsburgh. Pa. 



SNAKES S2 



Ball and King Snake*. 

Snakes, etc. Monkeys. 
Mecaire, Cocketooe, also Talking Parrots, S5.00 op. 
Blnls every Variety. Does, etc. HOPE'S PET 
SHOP. Sept. C, so N. 9th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



HALF SHEETS 

21I2S. Mack on yellow. 50 S7. 50. Heralds and 
Tonfehters our specialty. HTJHD OF 8HABPS- 
BURG IN IOWA, DEPT. C. 



THE LEADER OF THE WHEEL 

DAVE M ARION'S OWN CO. 

WANTED 

for the biggest production ever presented in Burlesque 

Novelties of Every Description^ 

Also Chorus Girls and Chorus Boys. 
ADDRESS 

DAVE MARION, Room 803, Columbia Theatre Bldg., New York 



GEO. W. 



JENNIE 



MILTON I DELMAR 

Comedian, singer, dancer. Irish, Rube, Tramp. MISS DELMAR: Ingenue, 
phenomenal contralto. Both experienced in Burlesque or Musical Comedy. 
BOX OFFICE ATTRACTIONS. Address care of N. Y. CLIPPER. 
P. S. — Have some peppery musical numbers (original), also several SCRIPTS 
and BITS. 



Wanted: Chorus Girls, Comedians 

and people in all lines for musical comedies. Must be first class. State all in 
first letter. Steady engagement. A. C. LANOAN and VICTOR A. NULTY, 
Hippodrome Theatre, Dallas, Texas. 



CLIMBING 

er of tuccesi In vaudeville I* 
you use the up-to-date comedy 



the 

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material from 

THE NEW No. 2 

McNALLY'S BULLETIN 

Everything New, Bright and Original 

PRICE, $1.00 

XcHAXLT'S BULLETIN MO. t contains 17 
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9 ROARING ACTS FOR HALE AND FE- 
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22 SURE FIRE PARODIES. 

A COMEDY SKETCH, entitled "ANXIOUS 
TO GET RICH." 

6 MINSTREL FIRST-PARTS, ending with a 
screaming FINALS. 

A TABLOID COMEDY AND BURLESQUE, 
also hundreds of Cross-Fire Gags and Jokes. 
Remember the price of McNALLY'S BUL- 
LETIN No. 2 Is only ONE DOLLAR per 
copy, with money-back; guarantee. 

WM. McNALLY, 81 E 125th St, New York 




SNEDEKER WANTS QUICK 

For two bills a week, permanent stock Iriiliu 
woman to feature, must be under thirty sod ml 
over 3 ft. 8 height. Leading man to direct sj 
blUa. Tickets anywhere If I know vou. Otbtr 
real people communicate. State all wltb ptmi 
quick. 8NEEEKEE, Bt. Anthony, Idaho. 0|k« 
Pocatello, Idaho, June 2Gtb. 

Telephone (Sft Bryant 

TRUNKS REPAIRED K3 

US West 41st St.. Corner itn Ave. 
Formerly with Quick service 

Taylor Trunk Works Returned in 24 hoon 

WHITE RAT TRANSFER CO., it 

EXriESS ass Mccacr, sasjsas sistsgs at Us sm 
147 Wast 37th Street, New York 



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IONA JACOBS 



273 W Mth St. 



New York OB 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 




TRIANGLE HELPING SENNETT 
GET PLAC E WITH PARAMOUNT 

Report Out That H. O. Davis Is Striving to Unscramble Director's 

Connections with Former's Company; Ince Definitely 

Out Without Any Unpleasantness 



Mack Sennett'a film artists came flock- 
ing into town last week, coincidental with 
Mr. Sennett'a negotiations to get out of 
Triangle and into a new connection. 
Mabel Normand, star of "Mickey," which 
originally was filmed upon 200,000 feet of 
otherwise perfectly good celluloid, and 
which now has been cut down to eighteen 
reels, was the latest notable to arrive. 

For several days it was gossiped about 
that the Keystone cops were on hand to 
atom the office of H. O. Davis, general 
manager of Triangle, and make him do 
the right thing by Mack. 

Inside information from the conferences 
of the chief characters in the Sennett- 
Triangle drama, a type of play with 
which Sennett is not familiar, reached 
The Clipper to the effect that Mr. Davis 
has been working heroically to get Sen- 
nett extricated from his Triangle en- 
tanglements. This inside rumor, from 
sources remote from either Sennett or 
Davis, but authentic just the same, testi- 
fies that Mr. Davis is further working to 
help Sennett get a job with the Para- 
mount. 

The principal difficulty is said to be 
tbat of unscrambling Sennett's financial 
affaire. It is declared that the Keystone 
company, hitherto directed by Sennett, 
owes Kessel & Bauman $500,000. Even 
if Davis wanted to retain the Keystone 
and Sennett's future producing services, 
lie would have to liquidate that $500,000 
first. 



In the withdrawal of Thomas H. Ince, 
whose relations with Triangle were simi- 
lar to those of Sennett, announced last 
week, it was officially revealed that Mr. 
Davis has promulgated a definite policy 
against dealing in any way shape or form 
with a subsidiary company, hereafter. 
The subsidiaries are declared to have been 
the undoing of Triangle. Henceforth, the 
producing organizations will be owned, 
controlled and directed by Triangle, with- 
out any intermediary influences. 

It was confidently expected that before 
this week passed, Sennett, with the help- 
ing hand of Davis, will have gotten out 
of Triangle, and will have procured an 
engagement from Paramount. 

Mabel Normand's coming to town is 
said to have included the settling of a 
little difficulty with the Goldwyn Pic- 
tures Corporation. Much to the surprise 
of everyone outside of Miss Normand and 
Goldwyn, it developed last week that 
Goldwyn possessed BOme sort of option 
on her services. In some quarters it was 
said that the firm star, following a period 
of discontent over her connections with 
the Mabel Normand company managed 
by Sennett, had signed a contract with 
Goldwyn. Now, it is declared, she is seek- 
ing to abrogate this or whatever other 
obligation she is alleged to have with 
Goldwyn. It is said her future hopes lie 
in the direction of appearing under Sen- 
nett's direction, wherever he happens to 
be connected. 



PARAMOUNT ANNOUNCES PLAYS 

With the departure for California of 
Jesse L. Leaky, in charge of production 
of Famous Playera-Laaky pictures, an- 
nouncement is made this week of the 
photoplays in course of making or com- 
pleted and to be released through Para- 
mount during the late 'summer and early 
autumn months under its new "star 
series" selective booking plan. 

Thirteen of the foremost and most 
popular stars on the screen comprise the 
stellar list, namely, Madame Petrova, 
Marguerite Clark, Pauline Frederick, Bil- 
lie Burke, Julian Eltinge, Fannie Ward, 
Jack Pickford, Louise Huff, Vivian Mar- 
tin, Sessue Hayakawa, George Beban, Wal- 
lace Reid and Ann Pennington. These 
stars alone would be potent enough to 
make a complete ■ success of the produc- 
tions in which they appear, but, in its 
determination to do everything in its 
power to set an example in the procuring 
of better photoplays, the Famous Play- 
ers-Lasky Company has enlisted the serv- 
ices of, or obtained the rights to the writ- 
ings of many of the greatest authors and 
playwrights of the past and present. 



VITAGRAPH ELECTS OFFICERS 

Albert E. Smith was re-elected presi- 
dent and treasurer of the Vitagraph Com- 
pany of America, at a meeting held last 
week. Commodore J. Stuart Blackton 
wag re-elected vice-president and secre- 
tary. Former Postmaster-General Frank 
H. Hitchcock was elected chairman of 
the Board of Directors and General Coun- 
sel of the company. Prior to* the election 
of officers a meeting of stockholders was 
held, at which those selected as directors 
were Albert E. Smith, J. Stuart Black- 
ton, Walter W. Irwin, Clendennin J. 
Ryan, H. H. Vreeland and Frank H. 
Hitchcock. 

Immediately following the election 
Messrs. Smith and Blackton were re- 
elected by the unanimous vote of the 
board. 



WINS POINT IN FOX SUIT 

Louis T. Rogers, former contract man 
of the Fox Film Corporation, won a point 
in bis suit against, that company when, 
according to a decision of the Appellate 
Division of the Supreme Court last week, 
he need not submit to an examination by 
defendant's attorneys before trial. Rogers 
is suing the company for $1,800 for sal- 
ary alleged to be due him for extra work 
he did as manager of the Canadian de- 
partment of the Fox Film Corporation. 



TOBIAS GETS "SUNSHINE" RIGHTS 

M. T. Tobias returned from Chicago 
this week, having completed arrangements 
whereby he will control the state rights 
sale for the United States and Canada of 
ten snperproductions to be made in the 
West by the Sunshine Film Corporation, 
of Chicago. These productions will be 
seven-reelers, in which wellknown stars 
"ill be featured. The first will be ready 
for release about September 15. 



HOWARD UNDERGOES OPERATION 

George Bronson Howard of the Fox Film 
Corporation was operated upon last Satur- 
day at his home in West Eighty-sixth 
street, for the removal of an abscess in the 
left aide. His picture "Come Through" 
opened Sunday night at the Broadway 
Theatre. 



TRIGGER GETS NEW THEATRE 

Samuel H. Trigger has obtained a long 
fcaae on the Park Theatre, Corona, L. I., 
making the fourth theatre in which he is 
interested. The house, which has a seat- 
ng capacity of 600, will open July 1 with 
Harold W. Rosenthal as manager. 



LOUIS J. ARMS JOINS GOLDWYN 

I Louis J. Arms has been engaged to take 
charge of the editorial offices of the Gold- 
*Jn Pictures Corporation. 



METRO SHIFTS 

ITS DIRECTORS 

AND STARS 

QUALITY STUDIO ACTIVE 



TRIANGLE PLAYS ANNOUNCED 

Dorothy Dalton and BesBie Barriscale 
are the stars of the Triangle plays to be 
released July 1. "The Flame of the 
Yukon" is the title of the drama in which 
Dorothy Dalton will make her ninth stel- 
lar appearance. It was written by Monte 
M. Katterjohn, directed by Charles Miller 
and photographed by Clyde De Vinna. 

Bessie Barriscale will be seen in a com- 
edy of the eternal feminine from the pen 
of C. Gardner Sullivan, known as "Hater 
of Men." Charles Miller also directed this 
production. 

ROSENGARTEN GETS FRANCHISE 

Leo Rosengnrten, president of the Herald 
Film Corporation, has secured the first 
States Right franchise from the Superla- 
tive Film Corporation. The latter organi- 
zation will release six pictures made by the 
Irving Cnmmings Pictures, Inc., and the 
some number produced by the Lois Mere- 
dith Pictures, Inc. Rosengarten has pur- 
chased the rights of these pictures for all 
of New York State and northern New 
Jersey. 



The Metro Pictures Corporation an- 
nounced last week a sweeping shift of 
its directors and players from one studio 
to another. 

Maxwell Karger has been placed in 
charge of the Quality studio. Dave 
Thompson will be his assistant. The first 
picture to be produced by them will be 
"A Sleep Memory" the famous story by 
K. Phillips Oppenheim, which was pictur- 
ized by Albert Shelby Le Vino. William 
H. Stevens will lie technical director. 

Francis X. Bushman and Beverly Bayne 
will soon be shifted to the Quality studio 
for the making of forthcoming produc- 
tions. Edwin Carewe will be their di- 
rector. 

Miss Stevens, who was the first star 
selected for the Metro special productions, 
is still working in "The Slacker" which, 
it is reported, will soon be completed and; 
released. 



MISS DALTON AT WORK AGAIN 

Dorothy Dalton returned to Culver City 
this week, from Chicago, where she has 
been spending several days with her par- 
ents. Miss Dalton stopped in Portland, 
Ore., on the way back to the Culver City 
studios, and appeared at ttie Movie Ball 
of the Exhibitors League of Oregon. She 
also appeared before large audiences at 
the Liberty Theatre in Seattle and the Por- 
tola Theatre in San Francisco. Her next 
Triangle release will be "The Flame of the 
Yukon." 



THRILLING PROLOGUE OFFERED 

In what might be called the prologue to 
the latest Triangle drama, "Paws of the 
Bear," by J. G. Hawks, in which William 
Desmond is starred, a glimpse of the Bel- 
gian frontier is given, where the Uhlans 
are brought sharply into conflict with the 
allies. There are scenes of startling actu- 
ality, with the explosion of big guns and 
the circling of aeroplanes. And yet this 
is not a war story. 



FILM IS MURDER EVIDENCE 

San Francisco, June 13. — A motion pic- 
ture taken here last July three minutes af- 
ter a bomb explosion, which was respon- 
sible for the death of ten persons,' was of- 
fered ns evidence by the prosecution to- 
day in the trial of Mrs. Rena Mooney for 
murder, growing out of (he explosion. 



MISS STEVENS IS DE LUXE STAR 

Emily StevenB will be the star in "A 
Sleeping Memory," the first of the special 
productions de luxe to be released by 
Metro Picture* Corporation, which has 
been adapted for the screen by Albert 
Shelby Le Vino, from E. Phillips Oppen- 
heim's popular novel. 



SELZNICK JOINS ASSOCIATION 

Lewis J. Selznick last week became a 
member of the National Association of the 
Motion Picture Industry. 



CLUB TO DINE ROTHAPFEL 

Samuel L. Rothapfel. of the Rlalto. will 
be the guent of honor at a dinner and en- 
tertainment to be given by the Screen 
Club June 30. 



CAMERAGRAPH PRESIDENT WEDS 

Frank R. Abrams, president and general 
manager of the Cameragraph Film Mfg. 
Co., Inc., was married last week to Ethel 
Levey, non-professional. Mr. and Mrs. 
Abrams have left for the South and will 
be away several weeks. 



NETTER OPENS NEW OFFICES 

Leon D. Netter, head of the Master- 
piece Film Attractions, announces the open- 
ing of his new offices at 404 Sincere Build- 
ing, Cleveland, O., from which he will op- 
erate through the Ohio territory. 



SUPERLATIVE GETS DAVENPORT 

Arthur Blumenkrohn, business manager 
for the Superlative Pictures Corp., was in 
New York last week and engaged Harry 
Davenport to direct Irving Cummin gs in 
his first release. 




WILLIAM A. BRADY, 
Director- General 

WORLD-PICTURES 



Present 



ALICE BRADY 
"THE DIVORCE gAmE" 

Directed by TRA VERS VALE. 

From the Famous Play, "Mile. Fifi" by Leo DHrichatein 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 



" — - 


Chart No- 6 June 20, 1917 

A REVIEW OF REVIEWS 

FROM TRADE CRITICISMS 

Compiled by The New York Clipper 

Cut out this chart and paste in scrap book for reference. 


1 


Nam* of Film 


CUPPER 


WORLD 


NEWS 


TELEGRAPH 


TRADE REVIEW 


"GOLDEN LOTUS" 

Modem drama — Brady- 
International. Released 
Jane 25. Five reels. 
Featuring Regina Badet. 
Director: Louis Mercan- 
ton. 


"A worthy screen of- 
fering — Intensely inter- 
esting at all times." 


"Is typically French, 
bnt it has an excellent 
moral. — Plot is well put 
together." 

(Issue June 30.) 


"A skillfully com- 
piled melodrama. — Sus- 
pense and excitement are 
aroused at every turn 
taken by the story." 


"This picture, with its 
singularly fine equipment, 
bears all the earmarks of 
success." 

(Issue June 17.) 


"A melodrama of more 
than ordinary strength. 
Its romantic interest 
never slackens." 

(Issue June 23.) 


2 


"HEIR OF THE AGES" 

Drama — Pallas-Para- 
mount. Five reels. Re- 
leased June 25. Featur- 
ing House Peters. Di- 
rector: E. J. Le Saint. 


"A virile story well 
told. A markedly strong 
feature." 


"A fair picture. — Has 
suspense and many 
pretty scenes." 

(Issue June 30.) 


"Every inch of the 
film is worth while. We 
regard this as a far bet- 
ter than average offering 
from Paramount." 
(Issue June 30.) 


"A novelty in films 
principally by reason of 
its prologue." 

(Issne Jnne 17.) 


"Barring the fact that 
it is slow-footed, the 
play is one that may be 
successfully offered to 
the casual audience." 
(Issue June 23.) 


3 


"HER STRANGE WED- 
DING" 

Modern Drama — Lasky- 
Paramount. Five reels. 
Released June 25. Star- 
ring Fannie Ward. Di- 
rector : George Melford. 


"Gripping in its in- 
tensity. The story un- 
folds in a most natural 
and interesting manner." 


"A good Interesting 
picture full of suspense 
and a sense of newness." 
(Issue June 30.) 


"The story is most re- 
markable. — The dramatic 
development is rapid and 
consecutive. — An unusu- 
ally good picture." 
(Issue Jnne 30.) 


"The sets are lavish, 
and the photography is 
excellent and it is only a 
pity that the structure of 
the story is faulty." , 
(Issue June 17.) 


(Review not published 
to date.) 

(Issne Jane 23.) 


4 


"PAWS OF THE 
BEAR" 

War Drama — Kay-Bee. 
Five reels. Released 
June 17. Featuring Win. 
Desmond. Director: 
Reginald Barker. 


"The story is well told. 
■ A picture of more than 
.ordinary merit." 


"A genuine screen 
story. — Holding interest 
closely from beginning to 
end." 

(Issue June 30.) 


(Review not published 
to date. Issue June 30.) 


"Never gets anywhere 

near to being a true-to-life 

story. The action of the 

film is fairly inventive." 

(Issue June 17.) 


(Review not published 
to date.) 

(Issue June 23.) 


5 


"THE MAELSTROM" 

Modern Drama — Vita- 
graph. Five reels. Re- 
leased June 18. Featur- 
ing Earl Williams and 
Dorothy Kelly. Director: 
Paul Scardon. 


"Goes at a rapid pace. 
Commands interest 

throughout." 


"Not in any way out 
of the ordinary. Leans 
to old methods of picture 
making rather than 
new." 

(Issue June 30.) 


"Old favorites make 
the leading roles par- 
ticularly enjoyable. Can 
be accepted as a very 
high grade picture in its 
class." 

(Issue June 30.) 


"A good, old-fashioned 
melodrama. Has a punch 
and plenty of thrills in 
every reel." 

(Issue June 17.) 


"A . gripping detective 
story; full of thrills and 
action." 

(Issue June 23.) 


6 


"HOUSE OF CARDS" 

Modern Drama — Art 
Dramas. Five reels. Re- 
leased June 25. Featur- 
ing Catherine Calvert and 
Frank Mills. Director : 
Mme. Blache. 


"A thoroughly good 
film. Full of heart inter- 
est. There are few who 
can resist its appeal." 


"Mostly on the strength 
of never failing "kid 
stuff" will get over." 
(Issue June 30.) 


"The merit of the pic- 
ture lies chiefly in the 
wealth of kid stuff intro- 
duced. The story itself 
is really slight" 

(Issue June 30.) 


(Review not published 
to date.) 

(Issue June 17.) 


"May claim originality 
of design if not of mate- 
rial. Does not come np 
to the standard of a fair 
program offering." 
(Issue June 23.) 


7 


"WHO'S YOUR 
NEIGHBOR?" 

Melodrama — Master 
Drama Features. Seven 
reels. State Rights. Di- 
rector : S. Rankin Drew. 


"A gripping story. 
One of the big features 
of the day." 


"One of the most in- 
sidious moral-destroying 
pictures ever produced. 
The fact that the picture 
is well produced makes 
it even more harmful." 
(Issue Jnne 30.) 


"Offers the most pow- 
erful argument we have 
seen in pictures this 
year, but offers it as 
'genuine entertainment. 
It is bold, clear tremend- 
ous." 

(Issue June 30.) 


"The subject is one 

that is calculated to 

bring a blush to any 

bashful maiden's cheek." 

(issue June 17.) 


"The story is interest- 
ing and leads gradually 
to a strong and power- 
ful climax. A subject for 
adult audiences only." 
(Issue June 23.) 


8 


"THE LITTLE 
ORPHAN" 

, Drama — Bluebird. 
Five reels. Featuring 
Ella Hall. Director : 
Jack Conway. 


"An entertaining and 
interesting picture." 


"There is plenty of 
comedy in the picture 
and a love motive." 
(Issue June 30.) 


"One of those intimate 
'personal' stories which 
amuse but do not leave 
a strong impression." 


"Produced in good 
taste but is rather mild 

and undramatic." 
(Issue June 17.) 


(Review not published 
to date.) 

(Issue June 23.) 




June 20, 



1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



WAR TO ENRICH 

FILM INDUSTRY 

SAYSO^HARA 

SEES STATE RIGHTS GAIN 



Unlimited wealth will pour into the 
film industry as a direct result of this 
country's participation in the war, ac- 
cording to Barratt O'Hara, former Lieu- 
tenant Governor of Illinois. Mr. O'Hara 
arrived in this city last week from Chi- 
cago with information gained from sev- 
eral trips over this country and into 
Canada. 

He is head of the Arizona Film Co. of 
Chicago, producers of the films "The Lit- 
tle Girl Next Door" and "Should She 
Obey?" Mr. O'Hara disposed of the na- 
tional rights to the latter film to Akiba 
Weinberg of the Renowned Pictures Cor- 
poration, 1600 Broadway. 

The splendid prospect of success for 
makers and distributors and exhibitors 
of films in general, and for State rights 
operators in particular was the dominant 
note of Mr. O'Hara's report of what he 
had observed. 

"The film industry is sure to enjoy tre- 
mendous prosperity during the period of 
the war," he said. "All signs point in 
that direction. The public, seeking re- 
laxation from the serious, melancholy 
thoughts of the world conflict, is turning 
its full interest upon pictures. The 
screen is the stabilizer of the people's 
nerves. 

"As a result of this widespread growth 
of patronage toward films, better pictures 
will be made, better distribution will be 
established and waste will be wiped out." 

Mr. O'Hara's remarks bore significantly 
upon the reorganization of several big 
producing and distributing companies at 
this time. 

1 don't know how conditions will ad- 
just themselves after the war ends," he 
continued, "but I know that while it 
lasts the motion picture business will 
reap a big harvest. It only remains for 
those engaged in any branch of the in- 
dustry to grasp the opportunities at 
hand." 

Mr. O'Hara is an interesting example 
of the recruit to film production from 
other fields. Three years ago he was a 
public official immersed in a great cam- 
paign against vice. His legislative cru- 
sade against the white slave evil reached 
nationwide importance. 

He toured the country making speeches 
and forming committees. 

"I found out soon," says Mr. O'Hara, 
"that I could kQl myself easily trying to 
tell the world with my own voice and 
railroad fare the things I wanted it to 
know, and that I wouldn't get far. Mo- 
. tion pictures offered the solution. The 
screen could take the message to millions. 

He thereupon formed the Arizona Film 
Corp. and produced "The Little Girl Next 
Door," which treated the morality ques- 
tion. This was a big success. His next 
picture "Should She Obey?" which dis- 
cusses the divorce evil in a powerful way, 
has created a record at the La Salle The- 
atre, Chicago. The film played to ca- 
pacity for many days in opposition to 
Ethel Barrymore, Douglas Fairbanks and 
"The Crisis" at other theatres. 

The Renowned Pictures Corporation 
will shortly put the picture on for a run 
in New York. 



HALL SELLS "BAR SINISTER" 

Frank Hall has disposed of "The Bar 
Sinister" for the following territory: New 
Jork State to M. H. Hoffman, for the 
Foursquare Pictures, Inc.; New Jersey to 
uje Civilization Film Corp., Newark ; New 
England to the American Feature Film 
Co., Boston, and California, Arizona, Ne- 
vada and the Hawaiian Islands to Nat. A. 
Magner, San Francisco. Australia, New 
Zealand and the adjacent islands in the 
jfrcifie. including Java, have been bought 
«T the Australasian Film Co., while the 
J. R. Nerlein Co., Ltd.. of Christiania, Nor- 
*«y, has obtained the rights for Scan- 
dinavia. 



GOLDWYN ELECTS OFFICERS 

The Goldwyn Distributing Corporation, 
recently chartered at Albany to handle the 
Goldwyn Picture releases throughout the 
United States, held its first meeting last 
week and the following officers were 
elected : Samuel Goldfish, president ; Archi- 
bald Selwyn, vice-president; Alfred Weiss, 
vice-president; F. B. Warren, vice-presi- 
dent, and Gabriel L. Hess, treasurer. 



1LIODOR CAST IS COMPLETE 

Herbert Brenon has almost completed 
the cast for his state rights picture, "The 
Fall of the Romanoffs," featuring Ilio- 
dor, the "mad monk." The cast includes 
Edward Connelly as Rasputin, Nance 
O'Neil as the Czarina, Alfred Hickman 
as the Czar, Ekaterina Gulauta as Anna, 
Conway Tearle as the Young Prince and 
William E. Shay as the head monk. 



MISS TALMADGE HAVING FUN 

Constance Talmadge is having an out- 
and-out vacation time in making her first 
Selznick-Picture. This latest and young- 
est of the Selznick group of stars is al- 
ready nearly finished with the production 
of ''The Lesson," a photodrama based 
upon a story by Virginia Terhune Van De 
Water, and she says it has been more like 
play than work. 

LOIS MEREDITH STORY CHOSEN 

Lois Meredith will shortly begin work 
on "The Voice from the Mist," the first of 
her starring vehicles to be released by the 
Superlative Pictures Corp. The story was 
written by Winifred Dunn. William Rob- 
ert Coleman will direct the picture and 
Marcel Morhange will be technical di- 
rector. 



MESSER BUYS FILM FOR JERSEY 

Newark, N. J., June 18. — A. L. Messer 
lias purchased the New Jersey rights for 
the latest A. H. Jacobs Photoplays, Inc., 
production, Jane Grey in "Her Fighting 
Chance." He will book New Jersey ter- 
ritory through his exchange in the Proctor 
Theatre Building. 



EXTRA PLAYERS OBJECT 

Extra players are again up in arms 
over the recrudescence of the society act- 
ors. This development centers about the 
engagement through The Globe Agency, 
which procures film jobs for extras, of 
fifty society women, mostly from New- 
port, to act as extras and turn their 
earnings over to the Red Cross. 

The society extras are under the lead- 
ership of Airs. Lida Hilton, wife of a 
well-known Newport physician. The en- 
gagement of these extras has several ad- 
vantages for the film companies. The 
presence of the society persons in the 
film, for one thing, is regarded as giving 
added interest to it. It also is under- 
stood the extras themselves are anxious 
to rent the finish products, showing their 
talents, for private exhibition at their 
Newport villas. 



FAIRBANKS SIGNS EILEEN PERCY 
Eileen Percy, who makes her motion 
picture debut in the Douglas Fairbanks- 
Artcraft picture "Wild and Wooly," has 
been signed as permanent leading lady for 
Fairbanks. She will appear opposite him 
in all bis productions during the coming 
year. 



COTTON ENGAGED BY GOLDWYN 

William H. Cotton has been engaged by 
the Goldwyn Pictures as art director and 
at the studios has already begun work on 
the first Jane Cowl production, which is 
being filmed under the direction of Arthur 
Hopkins. 



SEMON ORGANIZING NEW COMPANY 

Lawrence Semon, comedy director of 
the Greater Vitagraph, is organizing a new 
company for the production of Big V 
comedies, and of his old company Joseph 
Simberg and Earl Montgomery are the only 
players retained. Among the new people 
engaged are seven top-notch acrobats. 



ART DRAMAS GETS "THE PEDDLER" 

Although the U. S. Amusement Cor- 
liomtion's production of "The Peddler," 
with .Tee Welsh in the leading role, was 
originally intended to be a special for in- 
dependent release, universal demand from 
exhibitors using the program has caused 
the producers to announce it as a regular 
Art Dramas feature. 



"PARENTAGE" BOOKED AT RIALTO 

"Parentage." Honnrt Henley's "thought 
film of real life," lias been booked by Man- 
ager Rothanfel for the week of July 8 at 
the Itinlto. The following week it will 
be shown at the Colonial. Chicago. 



The State Hidrits' Seiasatiort 

Tkat Will MaRe You, a Fortune 




HERBERT BRENOH 



Pjres-ew.tiS' 



of Ike 



THE FALL 
ROMANOFFS 



WitK 




The FamecfMael MonK"oi Russia 
aHdajiall-Siarcast inch uri ltd 

\ and a score of others 



r 



Herbert Brenon's Screen Masterpiece 
Tells the Amazing Story of Rasputin 
and the Russian Court, of Social and 
Religious Intrigues and of a Nation's 
Dramatic Stroke for Liberty. 



Personally directed by HERBERT BRENON 



ILIODOR PICTURE CORPORATION 



729 7th Avenue, New York City 
Telephone: Bryant 7340 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 20, 1917 



"PARENTAGE" 

State Sights. Frank Seng. 
Cast. 

John Brown William Welsh 

Mrs. Brawn Ann Lehr 

Robert Smith Bert Buthby 

Mrs. Smith. '. Mary Grey 

Horace Brown Matter Matty Roubert 

Horace Brown Gilbert Rooney 

Robert Smith, Jr Frank Goyette 

Agnes Melton Alois Alexander 

Agnes Melton Barbara Cast let on 

Samuel Melton W. De Shield* 

Mrs. Melton Alice Wilson 

Aim 
Robert Smith, Jr Hobart Henley 

Stoiy— Written by Martin C. Chandler 
and Hobart Henley. Directed by Ho- 
bart Henley. 

Remarks. 

In "Parentage," Frank Seng is offering 
a real picture, with a real purpose and a 
very real punch. It is a blending and 
crystallization of the very essence of 
human emotions. Homely truths ot every- 
day life have been assembled and drama- 
tized in a manner that gives them new 
significance, while sparks of humor are 
struck at the right moments to relieve the 
strain of pathos. Commonplace incidents 
have been idealized and pictured according 
to their value; either humorously pathetic 
or pathetically humorous. _ . 

There is only one spot, occurring at 
the end of the last reel, where fault may 
be found in the construction of the picture. 
Here the producers break the continuity 
of the story too abruptly in order to pro- 
duce a surprise climax and, while this does 
not detract materially from the general ex- 
cellence of the feature, it is of doubtful 
dramatic value, because it may create the 
impression that something has been cut 
out of the film. 

The picture is exceptionally well cast 
and excellently played. The direction is 
admirable and the settings and photography 
of the highest quality. 

The story in brief deals with prenatal 
influences, and the effects of borne environ- 
ment upon children. 

Brown and Smith, partners in business, 
are each informed that be is a prospective 
father. Brown is overjoyed at the news, 
while Smith considers the event in the 
nature of a calamity. In one home the 
baby is welcomed, while in the other it is 
accepted as an unwelcome guest. Later 
we see these two children give evidence of 
the effect of their early home life. Suc- 
cess and happiness come to one, while the 
other sinks in defeat. 

Box Office Value. 
Good for a special run- 




"MADCAP MADGE" 

Ince-Kay Bee. Five Reels. 

Released June 24 by Triangle. 

Cast. 

Madge Flower Olive Thomas 

Earl Denham Charles Ounn 

Julia Flower Dorcat Matthews 

Mrs. Flower Aggie Herring 

Charles Lunkin Jack Livingston 

Earl of Larlsdale J. Barney Sherry 

Mr. Flower J. Frank Burke 

Letitia Jane Adams Gertrude Claire 

Story — Comedy drama. Written by R. 

Cecil Smith. Directed by Raymond B. 

West. Featuring Olive Thomas. 
Actios — Interesting. 
Continuity— Consistent. 
Suspense— Sustained. 
Detail— Excellent. 
Atmosphere — O. K. 
Photography — Good. 

Remarks. 

A harum-scarum daughter of well-to-do 
parents is the central figure of this story. 

Banished from boarding school because 
of her pranks, she joins her parents and 
her sister. The latter is angling for an 
English Earl but is satisfied to land just 
an every day man. 

While the story is not new and has little 
depth, it is well told and its interest is 
greatly enhanced by the personality of 
Olive Thomas. 

Box Office Value. 

Full run. 



"TODAY" 

Produced by Harry Rapf . 

State Rights Release. 

Cast 

IAly Morton Florence Reed 

Fred Morton Frank Mills 

Henry Morton Gut Weinberg 

Emma Morton Alice Gale 

Marion Garland... Leonore Harris 

Richard Hewlett. Captain Harry Lamoardt 
Mrs. Farrington Kate Letter 

Story — From the big stage success by 
George Broadhurst and Abraham 
Schomer. Directed by Ralph Ince. 

Action—Rapid and smooth- 
Continuity-— Correct. 
Suspense — Very strong. 
Detail— Perfect. 
Atmosphere— Good. 
Photography — Fine. 

Remarks 

"Today" is one great big punch. Fine 
direction by Ralph Ince and a highly artis- 
tic performance by Florence Reed, not to 
mention flawless support by all others who 
contribute to the film, herein portray a 
simple, dramatic story with great intensity. 

The play is parallel in merit with the 
stage triumph of several seasons back. As 
to story, it differs from the stage version 
only in that the morbid element of a wife's 
transgressions and her murder by the 
husband, is converted into a dream, and 
a happy ending is thus provided. 

When the wife awakes, and it is shown 
that the foregoing has been a figment of 
her mind, her character is purified, and 
the audience leaves in a hopeful, bnpp.v 
mood. 

Box Office Value 

Worth long run: 



THE MAELSTROM" 

Vitagrapb. Five Reels. 

Released June 18 by V-L-8-B. 

Cast. 

Jimmie Hallet Earle Williams 

Peggy Greye-Stratton Dorothy Kelly 

Stewart Reader Ling Denton Vane 

Chief Meneies John Robertson 

Gwennie Lyne Julia Swayne Gordon 

Cincinnati Red Gordon Gray 

Dago Bam Bernard Beigel 

Sergeant Congreve Robert Gaillard 

Story — Mystery drama, picturized from 

the story by Frank Freest. Director, 

Paul Scardon. 
Action— Absorbing. 
Continuity — Well maintained. 
Suspense— Gripping. 
Detail— Correct. 
Atmosphere — Convincing. 
Photography — Good. 

Remarks. 

This film is full of mystery and adven- 
ture. "The Maelstrom" goes through its 
five reels at a rapid pace, and commands 
interest throughout. 

The story tells bow Jimmie Hallet, a 
millionaire, into whose hands a girl un- 
known to him thrusts a package bearing 
a name and address, becomes further en- 
meshed in a series of adventures, including 
a murder mystery. He falls in love with 
her, to find that she is the daughter of the 
murdered man. 

Earle Williams, as Jimmie Hallet, plays 
the role with engaging pleasantness. Doro- 
thy Kelly gave a capable portrayal of the 
girl, and the rest of the cast gave satis- 
faction. 

Box Office Value. 

Full run. 



"WHO'S YOUR NEIGHBOR" 

Master Drama Features, Inc. Seven Reels. 

State Rights Release'. 

Cast 

Hattie Fenshaw Christine Mayo 

Bryant M. Harding Anders Randolf 

Betty Hamlin Evelyn Brent 

Dudley Carlton Frank Morgan 

Hoik Harding Wm. Sherwood 

Mrs. Bowert .Gladys Fairbanks 

Diet. Atty. Osborne Frankly n Ha una 

Story — Melodramatic. Written by Wil- 

lard Mack. Adapted and directed by S. 

Rankin Drew. 
Action — Has strong interest. 
Continuity — Consistent throughout. 
Suspense — Gripping. 
Detail— Excellent- 
Atmosphere— Convincing. 
Photography— O. K. 

Remarks. 

In this film, we have what is probably 
the most intelligent and convincing plea 
for the segregation of the social evil that 
has ever been made. It points out with 
precision and directness the danger which 
is apt to confront our wives and daugh- 
ters from the making and enforcement of 
laws advocated by social reformers. It 
shows bow the fallen woman, driven from 
her haunts is likely to become the very 
next door neighbor of the well meaning 
but misinformed man or woman who has 
the impossible idea that the evil can be 
stamped out and a general reformation of 
the poor unfortunates thus attained. 

Willard Mack has written a gripping 
story. 

It is propaganda, it is true, but it is 
served up with such a human story that it 
proves a tower of strength for its mission. 
It is well acted throughout and S. Ran- 
kin Drew has directed it in a masterly 
fashion making it one of the big feature 
pictures of the day. 

Box Office Value. 

Good for full run. 



This b the Way "THE SUBMARINE 

EYE" Impressed the Daily 

Newspaper Critics 

EVE. MAIL — Artt&ed enUnBtssm. Easily the sw- 
um picture Dimity of the Bummer t*iinn 

ZIT, DC THE EVENING JOURNAL — 1/ you like 
thrills and beart- throbbing moments yon are gains to 
get tbejs In Iwnrtift I am going to ask yoa to go 

sod see U. 

EVENING WORLD — On of the most thrilling spec- 
tacles shown In motion Dletora. Banks with the 
gaper-fesrares prenocsly played at the Liberty. 

TRIBUNE — This on submarine story Is to far 
ahead of anything which has gooe before it that 
then Is no comparison. 

N. T. TOSS — A thrilling sea tale. An lnterest- 
entnpeTrhTg picture. Beautiful photography to recom- 
mend 1L 

N. T. WORLD — This new sub- 
marine photoplay may be ranked 
among the beat pictures yet pro- 
duced . . . Certainly well worth 
seeing. 

N. T. AMERICAN— As full of 
glamor SS "Treasure Island." 
Clever, nnnsoal. Intensely Interest- 
Jog. 

EVENING SUN — OmMnfli nry 
happily entertainment and lnstroc- 
ttOO Of a unique Tariety. 

BOB REEL, CHICAGO AMER- 
ICAN — Goes one better toss 
"20.000 Leagues'' — It's a Dsrc- 
6Vm Thriller. 

MAE TUiEE. CHICAGO TRIB- 
UNE— If yon are not fascinated I 
nosa ny cms — an intrica te piece 
of work beautifully done. 

W. K. HOLLANDER. CHICAGO 
DAILY NEWS — Romantic Wending 
of Stevenson and Verne — Photog- 
raphy a Joy. 

KXTTT KELLT. CHICAGO EX- 
AMINER — A rejuLu- frown-up fairy 
tale— virmlj recommended for a 
refreshing two boors. 



ITS NOW OR NEVER 

STATE RIGHTS BUYERS - 

YOU OUGHT TO REALIZE 
THAT NOW IS THE OPPORTUNE 
TIME TO MAKE MONEY WITH 

^UBiupiH^ 



FOURTH WEEK ATT+HE 
LIBERTY THEATRE 

NEW yonrt- CITY 

NOW PLAYING AT THE 

STUDE BAKER THEATRE 
CHICAGO 

READ/THINK/ ACT/ 



And Here U the UNANIMOUS 

Praise-Verdict of the Trade 

Press Reviewers 

EXHIBITOR'S TRADE REVIEW — Undoubtedly rlfftls 
many of the present day output In its tease dramatic 
action and veil defined thrills. Will receire hearty 
support. Exhibitors vol Sod It ft meritorious release. 

N. T. CLIPPER — Action — plentiful. Continuity — 
excellent. Suspense — Intense, Detail — superb. At- 
m esphere- — excellent Photography — magnificent Box 
office nine — toe full run. 

BILLRQABD — Without ft flaw; It crips and thrills. 
It pleases and satisfies. It should prove a box-cftVe 
Basnet of the highest calibre. Exhibitors who fall 
to boos it are not playing fair with theiBselrai or 
their patrons. 

MOTOGBAPHT— Has about all that is required to 
keep Us a n dj eoces In a perpetually interested state. 
It ought to cake a great state rights proposition. 

VARIETY — Very effect! rely Tisnal- 
ized. Certain to attract Interest no 
matter in what part of the world it 
Is shown. 

JOSEPH L. KELLEY IN MOTION 
PICTURE NEWS — Its artioo Is -strong 
but sUnpl* — Impress! re wlthnrt the 
"blare of trumpets." Its continuity 
reaches the nth power of perfection. 
Doll moments are conspicuous because 
of their absence. 

N. Y. DRAMATIC NEWS— Held 
audience- completely under its spell. 

ADAH HULL SHIRK IN N. T. 

DRAMATIC MJJZBOS— The story is 
plsiatblo sod extremely thrilling. 
WHI eonstitnte one of the most profit- 
able state right pictures that nubefn 
produced in ft Ions time. 

N. Y. TELEGRAPH— These YiSsTos 
of the picture. Industry tare produced 
the eighth wonder or the world . . . 
Timely, s> big drawing card, a genuine 
Botelty in theme sad photography. 

EXHIBITORS' HERALD — A seletf- 
tUSe, entertaining moo ey- making hit. 

N. T. REVIEW- — The story is one 
of the most fascinating and dramatic 
erer cooedTed, and is deTeloped with 
ft keen eye to "»+» <w 1nt the rrapecse. 



WILLIAMSON BROTHERS 

Executive Offices, Longacre Building, New York City 



June 20, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



JOHN BRUNTON STUDIOS 

Productions of Every Description 

For Public, Private, Professional and Non-Professional Performances 

SCENERY, PROPERTIES, STAGE FURNISHINGS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Telephone: Bryant 5914 226 WEST 41ST STREET, NEW YORK 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Books for home 
amusement, Negro Plays, Paper, Scenery, Mrs. Jarley't Wax 
Works. Catalogue Free I Free! Free! 

SAMUEL FRENCH, 2S West Ssth St. New York 



ICK OF THE NAME 

f^BESTT^ EmfBUlLT 

ll-EK"^ 3 ^ TAYLOR'S^ 
No. 2 

CIRCUS 
SPECIAL 

TRUNK 






I 



This trunk has 
Improvements 
that win be 
sore to Interest 
job, Guaran- 
teed non-leas- 
able and win (Its sail lee for a good 
many rears. 

■sad for ton Mraealar* and oar NEW 
KIT CATaLOwUB. 

C A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 
t» N. Halttad St, Chicago, 1TL 
ni W. Mm St, New York, N. Y. 



Phone Bryant 4*32 

BONFANTI 

SCHOOL OF DANCING 

Mme. De Fonteny Instructor 
Assceiated 20 years with the Metropolitan 
Ballet All styles of dancing taught lor the 
stage. Clastic and Vaudeville-; also Toe 
dancing. 

Special instruction to chorus of new pro- 
ductions. ISM Broadway. New York. 

6659 Bryant 

MOVING PICTURE and DRAMATIC 
INSTRUCTION 

SOCIETY FILM INSTRUCTION COMPANY 

offers free try-out to those possessing talent 
desirous of entering profession. E_ COOPER 
WILLIS, Director, 247 W. 42nd St, New York. 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, $5.00 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Also a fear 
Second Eland Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunks, $10 and $15. A few extra large 
Property Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunks 
and Bal Trunks. „ . _^ 

Psrlor Floor, 2* W. Slst St, New York dty 



LmiLLER 



i^fittnl In 14 -hours. ' 





Moving Picture 
Camera 

We manntactnre them and 
make them m> to date, la 
every way, tor a reasonable 
price. Catalogue cheerfully 
furnished. Dealer In supplies. 
L. Hstx. SOS E. ttrd St. 
Hew York. 



MAGIC 



ACTS FOR KALB CHEAP. We 
Bay, Sell or ■xcaange need 
Apparatas, Prufeeatonsl Cats- 
log 10c. Parlor Trie* catalog TUXB. Write or 
CaU. Heraasea Xagto Oo„ tt». 1. 470 Sth At.. V.Y. 



TYPE 
ONLY 



ONE SHEETS 

Size 28 x 42, Either Flat or Upright — 
Small Amount Display Matter Only 

Black on Red or Blue Two 
Quantity. Yellow, on White. Colors. 

100 $6.00 J6.00 J8.00 

200 6.00 7.00 9.50 

300 7.00 8.00 11.00 

-100 J. 00 9.00 18.50 

500 9.00 10.00 14.00 

1.000 14,00 IS.00 20.00 

Owing to market conditions, all prices subject 
to change without notice. Send for price list of 
all kinds theatrical type work. Terms: Cain with 
order. Send 10c. for rente nook. 

GAZETTE SHOW PRINTING COMPANY 

MATTOON. ILL., U. S. A. 



TIGHTS 

Cotton Tlghta. Terr coot) quality, 
a pair 90c Worsted Tights, 
medium welctit. $2. 25 a pair. 
Worsted Tights, beaty weight. 
13.00 a pair. Imported silk 
plaited tights, in bright Bed and 
golden Brown, only 92.50 a 
pair. Silkolioe Tights in all 

colors, $2.50 a pair. Hear* 75 
per cent, imported stilt Ugbrj. 
In bright Bed only, reduced from 
S6.00 to $4.00 a pair. Full 
sleere Shirts to match tights, 
same price aa tights. Orders 
filled promptly. Clipper Catalog 
free on application, 

BERNARD MANDL 

210-212 W. MADISON ST. CHICAGO. ILL. 

BB&B Special 

Wardrobe Trunk 

S Pry Fibre Covered 
Chicago: Marshall Field & Co. $45.00 

Send for Catalogue 
B B 4k B TRUNK CO, Pittsburg, Pa. 




PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE 
N. Y. PLAY BUREAl 
mont Theatre, N. Y. 
Stamp for catalog. 



ACTS, ETC. 
REAU, Tre- 
aty. 



NEW DROPS, $10.00 

Painted to Order. Any size up to 15x20 feet, 
in either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colors. 
$2.00 deposit with each order. Scheli'a Scenic 
Studio, Columbus, O. 



P^aaaa WORLD FAMOUS aWt) 

Folding organS 

■ BCST ON SALE tawj 

$10. w 




Ftm. ateutao tbjs^tper.' "" ■ W, 

BILHORN BROS.c2S:Ao-o-r;.tS 



NOW READY 

THE | CUPPER 
RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

For Season 1916-1917 

It contains the names and addresses of Man 
agera, Vaudeville and Dramatic Agents in New 
York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh, San Francisco, Canada; Music Pub- 
lishers; Theatrical Clubs and Societies; Mov- 
ing Picture Firms, and other information. 

Sent only on receipt of 2c stamp, accom- 
panied by a coupon cut from THE NEW 
YORK CLIPPER 



CUT OUT AND 

Send this Coupon and 2c stamp for a 

copy of 

THE CLIPPER RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 
(For 1TK-U17) 

To THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 
New York 



New Victoria Hotel 

IN NEW YORK AT broadwav and 

la's IWin aVrXVs* LONG ACRE SQUARE 

145 to 155 West 47th Street 

■The Very Heart of New York" 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 
350 ROOMS 250 PRIVATE BATHS 

Every Modern Convenience European Plan Exclusively 

ABE MIERS, Manager of Caft Drop in at any time 

Single rooms, hot and cold water 1 

Single rooms, private bath ILSe and up 

Suite, parlor, bedroom and bath $4 and up 

Suite, parlor, 2 bedrooms and bath IS and up 

The Best 50c. Dinner in New York 

C. A. HOLL1NGSWORTH New York City 




Otbers Succeed. Why Cant Ton? 

STAGE TRAINING 

Onus, Center. Vaatnlllt, Stat. DSM- 
il| u4 rmto Niy TniM. Technical 

sod Practical Courses. OlrbriUet vbe 

studied under Mr. AlrUoe; Anntttt Kel- 
leraaan. Nora Bares. Hssel Dawn. 
Joseph Sutler. Barry Plleer. Hue. 
Dane, alary Fuller, Dolly Sisters, Taylor 
Holmes. VMan Pretcott, Eleanor Painter 
and others. Write for catalogna mea- 
UonlDK study desired. 

Alriene Theatre School of Acxasg 

57th St., at Broadway 

Entrance 225 W. STth St.. New Tor*. 

SECOND-HAND 

GOWN S 




ANDREWS. 506 S. State St., CHICAGO 



THEATWCs\L GOODS 



4 



Wig. ") 

TightS > - Catalogue No. 

HosieryJ 
Spangles ~) £ 

Gold & Silver J. Catalogue No, 
Trimmings J 

Jewelry} " Catalogue No. 5 

GOLD and SILVER BROCADES 
SATINS and BEADS 

Catalogues and samples upon request 
When asking for catalogue, please men- 
tion what goods are wanted. 

SIEGMAN & WEIL 

S. W. Car. »te Street asd MsiHtts Areas*. New York 

The Theatrical Supply Emporium 




501 S DEARBORN 51 



jrw 
OS rue 
bush o*oe» ro» 

TYPE P05T£RS\ 



CHICAGO 



CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus, Rolling Globes, Cluba, Batons. 
Guns, Wire Walkers' Apparatus and Novelties 
Stamp for catalog. EDW. VAN WYCK 
Cincinnati. O. 

YOU CAN RENT SCENERY 



For 



Acts, 



Try Outs, for Vaudeville 
Complete Production* 
We Supply Amateurs and Stock Com- 
panies with Everything 

MILLARD B. FRANCE CO., Scenic Studios 
SsVt-Svf West Jath St. New York 

Enlarged and Beautified 

MOUQUIN'S 

6th Ave., bet. 27th and 28th Sta,, N. Y. 

MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC tMP.M. ttl AH. 

WM. CHARLES cU. EVANS 

DRUM SHOP 

E trail r SUM! P teal Drgsji Ess ts( M lew . 

15B EAST tat* IT.. ICW THK. 



C L I F» F» E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding one line in 
length will be published, properly classified, in 
this index, at the rate of S10 for one year (S3 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running. 



CHEWING GUM-BALI CANDY COATED. 

Toledo Chewing Gum Co.. Factories Bldg., 
Toledo. O. 

LAWYERS. 
F. L. Boyd, Attorney, 17 *N. La Salle St.. 

Chicago. 
E. J. Ader, 10 South La Salle St., Chicago, 111 
Joseph A. O'Brien. 1402 Bw=.y.. N. Y. 

MUSIC COMPOSED. ARRANGED. 
Chas. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati. 
Ohio. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
Howard Tunic, 141 Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 
Wit. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

581-583-585 South High St.. Columbus, O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

SONC BOOKS. 

Wm- W. Delaney. 117 Park Row. New York. 

STAGE LIGHT EFFECTS. LAMPS 

(Bought, Sold) 

Newton Art Works, 305 W. 15th St., New Yeek. 

TENTS. 
J. C Goss Co., 10 Atwater St.. Detroit, Mick. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 387 Washington St., Bet- 
ton, Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardware Co., 47 Eliot St., Boston, 
Mast. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 
E. Walker. 309 W. 39th St., New York. 

TRANSFERS. 
Walton, 45S W. 33d St.. N. Y. 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson, 910 Prospect Ave., N. Y. C 



SfiSSSSD 



ztg amssEs mt? 



|a11^th«e4MUni^diwJiirfr<t. 
Staad add cast aad opart •x*m l n*.uoa. 
W»naiwitM Bwn. Saw UM-tTAi-i l— tfve a 
pj*. EaaHltiiK 14k Ttf . .tyU rtac I et- 
|6.iw5, <Jwot.rtnr IcUM.ai. Mcital let. 
t iUHKSentC.O.D. torlaMpmctioa. C*LiJo«- 

1o.«w.( .psF ^xts 't'^A^srSawsv 

geSJbVaYgeVa--w>*aMa*J I*Vt. >' *? UU) LtHeUttl A Tm. . CUcaafps 



WIGS 



TOUPEES, GREASE 
PAINTS, ETC 

A. M. BUCH * CO. 



Ill N. Ninth St, 



NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Full Dreit, Tnxedo aw Prince Albert SniU 

LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St., Chicago 

MUSIC ARRANGED" 

PIANO. ORCHESTRA- Melodies written is 
song poems. W. H. NELSON, Astor Theatre 
Bldg., 1531 Broadway, N. Y. 



Reliable F»roles»s»tone>l 
FRANCIS X. HENNESSY , 

Irtm Plptr— Stauh Flper— Irish 81sp Dag- ' 
err — Scotch IHns Dtneer — VWlnltt (ats- 
^sVdan)— Tracher—Plar Partx iesBts ' 



•tins tadreas: 322 Stett4 Al*., 



Ytrt. 



IMPORTANT.— EVERETT J. EVANS. 
poser-Arranger, makes a specialty of writiag 
music for new authors, and assists publication. 
Send your poems or complete songs. Ettas. 
1900. Suite 505. Astor Theatre Bldg., 45th sat* 
Broadway, N. Y. 



WIGS 



Bsmsa Hair. Irian. Mta. it*, fan, 

Toonrttlt or Meat Dress Wis, 
11.00. 11.50: Han, u ' 

Toe.: Tsshts. tic- Iattsat 
tktikg rrea ftptr 



a t. 



4« 



THE TCCHM1CAL PSESS. Stv VOSK 



AT 



B. F. KEITH'S COLONIAL THEATRE 

This Week, June 18 






DIRECTION— ARTHUR KLEIN 



ri nr> t» fn m u> at mi hi m cr> n> in in iy> mi oo ii> 




Sc5$e NEW YQ RK 




THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



lu in m» m tif tu m m m m mi m iv» m m nn m 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 27, 1917 




very seldom takes a song by an outside writer and when he does you can gamble that it's a corker. We know that there are a 
million patriotic songs on the market. But when GEORGE FAIRMAN brought this song in and I heard it, 1 said, "George. I 
think you've got another 'Tipperary'," and everyone else who has heard it thinks the same. Here's the lead sheet, words and 
music. Wire for your orchestration in any key. 



I 
4 



LEAD. 



I DON'T KNOW WHERE I'M GOING. 

(BUT I'M ON MY WAYJ Worcls k mwic . 



iy geo Ta.irman>. 




Voice 



fPPi 



&x*x - dye CV- y ry- Co- dy f^m 
Terflc <*■ &>*b <*' m&j fin a, 




off fa Jpgfd the £oe—— U n -cZe. Sam~my ti call- £ny ? ne ' t . 

yanJtec through and through I was Born on Jul- y th*. fourth 




£ mtst ao 

nvne>- Pi- two 



— ^ 9*b I'&fi 



J 'fee. Vmftel- znqfvne d*nt you wiskthat yc»W»7t 
na PUmdreh <c~ nmwttff a, fea-ther'on' my 



me Tor I'm sail-vnqto- marroro o*~ vor the deep, tflue sea 

/W For I'm join-id* the. -4r»n-y % what a o yen, tfonk of tfutt* 




IB i 



don't knoio where I'm yo - ony, b&t Im on 



*ny 



*tO0,y—~ ewr I ee~leny to tile. 7ie*~ to- 7ars I'm proved to 




SayZ— *4ndrir& my d»-ty- »- ty night or day — I 




dm'ti 



yo-pj 



y vsty 



Copyright 1917 &y Harry tb& T*k*r fflnsie 'Pub. CS. 



OUR OTHER GREAT BIG HITS 
"Some One's More Lonesome Than You," "The Man Behind the Hammer and the Plow," "On the South Sea Isle," 

"Just the Kind of a Girl," "Wonderful Girl, Good Night." 



HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. 



222 West 46th Street, New York City 



MF.YKR COHEN, Bus. M K r- 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN. 1853. 



NEW YORK, JUNE 27, 1917 



VOLUME LXV-No. 21 
Price, Ten Cent* 



GUS HILL MAY 

LEASE LOEW 

HOUSES 

COULD USE THEM ON CIRCUIT 



Negotiations are under way whereby 
Marcus Loew may dispose of a number of 
bis Eastern theatres to Gus Hill, for the 
showing of International Circuit attrac- 
tions next season. After a conference held 
on Monday, Mr. Loew told Mr. Hill that 
he would like the matter acted upon as 
soon as possible. Hill, in turn, stated that 
it would be taken up at the next directors' 
meeting of the International Circuit and, 
if his associates agreed, further and con- 
cluding arrangements would then be made. 

This move is brought about through the 
close competition of Loew houses with one 
another, both in New York City and other 
cities where the Loew interests operate 
theatres. In the past, Mr. Loew has been 
compelled to operate different styles of 
amusements in these houses, so that they 
wonld not conflict too much. For instance, 
in New York City, the American and New 
York theatres would be ca'Jed competitors. 
In the American, vaudavf'Ia and feature 
pictures is the policy, wh in New York 
feature pictures alone is the policy. In 
another instance, he operates the Yorkville 
and Orphenm theatres in 86th Street. They 
are a block apart. In the former bouse, 
German plays are given, while in the latter 
place, vaudeville and pictures is the policy. 

Then again, in Harlem, the West End 
and Seventh Avenue theatres could be con- 
sidered as opposition. The West End has 
a . picture policy and the Seventh Avenue 
a vaudeville policy. There are several 
other houses in New York and Brooklyn 
which are run along dissimilar lines on ac- 
count of their competitive proximity. 

In Boston, a similar condition prevails. 
Mr. Loew operates three theatres there — 
the Orpheum, St. James and Globe. The 
first two run vaudeville and the latter a 
picture program. 

Probably, with the exception of the 
American and New York, Mr. Loew and 
his associates have suffered financially as 
a result of this close proximity of their the- 
atres. In a good many instances, some 
of these houses have barely kept their 
heads above water in the matter of operat- 
ing expenses. The Loew interests, how- 
ever, having leases on the premises, could 
not very well afford to close them up or 
suspend operations. 

Two of the houseB in New York which 
might be acceptable to the International 
would be the Yorkville and Eighty : sixth 
Street theatres, for the circuit has no 
houses in those sections. In Boston, the 
probabilities are that the Globe theatre 
would be considered a good international 
honse. Last season, in that city, their at- 
tractions played the Castle Square. 

A number of other houses that the Loew 
interests are operating might be considered 
suitable to the International people, and 
they might, in making arrangements, re- 
quest that these houses be turned over to 
them for the circuit. . 

The meeting of the Internationa] direct- 
ors will likely be held next Friday or 
Monday and, as soon as action on the 
matter is token, the Loew people will be 
consulted further. 



"RAGO" NEARLY DROWNED 

Minneapolis, Minn, June 25. — "Rago," 
who is appearing in a specialty act in 
which he locks himself in and out of var- 
ious places, nearly drowned on the stage 
of the Gayety Theatre last week, while 
giving his performance. He bad reached 
that part of his act where he was appar- 
ently locked in a tank filled with water. 
The tank was not really locked, but stuck, 
an4 Al. HiUyer, comedian, saved the 
actor's life by shattering the plate glass 
with a blow from a revolver, permitting 
the water to pour out. 



IT'S HAMILTON VS. HAMILTON 

Atlantic City, N. J., June 25. — With 
the original Mabel Hamilton, formerly of 
Clark and Hamilton, appearing as a fea- 
ture in the revue at the Cafe Beaux Arts, 
while the team of Clark and Hamilton is 
playing at Keith's Theatre here, Atlantic 
City is seeing a lively advertising war 
between them. The Beaux Arts' manage- 
ment has plastered Mabel Hamilton's name 
everywhere as the original Mabel Hamil- 
ton, while the vaudeville team is also re- 
ceiving enough advertising to make the 
rivalry very marked. 



DORA PLOWDEN SETTLES CASE 

A damage suit for $950, brought by 
Dora Plowden against G. M. Anderson, 
has been settled out of court for a slightly 
less sum. In the complaint, Miss Plowden 
alleged that Anderson bad given her a 
letter engaging her for the production of 
"His Little Widows" for a period of six 
weeks at a salary of $160 per week. After 
playing three days in Detroit, she came on 
to New York with the company and found 
that her services were no longer required. 



TO PRODUCE "THE CANDY SHOP" 

"The Candy Shop," the Rennold Wolf 
musical comedy, is to be placed on the 
road next season in Klaw and Erlanger 
houses by Herman H. Moss and Barney 
Reich, of the Rush and Andrews forces. 

A long route has been secured for the 
production which will be well presented 
with new scenery, good principals and 
a large chorus. Rehearsals will start the 
last of next month. 



WINS CASE AGAINST CORT 
A jury in Justice Finelite's branch of 
the City Court awarded William Lorraine, 
a musical composer, a judgment of $400 
against John Cbrt last week. Lorraine, 
through his attorney, Nathan Burkan, com- 
plained that he had written the music 
lor "Let's Get Married," for Cort and that 
$400 was due him for his services. 



ORCHESTRA GOES OUT 

Nbw Britain, Conn., June 25. — When 
two members of the orchestra at Fox's The- 
atre were given their notice last night, the 
entire crew took their- instruments and 
went out in sympathy, obliging the pic- 
tures to be given without music. 



COLUMBIA TO CLOSE JUNE 30 

Manager George F. Belfrage, of the 
"Hip-Hip, Hooray, Girls," has announced 
June 30th as the closing date for the run 
at the Columbia, New York. That date 
will be the end of the sixth week. 



FUND TO LOSE 

$600, 000 

GIFT 

COURT RULES HOGE WAS INSANE 



Zanesville, O., June 25. — Probate 
Judge H. C. Smith to-day refused to ad- 
mit to probate a codicil in the will of the 
late John Hoge, millionaire, which 
bequeathed Ne\ York property, valued at 
$600,Ol<0, to the Actors' Fnnd of America, 
and another parcel in New York, valued at 
$1,100,000, to the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art. The Court held, on the testimony 
of the witnesses to the codicil, W. P. 
Shafer, a banker, and E. R. Meyer, an 
attorney, that Hoge was of unsound mind 
when the codicil was drawn on December 
9, 1916. The remainder of the will was 
probated. James B. Hoge, a nephew, as 
residuary legatee, will receive these prop- 
erties. Under the Court's ruling, the 
Hoge estate was valued at over $4,000,000. 

At the time that the Hoge donation to 
the Actors' Fund became known along 
Broadway there was considerable gossip. 
No one could understand why • man who 
had no active interest in the theatrical 
business and was unknown in the White 
Light district, should make any snch be- 
quest. Even when Marc Klaw- made a 
statement that the bequest was real, there 
were skeptics who could not be brought 
to realize that the fund had profited to the 
extent of over half a million dollars. 

Only one person knew his identity and 
he was a prominent New York attorney. 
Some months ago this lawyer called upon 
David Gerber, who is the attorney for the 
Actors' Fund, and requested bim to furnish 
him with a copy of the constitution and 
by-laws of the Fund. He stated that a 
client of his, a very wealthy man, intended 
to remember the Actors' Fund in his will, 
which was about to be drawn up. The 
attorney stated that he had an idea that 
the Fund's charter did not permit it to 
acquire real estate beyond a certain 
amount, and that he desired an examina- 
tion of it for this purpose. The request 
was granted, and it was found necessary 
to have the charter amended by the State 
Legislature to enable the fnnd to receive 
the gift. 

There was considerable delay in getting 
the measure through the Legislature on 
account of the pressure of other business. 
But it was finally signed by the Governor. 

However, after the bequest was made it 
was ascertained that Hoge was at one 
time the owner of the Shnltz Opera House 
in Zanesville. 



JOHNNY FORD REHEARSING 

Johnny Ford, formerly of Ford and 
Smith, and Gertie Vauderbilt, formerly of 
Vanderbilt and Moore, are now rehearsing 
a new act for vaudeville. T he a ct will 
be under the direction of William T-. 
Lykens. 



BIRD JOINS ELLIOTT & GEST 
Charles A. Bird, for many years one 
or the Shubert's chief executives, has joined 
the forces of Elliott, Comstock & Gest, as 
general manager for the firm. 



IT'S COMMODORE ANDREWS NOW 

Lyle D. Andrews, of the firm of Rush 
and Andrews, has been elected commodore 
of the Centre Port Yacht dub, to succeed 
the late Charles Barton. 



SADIE MARTINOT HELD 
Washington, June 21.— Robbed of her 
once famous beauty, which in her earlier 
days thrilled the old school of acting in 
New York, Washington,' Boston and 'Euro- 
pean cities, Sarah Nethersole, whose stage 
name was Sadie Martinot, walked into 
police headquarters shortly after noon to- 
day and asked Inspector Grant if he would 
protect her. She told a pathetic story of 
being harassed and driven from city to city 
by an unknown enemy and appealed to the 
police authorities to afford her protection. 
After a consultation with Sanitary In- 
spector Lynn, Inspector Grant sent Mrs. 
Nethersole to the Washington Asylum 
Hospital for observation and treatment. 
Sbe said that she bad been in a sani- 
tarium on Long Island, but escaped. Sbe 
married Louis F. Nethersole, well-known 
actor. She told Inspector Grant that she 
had not been living with her husband for 
some time. Sbe gave her address as 9 
G:ove Street, Yonkers, N. Y. 



DISPUTE OVER ACT SETTLED 

Maryon Vadie and Hans Linne some 
time ago entered into a business partner- 
ship in which they were both to share 
equally in the profits of a dancing act. 
Miss Vadie appeared in the act and later 
withdrew to offer a new one with her 
husband, Ota Gygi, in which they are 
now appearing. 

Linne, in the meantime, went ahead 
with the act and placed a Miss Una at the 
bead of it. The act prospered and Miss 
Vadie decided that she was entitled to 
some of the profits. Sbe enlisted the 
services of M. J. Sneiser, District Attor- 
ney of Philadelphia, to press a complaint 
against Linne. The papers in the action 
were drawn up last week, but it is stated 
that Linne settled the case out of court 
by agreeing to pay Miss Vadie a stipu- 
lated sum weekly for fifteen weeks, be- 
ginning July 16, 1917. 

THREE MOSS HOUSES TO CLOSE 

Three of B. S. Moss' theatres are to 
close for the Summer months. The P ros 
pect and the Flatbush will do so Sunday 
evening, and the Regent will shut its 
doors July 15. During the period of the 
suspension of business in these theatres, 
extensive alterations will be made. 

The Prospect will be entirely redeco- 
rated and a new lobby installed. More 
extensive alterations are to be made in the 
Regent. The stage ia to be enlarged fifteen 
feet in depth, the lobby is to be enlarged 
also, and the seating capacity of the honse 
will be rearranged. The Flatbush is to 
undergo a thorough overhauling. The Jef- 
ferson and Hamilton theatres are to be 
the only Moss houses open during the 
Summer months. 



BARCLAY OUT OF "FOLLIES" 

Don Barclay has retired temporarily 
from the cast of Ziegfeld's Follies at the 
New Amsterdam Theatre. The reason 
given is that the material he was rising Is 
not suitable to his talents and that he 
would be out until several new scenes 
could be written for him. Tommy Gray is 
said to be writing them. During his 
absence from the cast Barclay is drawing 
full salary. 



TRY ACTOR FOR MURDER 

San Antonio, Tex., Jane 21. — The trial 
of OUie Debrow, a vaudeville actor, charged 
by indictment for the murder of Leslie 
Nash, a chauffeur, in San Antonio, on Oct. 
31, 1910, started in the 37th Judicial Dis- 
trict Court of Bexar County yesterday. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



June 27, 1917 



AGENTS OUTSIDE 

V. M. P. A. GET 

FEW_ACTS 

PERFORMERS CANCEL ON THEM 



Agents who are booking and procuring 
acts for theatres the owners or operators 
of -which are not members of the Vaude- 
ville Managers' Protective Association, 
have been experiencing considerable diffi- 
culty of late in procuring acts to play 
such houses, which has led to a report 
being circulated that all members of the 
National Vaudeville Artists have been 
warned not to play any house which is 
not owned or operated by a member of 
the Vaudeville Managers' Protective Asso- 
ciation. 

This has placed several acts in a very 
embarrassing position as they had booked 
engagements lasting, three to four weeks 
with theatres which were not members of 
the association. The performers sought 
friends and vaudeville agents and asked 
their advice in the matter. All expressed 
the opinion that it would be advisable to 
cancel the engagements. 

The performers then visited the book- 
ing agents through whom they had booked 
and stated that they wished to cancel 
their engagements. One of these agents, 
who had given an act four weeks of work, 
explained that he had gone to considerable 
trouble in getting the date and that he 
expected it to be played if the act cared 
to get any further work through his 
office. The performer replied that while 
he was sorry, he was a member of the 
N. V. A., and it was hardly possible that 
he would seek any engagement in that 
office in the future. 

This particular agent had nine cancella- 
tions within two days. Another agent 
had about fifteen within the last week, 
and there are several others who have 
been getting on an average of one or two 
a day for the last week. 
' It was learned that these agents are 
arranging for a meeting this week, when 
they will discuss the situation. It is 
said that two lawyers familiar with the 
Interstate Commerce law will be present 
to give advice in the matter. 

Henry Chesterfield, secretary of the 
N. V. A., when asked whether he or any 
of the officers of the organization bad is- 
sued orders that their members were to 
Elay only V. M. P. A. houses, stated that 
e had no knowledge of the matter what- 
ever. He stated that no one connected 
with his organization had authority to 
tell members where to play. 

BALTIMORE MANAGERS CHANGE 

Baltimore. June 21. — Harry Wood, 
former manager of Loew's Hippodrome, 
here, has been selected by the Whitehurst 
interests as the successor of George 
Schneider, who resigned last week as man- 
ager of The Garden Theatre. Wood took 
charge of the house on Monday and great 
things are expected of him. 

Schneider resigned last week to become 
general manager for the Tom Moore En- 
terprises, of Washington. His immediate 
task will be to build a big vaudeville house 
in the heart of the Washington theatrical 
district to cost, with the site, about $400.- 
000, and to seat 3,800 persons. Schneider 
will still work in co-operation with White- 
hurst and the Garden management, and 
also with the Globe Theatre in Philadel- 
phia, in booking feature acts. 

WILLARD FACES CIRCUS TIEUP 
Jess Willard is finding that owning a. 
circus is not all a bed of roses for he is 
facing an injunction snit which may re- 
strain him from giving any performances in 
this State of the Buffalo Bill's Wild West 
Show, of which he is now proprietor. 
John Cnrley. WDlard's former manager, 
is bringing the suit, alleging that $20,000 
is due him because of a three years' 
contract with Willard. dated September 
15. 1914, which would make Willard still 
bound to him. although the champion has 
act -.-.ally dismissed him from his service. 



"THE VERY IDEA" PRODUCED 

New Haven, Conn.; June 25. — "The 
Very Idea," a farce comedy, was pro- 
duced by G. M. Anderson and L. Lawrence 
Weber for the first time on any stage at 
the Shubert Theatre here to-night It is 
the first work of its kind by William L. 
Baron, who has heretofore confined his 
theatrical offerings to the musical comedy 
and vaudeville stage. 

The production was staged by W. H. 
Gilmore, with a cast including Sydney 
Shields, Josephine Drake, Mary Newcomb, 
Laura Allen, Harold Hendee, William P. 
Carleton, Sidney Booth, John Webster and 
Ruth Collins. "The Very Idea." it is an- 
nounced, will be the first of Messrs. An- 
derson and Weber's new production to be 
seen in New York next season. 



"HE AND SHE" GIVEN PREMIERE 

Atlantic Crrr, June 25. — "He and 
She," a three-act comedy drama, by 
Rachel Crothers, was presented at the 
Apollo Theatre to-night by Cohan and 
Harris. The cast includes : Bffie Shannon, 
Maclyn Arbuckle, Thurlow Bergen, Marion 
Barney. Beatrice Prentice, Clyde Pogel, 
Jane Cooper and -Emily Varian. George 
Cohan, Sam Harris, Sam Forrest, George 
Broadhurst and Mary Ryan were among 
those who traveled from New York to wit- 
ness the premiere. 



RAY SAMUELS IN TOWN 

Ray Samuels and Marty Forkins, her 
husband, motored into town early this week 
from Buffalo. They intend to reside at 
Kew Gardens, L. L, for the Summer, 
while Miss Samuels gathers some new ma- 
terial for next season, and Mr. Forkins 
attends to his partnership business with 
Herbert Moore, the Chicago author. 



KELLY BUYS WOODS PLAY 

Perry Kelly has obtained the producing 
rights of the Dolly Sisters' vehicle, "His 
Bridal Night," from A. H. Woods for next 
season, and will send a company on" tour 
in September over the Rlaw & Manger 
circuit of theatres. The c^-npanv is being 
engaged through the Rosf--ftui':?rs offices. 



MOROSCO PRESENTS "WHAT NEXT" 
Los Angeles, Cal., June 25. — At the 
Majestic Theatre last night Oliver Morosco 
gave the first pe rformance of his new 
musical play. "What Next," written by 
himself and Elmer B. Harris, with score 
and lyrics respectively by Harry Tierney 
and Alfred Bryan. 



ANDERSON- WEBER PLAYS TO END 

William Collier in "Nothing But the 
Truth" at the Longacre Theatre and 
"His Little Widows," the musical play at 
the Astor, both under the management of 
Anderson and Weber, w-fll dose their sea- 
sons Saturday night. - 



JOHN SIMONS HERE 

John Simons, of the Simons Agency, ar- 
rived in town Monday, and will remain 
here for about a month. He will make 
his headquarters in the office of Gene 
Hughes. 



HARRY CLARKE WRITES OPERA 

Harry Clarke has completed the score 
of a new opera called "The Cub," which 
will be tried out this Summer in stock and. 
if successful, will be given a Broadway 
production next season.* 



VOICE PUTS ACT OUT 

Kitty Flyiin was compelled to retire from 
the bill at the Jefferson Theatre last 
Wednesday as a result of having lost her 
voice. Rboda Nichols was substituted in 
her place. 



ZIMMERMAN HAS NEW PLAY 

J. Fred Zimmerman, Jr., is engaging 
a company for his new production. 
"Needles and Pins." a play by Frank 
Craven, which win have its first showing 
August 20 at Long Branch, N. J. 



GEORGE SUN 

COMMITTED 

SUICIDE 

SHOT HIMSELF THROUGH HEAD 



Hot Springs, Ark., June 22. — Although 
the family rushed contrary reports to news- 
papers the death of George Sun, widely 
known circus promoter, was due to suicide, 
he having ended his life at his home on 
Hawthorne street, by sending a bullet 
through his head. 

Mr. Sun had been ill for many years 
and of late, bis suffering was very intense, 
so that when he did not appear on the 
morning of the 15th, the family became 
anxious and went to his room to attend 
him. They found him dead, with one bullet 
through his head. Physicians were sum- 
moned, but reported that he had been dead 
for some time. 

For the past ten years George -Sun had 
made Hot Springs his Winter home, being 
a firm believer in the curative properties . 
of the radioactive Hot" Springs. During 
the Winter season, when circus perform- 
ers come to the Spa, the Sun household 
was always filled with circus and theatri- 
cal folk. Mr. Sun had invested thousands 
of dollars in local interests. 

Deceased was the organizer of the well 
known Sun Brothers Circus and although 
paralyzed for the last thirty years, had 
been able to attend to his business. He 
was regarded as one of the best business 
men in the circus world. About three 
years ago he sold his interest in the Sun 
Brothers Circus to his brothers. 



SUES OVER "FALL OF NATION" 

Roscoe R. Roberts has instituted an 
action in the New York Supreme Court 
against the National Drama Corp., which 
produced the motion picture, "The Fall 
of a Nation." He demands $5,000, alleg- 
ing he was damaged to that extent 
through the failure of the defendant to 
maintain a scale of admission throughout 
the country which they required him to 
maintain in houses where be played the 
picture. 

Roberts purchased the West Virginia 
State rights for the picture. He stated 
that his contract called for his playing 
the picture at an admission fee ranging 
from twenty-five cents to a dollar. He 
alleges that, in other States where the 
defendant exhibited the film, this scale 
was deviated from. He alleges that, 
through this operation on the part of the 
defendant, he has sustained the damage 
asked for in his su.t. House, Grossman 
& Vorhaus are the attorneys for the Na- 
tional Drama Corp. 

WAR HALTS WORK ON THEATRE 

Activity in the erection of the 6,000 
seat theatre, by Wiliam Fox, in East 
Fourteenth Street, opposite Tammany 
Hall, has been suspended for the present. 
In its stead a temporary two-story tax- 
payer is being erected. The reason for 
changing the plans is given as the high 
cost of material and labor owing to the 
war. 



RAILROAD SETTLES WITH ACTOR 

Chicago, June 22. — Oscar V. Howland, 
of the Chase-Lister Theatre Co., through 
his lawyer, Leon A. Beresznick, has secured 
a settlement for his baggage, which was 
lost last February in a C, B. & Q. rail- 
.road depot fire. 



FRANK BUELL IS MARRIED 
Frank T. Buell, Luna Park's press rep- 
resentative, and Est ell e Birney, a musical 
comedy actress, were married at the home 
of the bride in this city yesterday, the Rev. 
W. H. Morgan officiating. 



"THE MAN PAYS" DATE SET 

Samuel Shipman's new piece, "The Man 
Pays." will open in Washington on .Inly 
2, with Emelie Polini in the leading rc>'e. 



WOODS ENGAGES MAY TULLY 

A. H. Woods has engaged May Tnlly to 
dramatize "Rucking the Tiger." Achmed 
Abdullah, the author of the story, will 
assist in the work. 



TEXAS MANAGERS ORGANIZE 

San Antonio, Texas, June 28. — San 
Antonio will be well represented at the 
meeting, on July 9 and 10 at Galveston, 
of the Texas Amusement Association of 
Managers, as several managers of theatres 
in this city have been plaeed on very im- 
portant committees, viz. : W. J. Ly tie aud 
Mr. Epp stein, lessees of the Empire, Royal 
and Princess Theatres; Edward Raymond 
and Dr. G. W. Box of the Peticlerc mov- 
ing picture show. "Committee on Permanent 
Organization : Chairman, W. J. Lytic 
Constitution and Laws: Members of the 
committee, Edward Raymond and Dr. G. 
W. Box. 



HILL ENGAGES PRINCIPALS 
Gus Hill has engaged principals for his 
various companies of "Mutt and Jeff 
Divorced," "Hans Und Fritz" .and "Bring- 
ing Up Father," which he will present on 
the International Circuit and other circuits 
next season. Those engaged for the various 
companies are: George Beach, Effie Pier- 
son, George Thornton, Ruby Lusbie, John 
Gorman, Marty "Shorty" Healy, Paul 
Paulus, Louis Theil, B. B. Yager, Morgan 
and West, Mary Heyl, Charlie Saunders, 
Harry Hearn, Clara Gibson, Ethel Vernon 
and Jetro Warner. These companies will 
go into rehearsal the fore part of August. 



CAMPBELL GETS "PEG" 

Robert Campbell, through an arrange- 
ment with Oliver Morosco, has pro-cured 
the right to produce "Peg o' My Heart," 
over the International Circuit next season. 
The show will open at Saratoga, New 
York, Aug. 20, and after two weeks of 
preliminary time will go on the Interna- 
tional Circuit. At the conclusion of its 
time on the Circuit, in May, the company 
will then play all of the cities through the 
Middle West and West to the Pacific 
Coast, winding up its tour in San Fran- 
cisco, in August. 

DOLLY TWIN DROPS DIVORCE 

Harry Weber is responsible for the an- 
nouncement that the divorce action recently 
begun by Yansci Dolly has been abandoned 
and that she and her husband, Harry Fox, 
have been reconciled. Weber is arranging 
for the vaudeville appearance of the Dolly 
Sisters, who will appear by themselves for 
two weeks and will then be joined by their 
husbands. 



TO PRODUCE "WHITE SLAVE" 

A new production of Bartley Campbell's 
"White Slave" will be launched over the 
International Circuit this season under the 
direction of Robert Campbell. A chorus 
of forty-eight darkies will be used for the 
plantation scene. It will open on the Cir- 
cuit in the Lyceum Theatre, Pittsburgh on 
Labor Day. 



NICOLAI GETS "SHORE ACRES" 

George Nicolai has procured the produc- 
tion rights to James A. Hearn's "Shore 
Acres" and will present an elaborate pro- 
duction of this play on the International 
Circuit next season. The play is to be 
produced under the direction of Robert 
Campbell. 



FIELD CO. LEAVES TO REHEARSE 

The Al G. Field family and company, 
who have been around New York and the 
seashore the past week, left for Columbus, 
Ohio, last night preparatory to the begin- 
ning of rehearsals of the Al G. Field 
Greater Minstrels for the coming season, 
which opens Aug. 8 at Niagara Falls. 



ALLIANCE DIRECTORS TO MEET 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Board of Directors of the New York 
Chapter of the National Council of the 
Alliance will be held at the headquarters. 
Ascension Parish House, 249 West 43rd 
Street, Thursday